typography

25 Jun 2007 - 10:38am
0
7 years ago
4 replies
Terms:
Grady Kelly
2007

Font Sizes in Web applications ...

Hello everyone ...

I am curious to know what other designers use in regards to fonts in their
web applications. For the longest time I have used Verdana 10pt. I have
read articles about how Verdana is larger than other fonts at the same font
size, etc, but is that reason enough to use it?

My questions then are:

1. What fonts do you use in your applications? (type and size)
2. What lead you to use those particular fonts? (studies, research,
testing)
3. Does it even matter? Obviously it would not be cool to have your entire
application in Comic Sans, but in general, are fonts an issue?

16 Jun 2007 - 6:10pm
0
Morten Hjerde
2007

Mobile fonts question

I'd like to donate fonts to anyone who are working on mobile phone UI's, but
I don't know if it is legal.

A while ago I made a two font sets, the Nokia Series 40 and the Nokia Series
60. These are the non-anti aliased fonts used in J2ME applications.
The font sets were recreated by me (using FontLab) and I have been using
them to create pixel-correct user interfaces for for the small and medium
size screens. (The new anti aliased fonts for large screens are available
from Nokia)

Does anyone know if it is legal to distribute these?

14 May 2007 - 8:56am
0
7 years ago
7 replies
Terms:
Forrest Maready
2006

Node Graph UI discussion

Has anyone here designed or is designing a node graph/dependency graph
UI? I'd love to have some discussions off list about your experience and
bounce some ideas off you.
One point of contention- vertical flow is more appropriate for the
metaphor, but it makes naming channels difficult. Is there any consensus
about whether writing things vertically:

C
H
A
N
N
E
L

as oppose to "Channel" rotated 90 degrees clockwise is easier to read?

Thanks-
Forrest

28 Feb 2007 - 12:43pm
0
7 years ago
9 replies
Terms:
Dave Cortright
2005

Bringing typography to design – High-ASCII

I recently got interested in typography and read a bunch of books on it. In
the process, I discovered that, in the standard fonts, there are a lot of
unused glyphs that simply don't get used because there is no easy way to
access them. Well, that plus I don't suppose very many designers are aware
of them as options.

There's a great Windows utility out there called AutoHotKey that – among
it's manay capabilities – let's you create auto-correct shortcuts where one
string of text is automatically replaced by another (much like the way
Office works).

15 Nov 2006 - 3:41pm
0
7 years ago
1 reply
Wendy Fischer
2004

mobile fonts

Question, where can I purchase mobile fonts or find a mobile font designer?

We have a game that we are designing and need specially design fonts for the mobile phone....normal fonts aren't working and we don't have the expertise inhouse for typography. We want the font to have a certain type of look and feel, but want it to work on a mobile J2ME game.

-Wendy

17 Jul 2006 - 9:21am
0
8 years ago
2 replies
Cesare Rocchi
2006

Fonts for small screens

Hello,

Has anybody any pointer/theory/experiment about the fonts which are better
(that is, enable better reading) for small (e.g. PDA) screens?

Thanks,

-c.

------------------------------------------
Rocchi Cesare
ITC-Irst Trento (Italy)
http://tcc.itc.it/people/rocchi.html

9 Jun 2006 - 11:42am
0
8 years ago
2 replies
Terms:
jstanford
2003

font size for small screens at a distance

Hello,

I am working on a design for a small screen on a conference room phone which
is obviously not handheld, but will be seen at a short distance (imagine
sitting at a conference room table with the phone about an arm's length
away). Is there any research that has been done on font size at that
distance on a small screen device?

Julie

_____________________________________
Julie Stanford
Principal, Sliced Bread Design | www.slicedbreaddesign.com
<http://www.slicedbreaddesign.com/>
650-799-7225

26 Aug 2005 - 10:13am
0
9 years ago
1 reply
Terms:
Dan Saffer
2003

Font Choice (was Google Talk, continued)

On Aug 26, 2005, at 5:17 AM, Jason Keirstead wrote:

> Personally I find Arie much easier on the eyes vs. Vernada. From my
> experiece the difference between the various sans-serif fonts is
> mostly
> based on personal preference.

This isn't necessarily true. Even though I think it's an ugly, flawed
font, I've had to use Arial on occasion because the letters widths
are tighter than Verdana (a much much better font, esp. for screen
resolution), which makes it easier to fit words into dense tables
when presenting a lot of information.

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