Re: [IxDA] Question about US style UX Resumes compared with the UK

8 Oct 2010 - 12:59pm
3 years ago
2 replies
625 reads
Bill Barranco
2009

Sean, This is common in not only your field, but other fields as well. It is not uncommon for Candidates to try to "pump" their credentials. I just see this as a red flag, one of dishonestly and arrogance

Bill Barranco

On 10/8/10 1:28 AM, "Sean Pook" wrote:

> Hi all, > > I'm very familiar with UK style CVs/Resumes. I've read enough of them over > the past 4 years or so. > > You may have noticed I'm making forays into the US UX market and I have > noticed some sizable differences in the way people present themselves. Two > problems (for me) I have come across: > > 1) Resumes depicting senior practiioners are often actually people with team > lead/management and sometimes even board level experience, but their resume > gives the impression they are at the senior design/architect level. People > have told me this is common, unlike in the UK, where people are quick to add > the most superior sounding job title to their CV as soon as they have the > chance (sometimes too fast). Is this common? > > 2) I received a resume today from a candidate who is Director of User > Experience, and has been for the past several months. Prior to this, the > candidate was a technical development manager (as recent as 2010), and the > candidate's career history leading back from there has been software > development. > > How does someone with such a career path land a job as a Director of User > Experience?. No UCD training, education, or commercial experience. I found > it facinating. My head tells me he/she wont be right for the role I'm > soucring for, but I often encounter opposition when saying so. > > Thoughts are welcome. > > Sean > > (((Please leave all content below this line))) > ________________________________________________________________ > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA) Discussion! > Manage Subscriptions or Unsubscribe .......... > http://www.ixda.org/user/32562/notifications > Discussion Guidelines .......... http://www.ixda.org/help > > -- > > View original post: > http://www.ixda.org/mailcomment/redirect/%3C32562.27884.0.1286524422.38e0422dc > 4f0a400f0edcf8d06e1843b%40ixda.org%3E > > >

Comments

9 Oct 2010 - 10:04am
meenalc
2009

If the candidate is confident; test him in the interview....

if he really knows what he has written about.... there is no question of doubt.  This candidate cannot be written off due to assumptions/ideas/generalization; what will be the most negative thing??? he might fumble and faked up his resume and u r saved.

the good thing: u might get a good employee :)

11 Oct 2010 - 10:05am
jrydberg
2010

If he used to be director of UX, why can't he put that on his resume?
On Fri, Oct 8, 2010 at 8:28 PM, Bill Barranco <bill@auto-vision.com> wrote:

Sean, This is common in not only your field, but other fields as well. It is
not uncommon for Candidates to try to "pump" their credentials. I just see
this as a red flag, one of dishonestly and arrogance

Bill Barranco

On 10/8/10 1:28 AM, "Sean Pook" wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I'm very familiar with UK style CVs/Resumes. I've read enough of them over
> the past 4 years or so.
>
> You may have noticed I'm making forays into the US UX market and I have
> noticed some sizable differences in the way people present themselves. Two
> problems (for me) I have come across:
>
> 1) Resumes depicting senior practiioners are often actually people with team
> lead/management and sometimes even board level experience, but their resume
> gives the impression they are at the senior design/architect level. People
> have told me this is common, unlike in the UK, where people are quick to add
> the most superior sounding job title to their CV as soon as they have the
> chance (sometimes too fast). Is this common?
>
> 2) I received a resume today from a candidate who is Director of User
> Experience, and has been for the past several months. Prior to this, the
> candidate was a technical development manager (as recent as 2010), and the
> candidate's career history leading back from there has been software
> development.
>
> How does someone with such a career path land a job as a Director of User
> Experience?. No UCD training, education, or commercial experience. I found
> it facinating. My head tells me he/she wont be right for the role I'm
> soucring for, but I often encounter opposition when saying so.
>
> Thoughts are welcome.
>
> Sean
>
> ((
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