Scholarships/Grants for Grad School

15 Sep 2010 - 8:10pm
3 years ago
3 replies
905 reads
Zelbinian
2010

I'm in the process of applying for grad school, looking to learn about and study the usability of public transit systems. This is cross-disciplinary, but a big component of it is masters-level training in UX/Interaction Design. Would anyone happen to know of good scholarships/grants to chase for work in this area?

Comments

15 Sep 2010 - 9:52pm
katey
2010

My suggestion is to look into an R1 with an HCI or Information program within the engineering school. These are the types of programs where you are most likely to be funded for doing research or teaching.

I am part of the Design: Use: Build group at the University of Washington, where there are several cross-disciplinary studies related to usability in public transit ongoing (eg. OneBusAway). Most of that type of work is funded by the NSF or other government funds. What that funding means for you is that you can get a free education and paid a small stipend for doing your research.

My advice if you decide to go this route is to do very well on the GRE and write a great application outlining your specific goals, that will make you stand out to faculty with funding to give.

Hope that helps!

-Katey

 

16 Sep 2010 - 12:21am
Zelbinian
2010

Part of my concern is that two of the schools I'm applying to are abroad (U. of Queensland and University College London), and they like to know that you can pay at least your room and board before extending a student visa. I think it's the case that you don't  have to have the money in hand and that you just have to demonstrate a decent plan to get it, but I'm trying to see how much before-you-get-in money there is available so I can make the best case possible.

That said, I definitely appreciate the advice, and I totally intend on using my I'm-totally-getting-a-PhD status to net me some tuition money.

16 Sep 2010 - 10:07am
Michele Marut
2005

Hi,
Also consider options to work as a teaching assistant in one of these departments. This gives you a chance to interact with the professors and often get in on existing grants and research work. At Cornell, they waived the tuition and gave teaching assistants a stipend which really made grad school affordable for me. Other schools may have similar programs.
- Michele 

On Thu, Sep 16, 2010 at 3:11 AM, Zelbinian <dustin.l.hodge@gmail.com> wrote:

Part of my concern is that two of the schools I'm applying to are abroad (U. of Queensland and University College London), and they like to know that you can pay at least your room and board before extending a student visa. I think it's the case that you don't  have to have the money in hand and that you just have to demonstrate a decent plan to get it, but I'm trying to see how much before-you-get-in money there is available so I can make the best case possible.

That said, I definitely appreciate the advice, and I totally intend on using my I'm-totally-getting-a-PhD status to net me some tuition money.

((
Syndicate content Get the feed