Fwd: [JOB] UX Principal Consultant, NJ | 140-160k (Relo)

16 Feb 2006 - 5:57pm
8 years ago
10 replies
689 reads
Louise Ferguson
2005

On 16/02/06, Beau Gould <beau at superiorss.com> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Principal Consultant, User Experience, NJ | 140-160k
>
> ****ATTN CANDIDATES: Please consider yourself a UX Guru before applying
> for this job. My client has seen all the top dogs in the NY/NJ area and is
> still not satisfied. Please have ALL of the required skills and
> education. My client will relocate the right candidate****

So
How many staff does the 'Principal Consultant get?
Who is ch***'s name wants to work in Morristown, NJ (and where the heck in
the boondocks is that, anyway)?
And wouldn't any so-called guru be running their own show very competently
anyway, with no interest in such posts, thank you very much? (headhunters
tend to admit this is the case, when they call in search of heads)

Sorry, but I find the intro on this job post absolutely and utterly
hilarious.

Louise Ferguson
London (UK)

Role:
> The Principal Consultant enters the engagement early,

Comments

16 Feb 2006 - 7:30pm
John Vaughan - ...
2004

Louise

Your response to this particular company's pompous jobposting is absolutely
on-target - and for additional reasons you can't imagine.

FYI: Morristown is about 35 miles w/ of Da Big Apple and nearby there's
also the fairly substantial suburban donut of tech firms that often surround
a major city. So it's not quite as g*d-forsaken as you imagine. Though it
is ...... well .... the suburbs.

BTW: Historically, Morristown served as headquarters to George Washington
whilst he was kicking butt on a certain unnamed European ex-power.

love, John

>> ****ATTN CANDIDATES: Please consider yourself a UX Guru before applying
>> for this job. My client has seen all the top dogs in the NY/NJ area and
>> is
>> still not satisfied. Please have ALL of the required skills and
>> education. My client will relocate the right candidate****
>
>
>
> So
> How many staff does the 'Principal Consultant get?
> Who is ch***'s name wants to work in Morristown, NJ (and where the heck
> in
> the boondocks is that, anyway)?
> And wouldn't any so-called guru be running their own show very competently
> anyway, with no interest in such posts, thank you very much? (headhunters
> tend to admit this is the case, when they call in search of heads)
>
> Sorry, but I find the intro on this job post absolutely and utterly
> hilarious.
>
> Louise Ferguson
> London (UK)

16 Feb 2006 - 10:02pm
jbellis
2005

Louise,

Your observation...

"And wouldn't any so-called guru be running their own show very
competently..."

..echoes my frequent reaction to such ads. I heard one brilliant salesman
refer to such ads as "they want Christ with a briefcase" [hey, you started
the politically incorrect references, not me]. But if one looks deeper, this
one distinguishes itself and is fascinating. First, they're saying up front
that they'll pay very well for Consultant Jesus and second, notice that
nowhere do they expect this person to also code the 400 IE hacks to CSS or
sketch out pastels from 3-7 AM after whiling away the workday fulfilling
every other job slot known to corporatedom. (Many such posts stop at no less
than insisting that Leonardo is a mere impostor if he cannot paint like
Michelangelo and theorize like Newton. How dare he show himself at our
doorstep!)

Finally, notice, despite the exorbitant, Anderson-esque exhortatating(?), it
does a pretty insightful job of enumerating the high-level soft skills and
limiting factors in usability evangelizing. Whoever shot out those bullet
points has seen plenty of projects go nowhere, I'll bet.

Love to keep chatting, but I have a letter to write.

"Dearest Beau...."

www.jackBellis.com, www.UsabilityInstitute.com

----- Original Message -----
To: "Louise Ferguson" <louise.ferguson at gmail.com>; "IxD Mailinglist"
<discuss at ixdg.org>
>> And wouldn't any so-called guru be running their own show very
>> competently
>> anyway, with no interest in such posts, thank you very much? (headhunters
>> tend to admit this is the case, when they call in search of heads)

17 Feb 2006 - 8:15am
Lada Gorlenko
2004

jc> Finally, notice, despite the exorbitant, Anderson-esque exhortatating(?), it
jc> does a pretty insightful job of enumerating the high-level soft skills and
jc> limiting factors in usability evangelizing. Whoever shot out those bullet
jc> points has seen plenty of projects go nowhere, I'll bet.

My first reaction to the job post was similar to that of Louise:
"Good luck searching". However...

Running your own business, even a successful one, you are involved in
logistics/operational side of it: legwork to find clients, keeping an
eye on accounting (providing you are successful enough not to do DIY),
and so on. Ultimately, you are not doing the UX work full-time.

If someone gives a guru all the authority they want, pays the price
pretty comparable to that of a successful independent UX consultant
(how many of them get more than 160K?), gives basic job security (at
least, you know when you next paycheck is coming in) and takes away
the mundane responsibilities of owning a business - why not?

Lada

17 Feb 2006 - 8:28am
Dave Malouf
2005

On 2/17/06 8:15 AM, "Lada Gorlenko" <lada at acm.org> wrote:

> If someone gives a guru all the authority they want, pays the price
> pretty comparable to that of a successful independent UX consultant
> (how many of them get more than 160K?), gives basic job security (at
> least, you know when you next paycheck is coming in) and takes away
> the mundane responsibilities of owning a business - why not?

Personal brand equity.

When you become an innie as a "guru" you loose the focus of being able to
create more brand equity. You can't manage your own priorities, as the
priorities for the larger company take over.

We know what company this is by geography. LDS has been doing portal design
for quite some time. They have been dedicated to doing good IA. But they
have NEVER supported a "superstar" that they will allow to stand out as
greater than the LDS brand itself. There are very few corporations of that
size that would allow that and for good reason. It doesn't scale. You can't
guarantee that this person is going to be on every account giving personal
attention.

Also, the money isn't that great. Sorry to burst a bubble here, but many
non-Gurus are making within reach of that salary already. If I was a Guru
(and who do we mean by Guru?) I would need a lot of guarantees and a lot
more money.

How much non-client travel can I do? Will writing be part of my time? Will
teaching? Will I be expected to be on the advisory boards of other
organizations? Basically, how will LDS guarantee that I will keep my guru
status?

I do agree that LDS put out some good vision for expectations, but I do
think it is a faulty proposition to look for a "guru". There are many people
who have not reached out for creating major brand equity who probably would
be just as good if not better.

I DO think their location is a detriment to the cause of GURU gathering.
It's an hour by train + to get out there from the city and that is only if
you live in Manhattan. If you actually do live in Jersey ... Well, its
Jersey and what Guru of experience design is going to settle for that
experience? (sorry, I just couldn't resist!)

-- dave

-- dave

David Heller
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixdg.org/
Dave (at) ixdg (dot) org
Dave (at) synapticburn (dot) com
AIM: bolinhanyc || Y!: dave_ux || MSN: hippiefunk(at)hotmail.com || GTalk:
dheller(at)gmail.com

17 Feb 2006 - 10:10am
Lada Gorlenko
2004

DH> Personal brand equity.

DH> When you become an innie as a "guru" you loose the focus of being able to
DH> create more brand equity. You can't manage your own priorities, as the
DH> priorities for the larger company take over.

Ah! This is REALLY interesting.

The way I see it (ok, there is some distance ahead before I can claim
the status ;-) ) is as this. If I am a Guru (a luminary, a visionary,
a highly respectable name in my profession), I have two options:

1. Be an outie and create my own brand.

How big an impact can I make? How much UX outies, even the most
successful ones, are known outside the UX world? I have my deepest
respect for people we all look up to in our profession, but if they
are outies, they won't change the world. They can change their
profession, but this is where it will ultimately stop.

2. Be an innie and shape the brand I work for.

If I work for a brand (especially for a household name), my influence
is different. The challenge is to get to the level of influence
*within* the brand where I become among those who shape brand
priorities. The bigger the brand, the more difficult it is to get to
this position. However, if you can make it and make the brand follow
you, the overall impact of your thought leadership will be much bigger.

How about being an innie who turns Microsoft into a company producing
the best User Experience in the world? Or IBM? Or General Motors?

I am on the quest; catch up, if you can :-)

Lada

17 Feb 2006 - 11:31am
John Vaughan - ...
2004

As regards the original posting: It's intriguing that LDS has deliberately
chosen the "G" word to frame their criteria. However, the bullets in their
jobreq appear to be nothing more than "the usual suspects"
(well-articulated, but nothing particularly new or different). One must
wonder how much committment LDS has to taking advantage of - and
supporting - a real, fully-featured internal guru/teacher/guide such as Lada
describes the "innie" role.

If LDS really wants Lada's guru (and I love it - You go, girl), wouldn't we
have seen something more about that in their posting? Not that they
wouldn't appreciate it as a freebie, but it just ain't in the job
description. Oh yeah, and don't forget to nuance your willingness to lead
vs. being a "team player". As Dave noted: DH> "But they (LDS) have NEVER
supported a "superstar" that they will allow to stand out as greater than
the LDS brand itself." ). Excessive enthusiasm could mean early
retirement...

Oh, Dave, you cut me to the quick: DH> "If you actually do live in Jersey
... Well, its (sic) Jersey and what Guru of experience design is going to
settle for that experience?" (mumble....)

John

LG> "I am on the quest; catch up, if you can :-)" ...... Don Quixote de La
Mancha

17 Feb 2006 - 11:05am
Todd Warfel
2003

I almost fell out of my chair laughing at this one once I read
Microsoft. It would take a miracle of miracles for someone to have
enough weight at MS to get them to the point where they're producing
world class UX. First, you'd have to get them to care - no, I mean
really care about UX, security, fewer features that are baked longer.

IBM is doing some pretty good consulting work, they actually have a
UX practice that they listen to. It's not great from what I can
gather from clients we've worked with and those I've spoken w/who
worked inside that group, but they're working on it.

Now GM, well, how about the entire auto industry period!

The only person I can think of as an innie who's known outside our UX
realm is Jonathan Ives.

Can anyone think of anyone else?

On Feb 17, 2006, at 10:10 AM, Lada Gorlenko wrote:

> How about being an innie who turns Microsoft into a company producing
> the best User Experience in the world? Or IBM? Or General Motors?

Cheers!

Todd R. Warfel
Partner, Design & Usability Specialist
Messagefirst | designing and usability consulting
--------------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (607) 339-9640
Email: todd at messagefirst.com
AIM: twarfel at mac.com
Blog: http://toddwarfel.com
--------------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

19 Feb 2006 - 2:28am
penguinstorm
2005

On Feb-16-2006, at 2:57 PM, Louise Ferguson wrote:

> Who is ch***'s name wants to work in Morristown, NJ (and where the
> heck in
> the boondocks is that, anyway)?

Who is ch***'s name wants to work in London, UK?

Just because you don't know where it is (and probably haven't heard
of it before) doesn't make it the boondocks.
--
Scott Nelson
skot (at) penguinstorm (dot) com
http://www.penguinstorm.com/

skype. skot.nelson

19 Feb 2006 - 3:47pm
John Vaughan - ...
2004

MORRISTOWN : Center of the Universe

Skot Nelson > Just because you don't know where it is (and probably haven't
heard of it before) doesn't make it the boondocks.

Okaaaaay.... Perhaps this thread might evolve into a discussion of
"location, location, location" vs. virtuality, and how they apply to us IxD
folks as consultants, innies and service shop owners.

In the meantime, here's a few factoids that may put "Morristown, NJ" into
context:

* It's about 30 miles west of NYC.
* The highways running from the 3 main westward outlets from NYC (the
Holland and Lincoln Tunnels, the George Washington Bridge) all converge just
about 5-10 miles north of Morristown.
* They are crossed there by Rte 287, which is the primary "ring road" around
NYC.Morristown lies on Rte 287.
* As we all (should) know, high-tech development usually occurs along such
major communication routes around urban centers.
* During the 80's (until breakup) ATT's headquarters, tech centers and R&D
offices were all clustered in the area just south of Morristown (along 287).
* IBM headqarters and development facilites are about 25 miles to the north
(along 287).
* Because it's on the outer cusp of the urban ring, you also have easy
access to one of the major NYC area airports from Morristown.
* Its strategic location relative to several major cities and communication
routes is, of course, why General Washington chose it as his headquarters
whilst kicking butt on the guys from London.
* Not suprisingly, Morris County contains many affluent towns and is, in
fact, statistically one of the richest areas in the US.

Disclaimer:
After 20 years pioneering a loft in NYC, I moved to scenic Lake Hiawatha
(It's at the highway nexus just to the north of Morristown). We can discuss
the advantages and drawbacks of each, if you wish.

Invitation/Challenge:
>From a practical perspective, the Morristown area's location is a great
opportunity for quick & easy access to the substantial Northern NJ / NYC
exurban market. Currently LDS is (to my knowledge) the only major UX
service bureau presence there. Any takers?

John Vaughan
The Communication Studio LLC
email: vaughan1 at optonline.net
website: http://www.jcvtcs.com
115 Minnehaha Blvd
Lake Hiawatha, NJ 07034
Voice: (973) 265-4684
Fax: (917) 591-8667
Cell: 973-886-1269

19 Feb 2006 - 11:31am
John Vaughan - ...
2004

MORRISTOWN Redux

Skot Nelson > Just because you don't know where it is (and probably haven't
heard of it before) doesn't make it the boondocks.

Okaaaaay.... Perhaps this thread might evolve into a discussion of
"location, location, location" vs. virtuality, as they apply to us IxD folks
as consultants, innies and service shop owners.

In the meantime, here's a few factoids that may put "Morristown, NJ" into
context:

It's about 30 miles west of NYC.
* The highways running from the 3 main westward outlets from NYC (the
Holland and Lincoln Tunnels, the George Washington Bridge) all converge just
about 5-10 miles north of Morristown.
* They are crossed there by Rte 287, which is the primary "ring road" around
NYC.
* Morristown lies on Rte 287.
* As we all (should) know, high-tech development usually occurs along such
communication routes around urban centers.
* During the 80's (until breakup) ATT's headquarters, tech centers and R&D
offices were all clustered in the area just south of Morristown (along 287).
* IBM headqarters and development facilites are about 25 miles to the north
(along 287).
* Because it's on the outer cusp of the urban ring, you also have easy
access to one of the major NYC area airports from Morristown.
* Its strategic location relative to several major cities and communication
routes is, of course, why General Washington chose it as his headquarters
whilst kicking butt on the guys from London.
* Not suprisingly, Morris County contains many affluent towns and is, in
fact, statistically one of the richest areas in the US.

Disclaimer:
After 20 years pioneering a loft in NYC, I moved to scenic Lake Hiawatha
(It's at the highway nexus just to the north of Morristown). We can discuss
the advantages and drawbacks of each, if you wish.

Invitation/Challenge:
>From a practical perspective, the Morristown area's location is a great
opportunity for quick & easy access to the substantial Northern NJ / NYC
exurban market. Currently LDS is (to my knowledge) the only major UX
service bureau presence there. Any takers?

John Vaughan
The Communication Studio LLC
email: vaughan1 at optonline.net
website: http://www.jcvtcs.com
115 Minnehaha Blvd
Lake Hiawatha, NJ 07034
Voice: (973) 265-4684
Fax: (917) 591-8667
Cell: 973-886-1269

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