Sports Illustrated HTML5 Prototype

21 May 2010 - 7:52am
4 years ago
7 replies
1173 reads
Jerome Covington
2008

Who watched the Day One Keynote of Google I/O this past Wednesday? As a developer very committed to effective UX/IxDA I'd love to hear the community's response to the Sport Illustrated HTML5 prototype premiered there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3j7mM_JBNw

 

 

Comments

21 May 2010 - 9:33am
Yvonnia Martin
2009

Wow! What a truly rich way to experience a magazine! Being a pub designer as well, this demonstration has encouraged me to think beyond the type, images and printer to create a product for the future. My concern is the user's understanding of how it functions, though. There aren't really any tools to help initiate a new user to the cool widgets. If you notice, the demonstrator seems to know where to click for these contextual widgets...the interface itself does not infer. Yes, he does eventually display a dashboard at he bottom, but how would I know it was there? Many of those interactions look like regular javascript libraries to me. I think it's the video piece, the real-time survey and the circular widget that might be the parts that scream "Hey, HTML 5 is over here"...but of course, joe public is not going to know that.

I last heard that HTML 5 is not totally supported yet (esp. slightly older browsers...I may have heard wrong). But either way this demo is very cool...really gets your imagination juices flowing. Definitely stealing some bits from it :)

JMHO
--Yvonnia

21 May 2010 - 10:05am
Hugh Griffith
2007

Honestly, I think it's a big failure. It looks like this is a downloadable application rather a web site. (Why would anyone besides Apple or Android users want that?) But, he says it's for "...laptops, netbooks, and tablets". (Huh? Desktops get left out?) So it must be meant to run in a browser. But if it is, the complete lack of any obvious navigation is going to confuse the heck out of people.


The layout just doesn't feel right either. (I thought the same about the touch based version.) I'm not convinced the three column text works. Has anyone seen or done any tests on that yet?

Anyhoo, it seems like they're trying to bring the tablet, touch screen navigation to the desktop web. Which for obvious reasons, is completely absurd.


Hugh Griffith
User Interface Designer
www.interactionhero.com


On Fri, May 21, 2010 at 8:32 AM, Jerome Covington <jeromecovington@gmail.com> wrote:

Who watched the Day One Keynote of Google I/O this past Wednesday? As a developer very committed to effective UX/IxDA I'd love to hear the community's response to the Sport Illustrated HTML5 prototype premiered there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3j7mM_JBNw [1]

 

 

((
21 May 2010 - 8:05pm
mdostert
2010

Hello,

I liked it particularly because of the way they displayed the photographs. I do have a few issues with the three column format only in that they deviate from maintaining the proportions of the 3:1 ratio. For example, sometimes the photograph takes half the page and then the other half of the page is the other two columns, which is fine, but the proportions are off. The photograph should make up the size of either one or two or multiples of the 3:1 relationship. The layout is thus inconsistent in terms of proportions.

Navigation is an issue, but I wonder if this is something we cannot see because it is being offered as a presentation. The first has a graphic with a large arrow saying to click to look inside and other pages show arrows mid-way down on the right side of the page. Don't really know.

Duh, I didn't even think it may be touchscreen navigation like you said. Having worked at jobs that had touch screen navigation resulting in swollen finger and joints, I am not a real fan of it. I still use my mouse instead of the touch pad on my laptop. However, the sensitivity of the screen to a persons' finger pad may be much better than my laptop.

Maureen Dostert 919.490.8405 mdostert2002@yahoo.com

----- Original Message ---- From: Hugh Griffith To: mdostert2002@yahoo.com Sent: Fri, May 21, 2010 12:55:26 PM Subject: Re: [IxDA] Sports Illustrated HTML5 Prototype

Honestly, I think it's a big failure. It looks like this is a downloadable application rather a web site. (Why would anyone besides Apple or Android users want that?) But, he says it's for "...laptops, netbooks, and tablets". (Huh? Desktops get left out?) So it must be meant to run in a browser. But if it is, the complete lack of any obvious navigation is going to confuse the heck out of people.

The layout just doesn't feel right either. (I thought the same about the touch based version.) I'm not convinced the three column text works. Has anyone seen or done any tests on that yet?Anyhoo, it seems like they're trying to bring the tablet, touch screen navigation to the desktop web. Which for obvious reasons, is completely absurd.

Hugh GriffithUser Interface Designerwww.interactionhero.com [1]

On Fri, May 21, 2010 at 8:32 AM, Jerome Covington wrote: > Who watched the Day One Keynote of Google I/O this past Wednesday? As a developer very committed to effective UX/IxDA I'd love to hear the community's response to the Sport Illustrated HTML5 prototype premiered there. > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3j7mM_JBNw [3] [1] > >
> >
> > (( >

23 May 2010 - 8:38am
Jared M. Spool
2003

 

Who watched the Day One Keynote of Google I/O this past Wednesday? As a developer very committed to effective UX/IxDA I'd love to hear the community's response to the Sport Illustrated HTML5 prototype premiered there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3j7mM_JBNw
It's a great demo. Let's see what it looks like when you get real content in there, week after week.

23 May 2010 - 9:14am
fj
2010
Check the history of the web for a good guess: - unbearable intrusive ads on every page - content will not show well on half the user agents the user populations want to browse with - user comments will make advertisers balk and clamor for removal of user comments - interactivity and customization possibilities will be superficial because the Creative Director believes in "delivering a premium experience" - cheap template knock-offs will appear making the premium version overexposed and banal. I think I am not believing in this "new model" today.
23 May 2010 - 1:58pm
ccchristine
2010

 This demo does a good job of showcasing HTML5 capabilities. I like the contextual approach to presenting content and tools.

23 May 2010 - 1:58pm
ccchristine
2010

 This demo does a good job of showcasing HTML5 capabilities. I like the contextual approach to presenting content and tools.

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