Re: [IxDA] Re: [IxDA] Re: [IxDA] Simplicity is Not Overrated, Just Misunderstood

28 Sep 2010 - 5:02pm
4 years ago
1 reply
630 reads
Richard Carson
2010

Hey Janne,

> The issue I see with "people buy simplicity/features" is that people > don't always buy things they need, but what they think they need, > might need, or want to need. At purchase time it's also often the case > there is insufficient information about the product as well as about > the individuals own behaviour, yet they need to decide somehow.

I don't believe that people buy things they don't need else why do they buy them? People buy things they love, whether it is useful or necessary, they are still buying something that facilitates their human need. They'll buy security features that they might not use (ie: insurance), better safe than sorry, however it buys them peace of mind.

Overall, the simplicity of the product is what the consumer understands and knows. They need a big reliable truck vs they need a safe and comfortable one. Merging all these features together into one takes away from simplicity and you end up with a product that the user wont want, because it becomes something the consumer does not need. A truck is ugly to some and others could give two cents for something nice and reliable. Simplicity sells because the truck driver wants a big truck.

Of course there are many other factors involved in the sale, much outside the realm of designing the interaction for one particular product.

Best regards,

Richie

Comments

28 Sep 2010 - 8:05pm
willdonovan
2009

I agree with your opening comment Richard.
However I do think it is a twist on the old marketing adage of selling a product or service to a consumer not from the position of they don't need it, because they are being sold on something they 'didn't know' they needed it.


William Donovan


On 29 September 2010 10:05, Richard Carson <richard.carson75@gmail.com> wrote:

Hey Janne,

> The issue I see with "people buy simplicity/features" is that people
> don't always buy things they need, but what they think they need,
> might need, or want to need. At purchase time it's also often the case
> there is insufficient information about the product as well as about
> the individuals own behaviour, yet they need to decide somehow.

I don't believe that people buy things they don't need else why do they buy them? People buy things they love, whether it is useful or necessary, they are still buying something that facilitates their human need. They'll buy security features that they might not use (ie: insurance), better safe than sorry, however it buys them peace of mind.

Overall, the simplicity of the product is what the consumer understands and knows. They need a big reliable truck vs they need a safe and comfortable one. Merging all these features together into one takes away from simplicity and you end up with a product that the user wont want, because it becomes something the consumer does not need. A truck is ugly to some and others could give two cents for something nice and reliable. Simplicity sells because the truck driver wants a big truck.

Of course there are many other factors involved in the sale, much outside the realm of designing the interaction for one particular product.

Best regards,

Richie

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