Behavioral mapping?

3 Mar 2004 - 5:53pm
10 years ago
5 replies
1657 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

Hey there,

I was wondering if anyone had any tools or references for how to
behaviorally map out an interaction design? In this case it is of an
existing product.

What I want to do is get to the core semantics and syntax that makes up the
behavior in such a way that we can go back and re-arrange the behavior into
a new structure and give that behavior a new presentation.

The closest thing I have found is the Visual Vocabulary of Jesse James
Garrett, but its not quite complete enough for me in its set of nouns,
verbs, adjectivies and adverbs. Or more accurrately, I'm not able to
translate with it and thus it isn't a good rosetta stone for me.
http://jjg.net/ia/visvocab/

What do other people use for similar types of tasks? Is this exercise even
valuable?

-- dave
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Comments

4 Mar 2004 - 8:14am
Dan Saffer
2003

I guess I'm trying to figure out what this sort of vocabulary would
contain. Stuff like:

NOUNS
button
slider
dial
etc

VERBS
push
turn
pull
display
reveal
etc

In the past, I've simply captured these in a task flow. But maybe there
is some value in having an set of standardized items for each one. You
could see things like the number of buttons you have at a glance, for
example. It would have to be expandable of course, and we'd have to
come up with some stencils for Visio and Omnigraffle (at least). Sounds
like a project for someone...

Dan

Dan Saffer
M.Des. Candidate, Interaction Design
Carnegie Mellon University
http://www.odannyboy.com

4 Mar 2004 - 9:12am
Dave Malouf
2005

Dan, I'm glad you put examples in there b/c I think it helps me a lot to
shape what I don't want.

Your examples are about interacting with the GUI directly ... I think ...
And maybe this doesn't make sense ... I want something below the GUI. The
GUI is that presentation of the structure and behavior and I want to map the
behavior as separate from the presentation.

Lets's see if I can come up w/ some examples:

Nouns:
list
input
selection
Form

Verbs:
create
Select
Submit
Edit
Enter
Multi-select
Modify
Display
view

I know some of these sound like widget names, but I mean them in their more
generic meaning.

Also, some of these are meant to be the human and some of these are meant to
be the machine.

I think a task analysis is interesting, but the ones I have seen examples of
are more textual, narratives. Do people have examples of more pictoral
versions?

- dave

-----Original Message-----
From:
discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.
com] On Behalf Of Dan Saffer
Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2004 8:14 AM
To: David Heller
Cc: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: Re: [ID Discuss] Behavioral mapping?

I guess I'm trying to figure out what this sort of vocabulary would contain.
Stuff like:

NOUNS
button
slider
dial
etc

VERBS
push
turn
pull
display
reveal
etc

In the past, I've simply captured these in a task flow. But maybe there is
some value in having an set of standardized items for each one. You could
see things like the number of buttons you have at a glance, for example. It
would have to be expandable of course, and we'd have to come up with some
stencils for Visio and Omnigraffle (at least). Sounds like a project for
someone...

Dan

Dan Saffer
M.Des. Candidate, Interaction Design
Carnegie Mellon University
http://www.odannyboy.com

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4 Mar 2004 - 9:41am
Dan Saffer
2003

Anything that would be useful to the community would have to address
both front and back end (or at least connections to the back end), I
would think.

Are you talking about something like UMLi?

http://www.cs.man.ac.uk/img/umli/index.html

Dan

4 Mar 2004 - 12:05pm
Adlin, Tamara
2004

Hi Dave,
Yes, i think it's very valuable. not sure my method fits exactly what you're looking for, but i've developed processes called 'reality mapping' and 'design mapping.' These maps express the current experience, from end to end, of a person working towards a goal. Reality maps express the way they do things today, using existing tools, and design maps are explorations of the way they could do things using new tools and technologies, or re-arranged process flows.

I use sticky notes to do these mapping exercises. reality mapping sessions involve the users or SMEs. we get a huge sheet of paper, label it with the task or goal (eg, 'sally makes a peanut butter sandwich') and start mapping. the mapping process uses four colors of sticky notes: Blue are for steps or facts, green are for assumptions or conditions, yellow are for questions, and pink are for design ideas. Creating a map involves breaking down the experience such that the blue stickies (with short descriptions on them, like 'sally opens the bag of bread') are arrayed horizontally, with the other colors 'hanging' from teh blue stickies as appropriate (e.g., maybe an assumption that says 'sally doesn't worry if the bread is fresh'). Yellow stickies are critical to avoid meeting 'ratholes'--when people in the meeting aren't sure what happens or have different opinions, you 'yellow sticky' it and get on with mapping.

using the same colors, you can create design maps that explore alternative experiences very quickly and easily.

i have some more information on this process if you are interested. i find it's great as a tool for facilitating user interviews and for getting a design team to work together on brainstorms and detailed process flows. also, it's very visual and interactive, and therefore more 'usable' in my opinion than long scenarios. An additional benefit: UIs tend to 'fall out' of design maps. once you nail the experience you're trying to support, the ui decisions come pretty easily.
Tamara

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of David Heller
Sent: Wednesday, March 03, 2004 2:53 PM
To: discuss at interactiondesigners.com
Subject: [ID Discuss] Behavioral mapping?

Hey there,

I was wondering if anyone had any tools or references for how to behaviorally map out an interaction design? In this case it is of an existing product.

What I want to do is get to the core semantics and syntax that makes up the behavior in such a way that we can go back and re-arrange the behavior into a new structure and give that behavior a new presentation.

The closest thing I have found is the Visual Vocabulary of Jesse James Garrett, but its not quite complete enough for me in its set of nouns, verbs, adjectivies and adverbs. Or more accurrately, I'm not able to translate with it and thus it isn't a good rosetta stone for me.
http://jjg.net/ia/visvocab/

What do other people use for similar types of tasks? Is this exercise even valuable?

-- dave

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11 Mar 2004 - 2:44pm
CD Evans
2004

Sorry I missed this one earlier eh..

Here's a paper I like reading before I try to map out a behaviour logic
stream (insert your own latin there).

"Canonical.pdf" into google or it's on their site under canonical:

http://www.foruse.com/articles/

It's a bit sticky mad, but it's got some really good ideas..

CD Evans

On 4 Mar 2004, at 17:05, Adlin, Tamara wrote:

> Hi Dave,
> Yes, i think it's very valuable. not sure my method fits exactly what
> you're looking for, but i've developed processes called 'reality
> mapping' and 'design mapping.'  These maps express the current
> experience, from end to end, of a person working towards a goal.
> Reality maps express the way they do things today, using existing
> tools, and design maps are explorations of the way they could do
> things using new tools and technologies, or re-arranged process flows.
>  
> I use sticky notes to do these mapping exercises. reality mapping
> sessions involve the users or SMEs. we get a huge sheet of paper,
> label it with the task or goal (eg, 'sally makes a peanut butter
> sandwich') and start mapping. the mapping process uses four colors of
> sticky notes: Blue are for steps or facts, green are for assumptions
> or conditions, yellow are for questions, and pink are for design
> ideas. Creating a map involves breaking down the experience such that
> the blue stickies (with short descriptions on them, like 'sally opens
> the bag of bread') are arrayed horizontally, with the other colors
> 'hanging' from teh blue stickies as appropriate (e.g., maybe an
> assumption that says 'sally doesn't worry if the bread is fresh').
> Yellow stickies are critical to avoid meeting 'ratholes'--when people
> in the meeting aren't sure what happens or have different opinions,
> you 'yellow sticky' it and get on with mapping.
>  
> using the same colors, you can create design maps that explore
> alternative experiences very quickly and easily.
>  
> i have some more information on this process if you are interested. i
> find it's great as a tool for facilitating user interviews and for
> getting a design team to work together on brainstorms and detailed
> process flows. also, it's very visual and interactive, and therefore
> more 'usable' in my opinion than long scenarios. An additional
> benefit: UIs tend to 'fall out' of design maps. once you nail the
> experience you're trying to support, the ui decisions come pretty
> easily.
> Tamara
> -----Original Message-----
> From:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-
> bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-interactiondesigners.com-
> bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com]On Behalf OfDavid Heller
> Sent:Wednesday, March 03, 2004 2:53 PM
> To:discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> Subject:[ID Discuss] Behavioral mapping?
>
> Hey there,
>  
> I was wondering if anyone had any tools or references for how to
> behaviorally map out an interaction design? In this case it is of an
> existing product.
>  
> What I want to do is get to the core semantics and syntax that makes
> up the behavior in such a way that we can go back and re-arrange the
> behavior into a new structure and give that behavior a new
> presentation.
>  
> The closest thing I have found is the Visual Vocabulary of Jesse James
> Garrett, but its not quite complete enough for me in its set of nouns,
> verbs, adjectivies and adverbs. Or more accurrately, I'm not able to
> translate with it and thus it isn't a good rosetta stone for me.
> http://jjg.net/ia/visvocab/
>  
> What do other people use for similar types of tasks? Is this exercise
> even valuable?
>  
> -- dave
> _______________________________________________
> Interaction Design Discussion List
> discuss at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> to change your options (unsubscribe or set digest):
> http://discuss.interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Questions: lists at interactiondesigners.com
> --
> Announcement Online List (discussion list members get announcements
> already)
> http://interactiondesigners.com/announceList/
> --
> http://interactiondesigners.com/

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