Custom Controls Vs Native Standard Controls for Web 2.0

6 May 2010 - 11:57pm
4 years ago
2 replies
840 reads
ofilippelli
2010

Does anybody understands the limitations of native standard controls such as the ones provided by Microsoft Devexpress?  I keep banging my head agains this wall over an over.  I am trying to enhance the look and feel of our soft products, some are migrating from Client base to web base products.  My CTO its completely against custom controls! Which means for me that I have to use the same drop down, popup, buttons, etc across all our products.  Why can't I customize these controls? Something must be defining that corner (on a popup window) as a square with a blue outline, why can't I change that setting into a round corner with a gray gradient color? or the button from a light blue gradient to a solid black? How can I make the case to justify developers to go the extra mile and use custom controls?

Any help would be appreciated! :-)

Omar

Comments

7 May 2010 - 1:30am
Sam Murray-Sutton
2009

I personally try to avoid customising browser inputs too much. The main reason is that these match the operating system the user is working within. In theory this means less work for the user in understanding your interface.

The best argument I can think of for breaking with these conventions is where the standard inputs don't work well for the tasks you're trying to support. The search filter on travel website kayak is a good example. They use their own javascript enabled sliders to sort results, which offer a simpler way of doing that than the standard inputs.

All the best,

- Sam

On May 7, 2010 6:02 AM, "ofilippelli" <omar.filippelli@yahoo.com> wrote:

Does anybody understands the limitations of native standard controls such as the ones provided by Microsoft Devexpress?  I keep banging my head agains this wall over an over.  I am trying to enhance the look and feel of our soft products, some are migrating from Client base to web base products.  My CTO its completely against custom controls! Which means for me that I have to use the same drop down, popup, buttons, etc across all our products.  Why can't I customize these controls? Something must be defining that corner (on a popup window) as a square with a blue outline, why can't I change that setting into a round corner with a gray gradient color? or the button from a light blue gradient to a solid black? How can I make the case to justify developers to go the extra mile and use custom controls?

Any help would be appreciated! :-)

Omar

(((P

7 May 2010 - 3:41pm
milan
2005

In the very near future, there will be web apps looking and behaving like desktop apps and the other way around, cross-platform systems relying on Air and Silverlight etc to look the same regardless of the underlying platform, and of course many software vendors and other companies establishing their own guidelines to push their brand and product families on any platform or technology.

The rigid unification of a computer based on some standards of the operating system, and the adaptation of every control to match the platform is a thing of the past. If this development helps people using digital products is another question - but it's definitely the development that I see in daily practice.

The usual suspects deliver many examples of this: Google Apps, iTunes or Facebook do not really match operating system standards. My approach: make a good product, be consistent when it supports an overarching experience, innovate where it makes sense, and try not to break the environment. Each case is different.

Milan

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