Wording survey questions ("What is your blood pressure?" versus "My blood pressure is...")

28 Jul 2010 - 1:38pm
3 years ago
3 replies
1063 reads
Anonymous

What are your thoughts about wording questionnaires? 

"What is your blood pressure?" versus "My blood pressure is..."

Answers are radio buttons below the questions.

The first option seems more accusatory while second option might require more thought from participant as its a bit fragmented. This is a health questionnaire so I am trying a softer approach.

Best,

Ken

 

Comments

28 Jul 2010 - 8:05pm
Steve Baty
2009

Ken,

I'm not clear on the response you're looking for from respondents. The radio buttons give a subjective list (Low/Normal/High) or approximate values (100/60, 120/80 etc). 2nd question: what is the context for the question? Have they just measured their blood pressure? Are you asking about the last time they had it measured?

Thanks
Steve

On 29 July 2010 09:01, Ken <kwhaler@gmail.com> wrote:

What are your thoughts about wording questionnaires? 

"What is your blood pressure?" /versus /"My blood pressure is..."

Answers are radio buttons below the questions.

The first option seems more accusatory while second option might require more thought from participant as its a bit fragmented. This is a health questionnaire so I am trying a softer approach.

Best,

Ken

 

(((
29 Jul 2010 - 11:00am
penguinstorm
2005
Questions should be clear and there should be a clear answer. The second is a softball: it's not a clear question. It might be nicer for for your participants to read, but if you're trying to get through the survey quickly I'd go with the first. There's nothing accusatory about your first example at all. If people have opted into the survey, they should be expecting questions of a somewhat personal nature anyway.
29 Jul 2010 - 1:22pm
Anonymous

Second option it is - it does seem more straight forward. I have seen labels used both ways.  Thanks for the feedback.

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