Re: [IxDA] transition to ipad - no hover - behaviors unclear - ideas?

15 Jun 2010 - 4:14am
3 years ago
4 replies
564 reads
Stew Dean
2007



On 15 June 2010 04:50, elvenmuse <vincenzi@lavabit.com> wrote:

I think that it is important to note (although I'm not 100% sure), that
the technology can be used to simulate hovers: getting near (but not "in
touch/contact" with) the MT screen can activate a hover animation.

I would doubt that even if the technology existed it would be easy to use. The concept of hovering near something to activate it would be alien to most people who arn't theremin players.   I'm currently looking this issue at the moment and my initial thoughts are mouse based navigation systems start to fall appart when you use your fingers.  Left hand navigtions and drop downs don't work nearly as well and more main body navigation starts to make more sense.

  Stew Dean

Comments

15 Jun 2010 - 11:05am
Andy Adler
2009

If the screen can register pressure, like my Wacom tablet, the hover behavior could be linked to a light touch. Even without actual pressure sensitivity, if the screen can report the area of the touch, a smaller area can be reported as a light touch.

aa

On Jun 15, 2010, at 8:40 AM, Stew Dean wrote:

> On 15 June 2010 04:50, elvenmuse wrote: >> I think that it is important to note (although I'm not 100% sure), thatthe technology can be used to simulate hovers: getting near (but not "in >> touch/contact" with) the MT screen can activate a hover animation. >> > I would doubt that even if the technology existed it would be easy to use. The concept of hovering near something to activate it would be alien to most people who arn't theremin players. I'm currently looking this issue at the moment and my initial thoughts are mouse based navigation systems start to fall appart when you use your fingers. Left hand navigtions and drop downs don't work nearly as well and more main body navigation starts to make more sense. Stew Dean >

15 Jun 2010 - 1:07pm
Stefan_Wallin
2010

Technically yes, but when I've tried do fingerpaint i photoshop with pressuresensitive brushes with my Wacom Bamboo Pen and Touch it's almost digital, on or off. I have a really hard time applying light pressure to the wacom. I would think that as a use situation most people won't understand what they are dooing and hover states will just fly by on the monitor without any apparent logic on the users behalf.


And the real question for me as an person who don't yet own a iPad is how does it technically work?

So for now I think that touch input won't be as specific and exact as mouse or keyboard input.

Stefan Wallin - Festiz Webbyrå
=====================================
0709-529 036 || stefan.w@festiz.com
http://festiz.com || http://twitter.com/Stefan_Wallin



On Tue, Jun 15, 2010 at 7:27 PM, Andy Adler <AndyAdler@liquidamber.com> wrote:

If the screen can register pressure, like my Wacom tablet, the hover behavior could be linked to a light touch. Even without actual pressure sensitivity, if the screen can report the area of the touch, a smaller area can be reported as a light touch.

aa

On Jun 15, 2010, at 8:40 AM, Stew Dean wrote:

> On 15 June 2010 04:50, elvenmuse wrote:
>> I think that it is important to note (although I'm not 100% sure), thatthe technology can be used to simulate hovers: getting near (but not "in
>> touch/contact" with) the MT screen can activate a hover animation.
>>
> I would doubt that even if the technology existed it would be easy to use. The concept of hovering near something to activate it would be alien to most people who arn't theremin players. I'm currently looking this issue at the moment and my initial thoughts are mouse based navigation systems start to fall appart when you use your fingers. Left hand navigtions and drop downs don't work nearly as well and more main body navigation starts to make more sense. Stew Dean
>

(
15 Jun 2010 - 11:05am
arasbm
2010

I am very interested in this problem as well.

I would agree that most mouse interaction techniques are obsolete when designing multi-touch interfaces. But hover query is a different animal. I think the main advantage of hover query is to provide a very light interaction so new users can explore without having to worry about breaking the state of the application. Now, with the ipad in particular I dont think there is a reliable way to distinguish touch from near-touch position since it is based on the capacitive technology. Using other multi-touch mediums however (for example vision based) it is becoming possible to detect exact position and direction of user's fingers.

One solution to the general problem of hover-query on multitouch interfaces could be using direction of index finger. When user brings their hand near the screen and points at something with their index finger a feedback is given to show them where they are pointing at, and this would trigger hover query when possible.

This of course would not work with most existing Internet tablets. For those we have to find a workaround to deal with the limitations of the mainstream touch technology. What do you folks think?

~Aras

On Tue, Jun 15, 2010 at 4:41 AM, Stew Dean <stewdean@gmail.com> wrote:

On 15 June 2010 04:50, elvenmuse <vincenzi@lavabit.com [1]> wrote:
I think that it is important to note (although I'm not 100% sure), thatthe technology can be used to simulate hovers: getting near (but not "in
touch/contact" with) the MT screen can activate a hover animation.

I would doubt that even if the technology existed it would be easy to use. The concept of hovering near something to activate it would be alien to most people who arn't theremin players.   I'm currently looking this issue at the moment and my initial thoughts are mouse based navigation systems start to fall appart when you use your fingers.  Left hand navigtions and drop downs don't work nearly as well and more main body navigation starts to make more sense.   Stew Dean
(((Pl
16 Jun 2010 - 11:05pm
Larry Tesler
2004

I think a system that supported both hovering and touching would not be easy to use:
- If the system equated hovering and touching, considering them both a "tap", the user would often generate a "tap" unintentionally just by getting close. - If the system distinguished hovering and touching, many users would have trouble avoiding an accidental touch.
My basis for that prediction is not from the multi-touch mobile device world, it's from the single-touch Graphics Tablet world. Over ten years ago, I tested a Scriptel tablet with a wired pen. Hovering provided helpful feedback that the pen tip was close to the surface. But I did not find it easy to avoid an accidental touch. It's probably the same today with Scriptel's pen-and-finger technology, because their website only claims, "Detects hovering pen for cursor steering."
Larry
On 15 June 2010 04:50, elvenmuse <vincenzi@lavabit.com [2] [1]> wrote:

I think that it is important to note (although I'm not 100% sure), thatthe technology can be used to simulate hovers: getting near (but not "in
touch/contact" with) the MT screen can activate a hover animation.

Syndicate content Get the feed