Life-changing Products / User Experiences?

20 Jan 2011 - 5:32pm
2 years ago
46 replies
3029 reads
Nickgould
2009

All

I'm working on a list of products, features, or experiences that have made a significant impact on users' daily lives in some form or fashion. Not necessarily huge / dramatic, life-changing differences, but small shifts in service or process that brought a new efficiency, eliminated barriers, or facilitated new engagements or interactions in a way that lifted your quality of life. Things like: 

 

  • check-in kiosks at airports (helps me avoid the agent's line)
  • smartphone check depositing capability (helps me avoid the bank branch)
  • Video rental / streaming to CE devices like TVs, DVD players (helps me avoid he video store...are you sensing a pattern?)
  • Social Media (helps me keep in touch with friends more easily...)
  • Online takeout delivery such as SeamlessWeb 
  • Zip Car?
  • Netflix?

 

What would you put on your list?
Thanks!
Nick

 

Comments

20 Jan 2011 - 6:05pm
david grubman
2008

DVR has changed the life of my family.

20 Jan 2011 - 11:05pm
flyanniefly
2010

Boarding pass on my iPhone

20 Jan 2011 - 6:10pm
Jennifer Quigley
2008

My first thought would be self check out in grocery stores, remembering an experience yesterday evening. Granted, I feel much less suave about bagging swiftly than someone who does this for work though I'd rather save the time. The one thing that does bug me is the moment you place the paper bag on the scale to the right. If I place an empty bag before scanning something, the device tells me I need to removed the unscanned item. If I scan something first, and then grab the bag and open it, the device becomes impatient with me and announces , "Please place your scanned items …" which is sometimes repeated. If I need to move items around in the bags to organize better, the machine gets upset because I have caused a shift in the weight. It's quite a antagonistic beast that could be friendlier, though it still does save time.

20 Jan 2011 - 6:39pm
Josh B Williams
2010

I think the whole idea of having your files in the cloud. (Ie Google Docs, MS Office Web Apps, Dropbox...)

I no longer need to worry about loosing a flash drive because I just post anything I want to take with me to the web and share it with the people I need to.

20 Jan 2011 - 7:05pm
nlguy516
2010

Online Banking
iPhone/smartphone

20 Jan 2011 - 7:14pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

For me, it is systems made up of a combination of services, software, and physical devices.

iTunes + iPod/iPhone + Podcasts - This is now how I consume a majority of my news and high percentage of my entertainment.

Blogs + RSS + Feed Reader - This is how I consume the rest of my news (and a smaller percentage of entertainment).

Digital video/camera + iLife suite + MobileMe + Apple TV - This has made capturing and sharing my family’s life SO simple.

20 Jan 2011 - 9:40pm
AK
2010

High(er) speed internet at home. I used to have to go on campus to just to check email and later wait until after work to 'borrow' the T1 line in the office. Being able to do the same at home on my terms gave me back time during the day.

The Kindle for my girlfriend. She has rediscovered her love of reading by finding more books than what the bookstore offers. She can download them in seconds and bring her entire collection with her everywhere she goes. It also meant less books taking up space in the apartment.

PNC Virtual Wallet. The way it visually shows your expenses has helped a number of my friends understand how they spend money. Some have learned to manage their money and make, in my opinion, excellent decisions about their financial stability. 

iPod + Podcasts + iTunes U  = ongoing education. Instead of listening to music during my commute I get to fill it with thought provoking lectures from professors and speakers from all around the world. Now I don't feel so bad that I would have never been accepted to their programs.

How MacOSX handles multiple displays on laptops. I go from one setup at work, a different setup at home, and a third setup for with the projector. My Macbook just works. My former WinXP machine required lots of Function-F7's and reseting monitor resolutions.

Digital camera with an SDCard with a built-in USB interface. I can take a picture of the whiteboard and not have to redraw it. I can share the picture with anybody who has a USB port and not worry about any camera-specific photo downloading software. This was prior to many laptops getting an SDCard reader built in.

Apple MagSafe. I've had a number of laptop scares because of someone tripping over wires and pulling my laptop to the floor,  especially at coffee shops. Now it just pops out. I don't appreciate it until it happens.

Digital kitchen timer. I use it  to remember to get my laundry, set up 'sprints' to focus on one task, and take naps without having to reset my alarm clock. The one I use has a silent, just flash the lights mode that I use at work so it doesn't bother the people around me.

20 Jan 2011 - 11:05pm
Steve Baty
2009

I would broadly suggest ecommerce, which facilitated direct customer relationships and eliminated or severely reduced the sales & distribution channels that used to be in place. Whilst these still exist in some contexts - supermarkets/grocery stores, consumer electronics retail outlets as two examples - most manufacturers now offer direct channels online.

I'd extend your video rental example and say the big change was actually the introduction of video stores - introducing a personal, in-the-home movie experience that competed strongly with the in-theatre film-watching experience. The introduction of video downloads, dvr and streaming represent a new method of distribution, but the experience is essentially the same - home theatre and the convenience that provides.

Public bicycle share schemes, and the private car equivalents such as Zip Car, have greatly affected notions of ownership of private transportation.

The laptop and the mobile phone as examples of decoupling the physical constraints of a fixed location from the availability of a service/technology. You might include the Sony Walkman into this group as a similar breakthrough in the availability of music. And the battery-powered transistor radio.

Steve

21 Jan 2011 - 5:06am
Louise Hewitt
2010

Whiteboard pens and a glass desk (twitpic.com/3rstwh)
lo-tech, hi-benefit, eco-friendly(less paper)

Lou

21 Jan 2011 - 7:46am
Dave Malouf
2005

amazon prime: Just not worrying about shipping changes the way I think about shopping

in store pick up: alternatively brick & motar stores  that use their online presence to bring people into the store (brilliant on so many levels)

Apple TV: Is changing my relationship with my media. Getting me to digitize my DVDs the way my iPod got me to digitize my CD collection.

The GPS in the car (in my case my phone)

21 Jan 2011 - 11:05am
Mary Connor
2009

Amazon Subscribe and Save: "set it and forget it" grocery shopping: everything from soup cups to dog food. Hoping to get my disabled mother onboard with it!

Mary Connor

21 Jan 2011 - 3:06pm
Shaun Bergmann
2007

Google Navigate on my Android phone in the car.  Not only simplifies driving to a previously unknown location, but I'm sure has the added bonus of being environmentally positive due to the gallons of gas I DIDN'T guzzle while driving in circles.

On Fri, Jan 21, 2011 at 9:56 AM, Mary Connor <mconnor@advsol.com> wrote:

Amazon Subscribe and Save: "set it and forget it" grocery shopping: everything from soup cups to dog food.
Hoping to get my disabled mother onboard with it!

Mary Connor

(
21 Jan 2011 - 3:06pm
David Drucker
2008

Much of the list, including Amazon groceries, SeamlessWeb, much of the content on AppleTV and Netflix are not available (or are scaled down a great deal) here in Canada.

However, we do have one thing that I have not seen much of in the States: Pay by ATM card. ATM card readers are available in every restaurant, convenience store, news stand, or supermarket checkout in the country. No matter what bank you use, you almost never have to carry cash but don't have to put bills on credit cards.

Also, Vancouver has a good electric bus line and Skytrain (overhead train to the suburbs and underground subway to the airport). I can get to much of the city and outlying areas without a car, and there is rarely a wait, no parking fees, and no diesel smell or loud engine noise on the busses. Well-run mass transit is life changing.

21 Jan 2011 - 8:07pm
cfmdesigns
2004

Huh? Swipe and enter PIN systems are everywhere in the US. Are you meaning something else, like the "place your card here" devices that don't requires swipe or PIN?

21 Jan 2011 - 11:06pm
jayeffvee
2007

Has anyone mentioned online bill pay and presentment? I never pay a bill, now, and all my bills are paid on time; everything - both here in the States and for my property in Canada - just automatically gets sucked out of my primary bank account with minimal management on my part. Magic. Definitely life-changing.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 21, 2011, at 8:47 PM, cfmdesigns wrote:

> Huh? Swipe and enter PIN systems are everywhere in the US. Are you meaning something else, like the "place your card here" devices that don't requires swipe or PIN? > >

22 Jan 2011 - 1:07am
David Drucker
2008

> Huh? Swipe and enter PIN systems are everywhere in the US. Are you meaning something else, like the "place your card here" devices that don't requires swipe or PIN?

I'm referring to Interac, ( http://www.interac.ca ), which is a swipe (actually now a chip) and PIN system. When I left the US 5 years ago, there were debit cards, but credit cards were still far more popular and had better penetration. You couldn't guarantee that a place would accept your particular brand of debit card. There may be more PIN systems now in the US, but Interac is 99% universal (I don't think I've ever seen a merchant who didn't accept it.). I guess it's not the technology that changed everything for me, but its pervasiveness.

> > >

22 Jan 2011 - 5:06am
RossSclafani
2009

Most banks have ATM cards with visa or master card logos (ive even seen Amex) that makes accessing your funds as ready as a credit card.

Ross P. Sclafani Design / Technology / Creative 347.204.5714 http://ross.sclafani.net http://www.twitter.com/rosssclafani

On Jan 22, 2011, at 1:30 AM, David Drucker wrote:

> > Huh? Swipe and enter PIN systems are everywhere in the US. Are you meaning something else, like the "place your card here" devices that don't requires swipe or PIN? > > I'm referring to Interac, ( http://www.interac.ca ), which is a swipe (actually now a chip) and PIN system. When I left the US 5 years ago, there were debit cards, but credit cards were still far more popular and had better penetration. You couldn't guarantee that a place would accept your particular brand of debit card. There may be more PIN systems now in the US, but Interac is 99% universal (I don't think I've ever seen a merchant who didn't accept it.). I guess it's not the technology that changed everything for me, but its pervasiveness. > > > > > > > > >

23 Jan 2011 - 12:52pm
penguinstorm
2005

Canada was about 10 to 15 years ahead of the United States with debit cards, thanks in large part to the more centralized banking system with significantly fewer players. They chose a coordinated project and adoption was quite rapid.

I actually, at this point, can't even remember if there was ever an alternative to Interact. I don't believe there was. By contrast the US had Visa Check Cards and various other attempts to create a truly national system, none of which caught on to the great extent that Interac Direct Payment did in Canada.

I haven't spent enough time in the States recently to comment on whether or not your adoption seems to have "caught up." A few years ago I spent a lot of time in Seattle and it was very uncommon to see debit cards.

29 Jan 2011 - 4:05pm
cfmdesigns
2004

It doesn't feel like much has changed in the states in that regard in the past five years, but I say that meaning that POS systems (swipe & PIN) are everywhere I go in the states and have been for years. (I haven't noticed any uptick, but it could have been gradual. And of course, I live in Seattle; might have been different in less tech-driven parts of the country.)

29 Jan 2011 - 9:05pm
leosarma
2010

The programmable universal remote control... literally everything can be done with the touch one single button...

LeoSarmentoleosarma@ig.com.br
2011/1/29 cfmdesigns <cfmdesigns@earthlink.net>

It doesn't feel like much has changed in the states in that regard in the past five years, but I say that meaning that POS systems (swipe & PIN) are everywhere I go in the states and have been for years. (I haven't noticed any uptick, but it could have been gradual. And of course, I live in Seattle; might have been different in less tech-driven parts of the country.)

21 Jan 2011 - 12:14pm
lbogonek
2011

Etsy.com has changed my life, since I can purchase directly from amazing craftspeople and artists all over the world. And some of its tools, like the color-based search tool and suggested sellers feature (which can somehow amazingly sense my aesthetic tastes) I think have actually, the more I interact with them, helped make me a more artistic, design-sensitive person.

21 Jan 2011 - 1:07pm
Nickgould
2009

Thanks for all the great responses, everyone. What a fantastic list! I'll let the group know when I pull the final list together.

 

Nick

21 Jan 2011 - 3:44pm
Sean Gerety
2009

I agree with services like Netflix, DVR's and the like have changed the way I use and access media.  However one thing that comes to mind the is the explosion of the "companion" application.  App's that live either in a smartphone or web version.  For example, Flickr allows me to access content via a desktop app, a web site or via an iPhone app.  This enables me to access, use and add content from anywhere.  The same can be said for Netflix, watch it on the web, my phone, my xbox, etc.  

Sean

21 Jan 2011 - 6:06pm
aschechterman
2004

How about the Undo command? = : ^ )

>

22 Jan 2011 - 8:05am
tonyzeoli
2008

My Top 10 list:

1. EZPass - No more throwing change into a bucket.

2. Final Scratch, which was the first of the digital DJ tools that which replaced your entire vinyl and CD library. But, you still have to bring turntables or CD decks. Let's then jump forward to Ableton Live and Traktor DJ.  DJing on just a laptop is a game changer. I used to bring 5 pharmacy totes and a few milk crates to the club. You needed to have a car to DJ. Laptop DJing has completely wiped out that concept. Now you can put your friends in the car at 2 a.m. for a run to iHop, instead of filling it with your records and fearing that your car would be towed or stolen and your life's work would be gone--poof! I was always afraid to go to the after party, because I never wanted to leave my car on the street with a trunk full of vinyl. And, it's reduced the cost of storing that vinyl. I just moved to North Carolina, and $1,500 out of the $4,000 or so it cost to move, was for my vinyl collection. I now have to buy more bookshelves, which I'd sold a while back because my girlfriend didn't like having all the records on shelves in the living room. That's going to be another $200 to $400 expense, to put the vinyl on shelves so I can actually use them.

3. Software Synthesizers allow you to never have to carry 5 keyboards to the gig. You now just have one midi-controller and a laptop. That's it.

4. Apple Face Time and Skype Mobile Video conferencing - I am absolutely thrilled to be part of the generation that can communicate over video on a mobile phone. It's like the Jetsons! However, its going to take some getting used to, to hold a phone in front of you and shoot yourself talking to someone while people are around. They think you're a little crazy. The best part is, I can flip the screen toward the shelves in the aisle and show my girlfriend what kind of gluten-free cookies they have, so I don't have to guess. The same goes for feminine hygiene products.

5. Someone said ATM cards (debit cards), which certainly makes me feel more safe to not carry cash around for big purchases. In fact, I rarely have cash on me nowadays..

6. Direct Deposit also makes it easier to not have to bring your check to the bank every other week.

7. When it's on time, the Acela Express between Boston and New York. I prefer taking a train directly into a city, then having to fly to it on the outskirts and fight my way in by taxi.

8. The monorail at JFK makes it easier to get to the subway. Now, if the subway would just run faster...

9. PayPal - No credit needed to accept online payments. Anyone can sell online. Love that.

10. Facebook and FourSquare - I love the fact that my friends now follow my life whenever they want. When I see them face to face, they've already been updated about all the little things I'm doing. It's always a conversation starter. My niece said to me the other day, "you're always at the Reese Felts Digital Newsroom." She said it over and over again, like it was something more important, because she reads it off a screen instead of hearing me say it. People may forget what you say, but when they see it over and over again as a Facebook post, somehow it sticks in their mind.

30 Jan 2011 - 5:05pm
cfmdesigns
2004

I can stress the change attached to this enough.  Remember when you went on a trip and you had to budget all your spending out ahead of time and go to the bank to get traveller's checks so you would have the money you need?  (Anyone touch a traveller's check n the past few years?)  Now you just go to the ATM wherever you are.  Even in Canada or overseas, I never change money any more, I just use the local ATM to get local currency directly.  That has been a massive shift in the ability to just up and go.
-- Jim

On Jan 22, 2011, at 5:56 AM, tonyzeoli wrote:

5. Someone said ATM cards (debit cards), which certainly makes me feel more safe to not carry cash around for big purchases. In fact, I rarely have cash on me nowadays..

21 Jan 2011 - 7:06pm
Benjamin Bennett
2003

To expand on the 'always stuck in front of a screen' tip ...

Gilt Groupe (and others such as JCrew.com, Zappos, etc) - I do almost all my clothes shopping online now FreshDirect - I do much of my grocery shopping online now NetFlix / Amazon-on-Demand - videos online; as previously mentioned iPhone, iPad, etc - I view way more 'media' online now than I ever used to

On Thu, Jan 20, 2011 at 6:03 PM, Nickgould wrote: > All > > I'm working on a list of products, features, or experiences that have made a > significant impact on users' daily lives in some form or fashion. Not > necessarily huge / dramatic, life-changing differences, but small shifts in > service or process that brought a new efficiency, eliminated barriers, or > facilitated new engagements or interactions in a way that lifted your > quality of life. Things like: > > > > * check-in kiosks at airports (helps me avoid the agent's line) > * smartphone check depositing capability (helps me avoid the bank branch) > * Video rental / streaming to CE devices like TVs, DVD players (helps me >  avoid he video store...are you sensing a pattern?) > * Social Media (helps me keep in touch with friends more easily...) > * Online takeout delivery such as SeamlessWeb > * Zip Car? > * Netflix? > > > > What would you put on your list? Thanks! Nick > > > (

21 Jan 2011 - 7:13pm
alfpooh
2009

Hi,

Recently, there was simple but really useful change in my way of everyday life. Thanks to  "Instapaper".

After I bought my iPad from Hawaii(though I never visit the island), I love to browse and to find many interesting stories more. But I have no time to read all. "Instapaper" solves some problem by selecting "Read later" 

Whenever I have some time (usually in train or waiting train), I can recall some saved and enjoy it. Similary I tried deli.ci.us  once and files of IE bookmarks but doesn't solved at all.

It's useful. Strongly recommend it for you all.

Alf Bae

22 Jan 2011 - 1:27am
Josh B Williams
2010

This may be a little too SF Bay Area focused but I love the new clipper card as a service design.

It is an RFID bus and train pass that works on any transit agency in the bay area. It also can be setup to auto refill online. It consolidates what could be a trip on three or more different transit agencies from separate passes to one simple card. This removes the need to carry different passes for different cities, or remembering what exact change you will need to bring for what bus.

This is not to say the public transit in the SF Bay Area is perfect but I think they really streamlined the payment process.

22 Jan 2011 - 4:07am
ivyclark
2008

Mobile phone. I would be very lost without mine. It's amazing as I still remember the days before mobile phones, and then we had pagers (does anyone remember those?), followed by the huge brick sized handphones. Apps like maps and 'Around me' on my iPhone has been a life saver on many occasions as well. 

Availability of the internet has most certainly changed our lives. Having access to all that information means we can do some research, seek opinion before making purchases.

Twitter and linked in has helped me connect with many like-minded professionals as well as industry experts from various fields, so we can connect, chat, exchange notes, organise meetups, etc.  

Facebook has been valuable for me as it's the main way I keep in touch with all my inner circle, regardless of where they are globally. It's great to still feel the connection despite being so far apart, and the joy of being able to chat, share photos and keep each other posted is priceless.

Electronic banking systems as a whole (e.g. Electronic Fund Transfer, online bill payments, internet banking, etc) have really cut down the time and effort needed to run errands for paying bills, as well as the challenge/frustration of having to get to post offices, tax offices, or any other relevant payment counters before they close for the day.

In Singapore, we have CashCard systems in place which allow us to make payment for most things without the need to go to a ticketing machine. E.g. Cars are installed with cashcard readers, so we can just drive in and out of carparks, without paying at the machine because the amount due is automatically deducted from the cashcard when the car leaves the carpark. It helps to cut down on wait/queue time, as we can drive straight in and drive straight out. I've actually forgotten what carpark ticketing machines look like until I moved to Perth, Western Australia.
I also carry a collection of books and magazines with me when I travel (different genres - design, programming, marketing, etc) without worrying about the weight of my luggage anymore. This is because I now have my iPhone and iPad. :)  And of course, with both devices, I can also sketch, surf the web, do research, connect with my friends, email, etc.
Hope this helps =)
22 Jan 2011 - 11:05am
Janna DeVylder
2006

The advances of technology that have given the Deaf the possibility of communicating and participating with ease with whomever, wherever - Starting with the TTY, relay services, closed captioning, then moving into video chat, SMS, email... I remember calling my Mom (who is Deaf) when I was in grade school, before phone-to-TTY relay services were readily available, and SCREAMING into the phone, hoping she would deduce that it was me and I needed her to pick me up. I remember having to call places for her and interpret for her, often a frustrating situation for all involved. Now she can call directly, signing via video rather than typing.  She can video chat with her friends. These technologies have made less moments of dependence on others to achieve something... is this technology as the great equalizer?


(
23 Jan 2011 - 3:30pm
paul turner
2007
  • Making voice recordings via the iPod Touch
  • Quiet driving in the Toyota Prius
  • Easy reading from multiple angles via the iPad
  • Wireless keyboards, because keyboard shelves never worked for me
  • Wireless mice on small task tables
  • Soft-close drawers and doors in cabinets
  • Halogen cooking mode in microwave appliances
4 Feb 2011 - 9:06am
Louise Hewitt
2010

Hahaha - really? Soft close drawers 'Changed your life'?

Or is it just nice :D

Lou.

On 23 Jan 2011, at 20:46, paul turner wrote:

> * Making voice recordings via the iPod Touch > * Quiet driving in the Toyota Prius > * Easy reading from multiple angles via the iPad > * Wireless keyboards, because keyboard shelves never worked for me > * Wireless mice on small task tables > * Soft-close drawers and doors in cabinets > * Halogen cooking mode in microwave appliances > >

23 Jan 2011 - 6:05pm
Chauncey Wilson
2007

Good question and interesting to see what has influenced others.  For me, the things that have had a significant impact are:   1.  Phone plans that allow you to call anywhere in the USA for around $50 a month.  I'm 60 and remember making $20 long distance calls to my parents and girlfriends.  While I get exasperated at giant communications companies for things like service and problems with my DSL line, the cost of calling my parents nearly every day for a quick chat has had a significant impact on family life. 

2.  Digital TV recorders. 3.  Disk drives smaller than your hand and memory sticks that hold more than the hard drive I bought in 1986 or so that had 20 meg (and it was top of the line). 4.  Digital cameras (I used to have a darkroom and mix chemicals and make photos in my kitchen or bathroom). 5.  Anti-lock brakes 6.  The Kindle 7.  Online food recipe collections 8.  Dragon Naturally Speaking 9.  The FitBit (digital pedometer with internet connection) 10. Snowblowers with heated handles (that is a recent purchase to cope with the storms and cold in New England).   Chauncey

On Thu, Jan 20, 2011 at 5:59 PM, Nickgould <ngould@catalystnyc.com> wrote:

All

I'm working on a list of products, features, or experiences that have made a significant impact on users' daily lives in some form or fashion. Not necessarily huge / dramatic, life-changing differences, but small shifts in service or process that brought a new efficiency, eliminated barriers, or facilitated new engagements or interactions in a way that lifted your quality of life. Things like: 

 

* check-in kiosks at airports (helps me avoid the agent's line)
* smartphone check depositing capability (helps me avoid the bank branch)
* Video rental / streaming to CE devices like TVs, DVD players (helps me
 avoid he video store...are you sensing a pattern?)
* Social Media (helps me keep in touch with friends more easily...)
* Online takeout delivery such as SeamlessWeb 
* Zip Car?
* Netflix?

 

What would you put on your list? Thanks! Nick
 

(((Please leave all c
23 Jan 2011 - 7:04pm
Jared M. Spool
2003

The TSA. It's nice to know there's someplace I can now go to get fondled in public, payed for with my tax money.

23 Jan 2011 - 9:05pm
Moses Wolfenstein
2010

Skype, especially video chat. I've been involved in musical collaborations with a friend for years now. We still send files to each other via Skype despite much easier and speedy mechanisms for doing so because it's in the same "place" that we check in and catch up not only on the work, but on life in general.
I know that at least in the USA video chat hasn't really caught on, but I have to say there's nothing like sharing a fine malt beverage (read: craft beer) with a close friend on the internet.


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24 Jan 2011 - 3:05pm
Michelle Bacigalupi
2009

I would add on-line banking and bill payment. I no longer have to write checks and realize that I don't have stamps. It is a time saver to be able to schedule payments and know when the money is leaving the account.

Skype - my kids even know how to use it.

I'm getting more out of DropBox than I had ever though I would.

That is my short list...
-Michelle

On Thu, Jan 20, 2011 at 2:50 PM, Nickgould <ngould@catalystnyc.com> wrote:

All

I'm working on a list of products, features, or experiences that have made a significant impact on users' daily lives in some form or fashion. Not necessarily huge / dramatic, life-changing differences, but small shifts in service or process that brought a new efficiency, eliminated barriers, or facilitated new engagements or interactions in a way that lifted your quality of life. Things like: 

 

* check-in kiosks at airports (helps me avoid the agent's line)
* smartphone check depositing capability (helps me avoid the bank branch)
* Video rental / streaming to CE devices like TVs, DVD players (helps me
 avoid he video store...are you sensing a pattern?)
* Social Media (helps me keep in touch with friends more easily...)
* Online takeout delivery such as SeamlessWeb 
* Zip Car?
* Netflix?

 

What would you put on your list? Thanks! Nick
 

(((Ple
24 Jan 2011 - 3:52pm
JEliseM
2010

I know this is old news, but how about Google? I can't remember the last time I had the urge to learn something that wasn't almost instantly satisfied, whether that be how to pronounce a funky name, converting milage to kilometers, where to get a great lunch in a city I've never visited, or what other movie I saw that actor in. 

 

Zero effort access to information is a pretty fundamental shift, and I hear folks remark "what did we ever do before google?" more than anything else. 

24 Jan 2011 - 3:52pm
JEliseM
2010

I know this is old news, but how about Google? I can't remember the last time I had the urge to learn something that wasn't almost instantly satisfied, whether that be how to pronounce a funky name, converting milage to kilometers, where to get a great lunch in a city I've never visited, or what other movie I saw that actor in. 

 

Zero effort access to information is a pretty fundamental shift, and I hear folks remark "what did we ever do before google?" more than anything else. 

31 Jan 2011 - 12:28am
frank gruger
2007

Nick,

Are you thinking impacting "the general population" or early adopters as most of us here would be considered?

I'm surprised to see ecommerce only mentioned once. I know it's not the sexy new app anymore ;) but consider effort required to track down any media that was not "top 40/NYT Bestseller/hollywood blockbuster" in the pre e-commerce era.  You traveled to/called multiple stores checking inventory, or you had your guy at the local record/book store who could try to order it for you, and maybe you'd get a call a few weeks later telling you it had come in or maybe... nothing. eCommerce brought about a huge paradigm shift in the availability of content, particularly for those in rural areas. iTunes and digital distribution make this all less impressive now, but CDNOW will always have a special place in my heart!

Keyless entry anyone? Maybe it's not a game changer, and like ecommerce, we take it for granted, but it's a little connivence that really changed the way we interact with our vehicles.  Think about how people use them to find their car in a crowded lot. Everyone enters the car at once. No more reaching over and unlocking the passenger side for you significant other.

Gmail. I used to have to manage and back up email. Nw it's a record of my life. It's the closest thing I have to searching my brain.


15 Jun 2011 - 12:05pm
eklimcz
2010

Frank,

My name is Erik Klimczak, I'm from Clarity Consulting here in Chicago. I head-up the innovations/ux team here at Clarity and I was interested in potentially hosting an IxDA event at our office.

We have hosted a couple of IxDA events here in the past, which I coordinated through Carolyn Chandler (not sure if they is still admin of the local IxDA group).

I apologize if you're not the person I should be contacting about this....I found your name was listed on the IxDA site.

The topic I'd like to talk about is "Design for Software". Its something of a design process overview for people working on digital projects. I recently gave this talk overseas and it was a great success and I'd like to share the content locally.

You can check out the slides from the talk here: http://blogs.claritycon.com/design

Thanks in advance,

Erik Klimczak Creative Director | p 312.863.3951 | m 708.267.3854 | eklimczak@claritycon.com Clarity Consulting Inc. | 1 North Franklin, Suite 3400, Chicago IL 60606

1 Feb 2011 - 9:20am
smitty777
2010

Hi Nick, 

I had to think about this for a while before answering.  It's a great question, but I was having a hard time pin-pointing any specific technology that had a radical impact on my day-to-day life.  I could have put down something general (computers!) but that seemed obvious and unhelpful.  

To me, the impact of technology has been extremely profound but incremental.  I'm old enough to remember a time before we had computers in the house. And yet I was just considering the amount of time I spend each day plugged into technology.  I wake up, and within 30 mins I'm on the train for the next 1.5 hours listening to my MP3.  I then spend the next 8+ hours in front of the computer, leave and listen to the MP3 on the way back, get home eat dinner check email, watch a little TV and crash. Rinse repeat.  So of my waking hours, I probably only spend about  1-2 hours max not plugged into something.  

So, If you're asking for a dramatic impact, I'd say nothing.  If your asking for a gradual impact, I'd say everything.  

 

 

1 Feb 2011 - 5:05pm
Alan James Salmoni
2008

Great question. For me, Ebay and other auction sites have been life-changing because I can access sales of second-hand camera equipment pretty much anywhere.
Probably the most revolutionary thing is search. I remember spending hours finding even single articles for research but can now cover far more ground than I ever did just by searching. This has led to a massive change in how I deal with information: I process useful data less but rather remember strategies on how to access it in the future. In many ways, it's a poor thing because I feel less knowledgeable than before, but this augmentation using tech as an artifact actually gives me wider coverage. The coverage isn't necessarily better though as there is more noise than there used to be. I consider this to be revolutionary because I have radically changed the strategies I have for accessing useful information.
Comments to articles in newspapers are good. Instead of reading letters several days after publication and trying to recall what the article discussed, instead all are co-located. Plus I can access news articles from anywhere in the world.
Alan
On Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 4:14 AM, smitty777 <wschmidt@nbme.org> wrote:

Hi Nick, 

I had to think about this for a while before answering.  It's a great question, but I was having a hard time pin-pointing any specific technology that had a radical impact on my day-to-day life.  I could have put down something general (computers!) but that seemed obvious and unhelpful.  

To me, the impact of technology has been extremely profound but incremental.  I'm old enough to remember a time before we had computers in the house. And yet I was just considering the amount of time I spend each day plugged into technology.  I wake up, and within 30 mins I'm on the train for the next 1.5 hours listening to my MP3.  I then spend the next 8+ hours in front of the computer, leave and listen to the MP3 on the way back, get home eat dinner check email, watch a little TV and crash. Rinse repeat.  So of my waking hours, I probably only spend about  1-2 hours max not plugged into something.  

So, If you're asking for a dramatic impact, I'd say nothing.  If your asking for a gradual impact, I'd say everything.  

 

 

(((Please leave
4 Feb 2011 - 12:56pm
The Swede
2011

FIREWORKS CS5 (or any previous version).

The ease of use
The direct interaction with objects
The perfect blend between Illustrator and Photoshop
The easy way of creating icons and pixel perfect graphics
The easy way to create wireframes, mockups, interactive PDFs
The best way to go from sketch to final delivery (in the same program)
The easy way to export objects
The list goes on and on....


9 Feb 2011 - 7:12pm
Katrina Tempero
2010

Multibanco!! I am an American living in Portugal, and the ATM system is absolutely amazing here. All banks have a Multibanco machine that you can not only withdraw money with no fees, but also, easily send money to anyone with an account number at any bank, pay your bills, pay social security, taxes, buy concert tickes, train tickets, add money to your cellphone (pay as you go) and more.

http://www.sibs.pt/en/mb/institucional/

 

17 Jun 2011 - 12:44pm
Susan Oslin
2010

The automated litter box!  Anybody with cats can appreciate this.

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