Which programming language should I learn?!

2 Nov 2011 - 6:13am
2 years ago
4 replies
1110 reads
azade.navabi
2011

I am a new graduated interaction designer and have just started my professional career in a consultant company. I have a background in industrial design, so don't have any concrete knowledge about different programming languages. Just I know a little about html and css. Now I need your advice about what should I focus on? a new language like C or continuing with html and css? and what more I should add to this list!

thanks for your help in advance!

//Azadeh

Comments

3 Nov 2011 - 3:02am
Yohan Creemers
2008

It depends on the platform you're doing interaction design for.

If you're designing for the web, then learning JavaScript makes most sense. With JavaScript you can define the behavior of elements on a webpage. Together with HTML for semantic structure and CSS for styling, JavaScript offers all you need for prototyping your designs. You might also want to take a look at JavaScript libraries like jQuery and User Interface libraries as jQuery UI and YUI

Yohan
Ylab, designers for interaction
www.ylab.nl

3 Nov 2011 - 3:07am
dom.latham
2010

I'd say Javascript.

It fits with HTML and CSS and is the most used language for engineering interfaces. It is simple to start with but can be used to a very advanced level. You can start immediately programming in your browser and the documentation is endless.

One caveat. The best way to really learn is to build something. Not just "hello world" but something out there, where your neck is on the line a bit. If your sister-in-law wants a website then build her one and trick it out with some neat JS.

3 Nov 2011 - 3:28am
Shivanand R Yerva
2009

Since you already know HTML and CSS, you can learn HTML5 and CSS3.

-Shivanand

4 Nov 2011 - 5:46am
Roundand
2009

I'd go with JavaScript, moving on to JQuery as the most obvious choice for a client-side framework, and the option to investigate node.js in case you want to go server-side.

I entirely agree with Dom Lathanlearning that to code is all about doing, not reading - you need a project, and I'd suggest using http://jsfiddle.net/ as the ideal JavaScript / JQuery (or one of the other options) playground.

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