Change blindness citation

11 Nov 2010 - 5:15am
3 years ago
6 replies
1184 reads
Andy Bright
2008

Hi,

I'm looking for a citation relating to change blindness. Specifically, on the case of change blindness being exacerbated by a pause between the states of change.

I seem to recall reading about an experiment where participants were shown a photograph and asked to identify when they perceived that something had changed and then explain the change.

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

When the switch from one state to another was immediate many of the participants could identify that there was a change, yet when the photograph was removed from the screen for even a fraction of a second the percentage of participants successfully  identifying a change dropped off significantly .

Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

This IxDA post http://www.ixda.org/node/25537 mentiones a similar experiment, but it doesn't cite any specific research.

 

Thanks,

Comments

11 Nov 2010 - 7:37am
Chris E.
2009

Andy,

I think you'll find that Ron Rensink is an appropriate resource:

Rensink

I also think there was a thread about this earlier in the year which also has some resources, try:

Change Blindness

Take care,

-Chris

11 Nov 2010 - 8:05am
bdore
2010

Change blindness is also cited on "Designing Web Interfaces" from Bill Scott and Theresa Neil, page 102.

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Bernardo
On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 10:41 AM, floids <floids@gmail.com> wrote:

Andy,

I think you'll find that Ron Rensink an appropriate resource:

Rensink [1]

I believe there was a thread about this earlier in the year -

Change Blindness [2]

-Chris

11 Nov 2010 - 11:05am
James Page
2008

You can get people to do this test. 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ahg6qcgoay4
Jamesblog.webnographer.com

On 11 November 2010 13:21, bdore <berdore@gmail.com> wrote:

Change blindness is also cited on "Designing Web Interfaces" from Bill Scott and Theresa Neil, page 102.

[]s
Bernardo
On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 10:41 AM, floids <floids@gmail.com [1]> wrote:

Andy,

I think you'll find that Ron Rensink an appropriate resource:

Rensink [1]

I believe there was a thread about this earlier in the year -

Change Blindness [2]

-Chris

(
15 Nov 2010 - 11:52pm
Jonathan Wheeler
2009

This might be a worthwhile read:
No pause for a brief disruption: Failures of visual awareness during ongoing eventsDaniel T. Levin, Donald A. Varakin
  

 

13 Nov 2010 - 5:05pm
William Hudson
2009

Andy -

Just to clarify, without the pause, normal motion detection in visual perception finds the changes very easily. With the pause, or alternatively, with a cut-scene or very slow changes, the effects are not as easily observed.

See Simons, D., & Rensink, R. (2005). Change blindness: Past, present, and future. Trends in cognitive sciences, 9(1), 16-20.

Regards,

William Hudson Syntagm Ltd Design for Usability UK 01235-522859 World +44-1235-522859 US Toll Free 1-866-SYNTAGM mailto:william.hudson@syntagm.co.uk http://www.syntagm.co.uk skype:williamhudsonskype

Syntagm is a limited company registered in England and Wales (1985). Registered number: 1895345. Registered office: 10 Oxford Road, Abingdon OX14 2DS.

UCD and UX courses in London and Vancouver www.syntagm.co.uk/design/courses.htm

-----Original Message----- From: ixdaor@host.ixda.org [mailto:ixdaor@host.ixda.org] On Behalf Of Andy Bright Sent: 11 November 2010 11:07 AM To: William Hudson Subject: [IxDA] Change blindness citation

Hi,

I'm looking for a citation relating to change blindness. Specifically, on the case of change blindness being exacerbated by a pause between the states of change.

I seem to recall reading about an experiment where participants were shown a photograph and asked to identify when they perceived that something had changed and then explain the change.

Normal 0

false false false

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

Normal 0

false false false

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

When the switch from one state to another was immediate many of the participants could identify that there was a change, yet when the photograph was removed from the screen for even a fraction of a second the percentage of participants successfully  identifying a change dropped off significantly .

Normal 0

false false false

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

Normal 0

false false false

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

This IxDA post http://www.ixda.org/node/25537 mentiones a similar experiment, but it doesn't cite any specific research.

 

Thanks,

(((

15 Nov 2010 - 5:58pm
bojcampbell
2010

Here is a link to a change blindness test we used in the HCI Master's program.

http://www.gocognitive.net/demo/change-blindness

 

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