Google SearchScapes

9 Jan 2006 - 7:12pm
8 years ago
8 replies
605 reads
Tom Ollar
2005

We all know how Google displays search results.

But is anyone else getting tired of clicking on the numbers at the bottom of
the page?

Perhaps a "landscape" result for various keyword combos?

Something like this, only, well, arranged.

http://www.milliondollarhomepage.com/

Just a thought...

Tom Ollar
Evergreen, Colorado

Comments

9 Jan 2006 - 11:18pm
Mal
2005

I thought this might be of interest.

This online test app ( Shockwave ) allows the user to search for google
images, and returns the results on the wall.

Click on the google button in the bottom right corner.

http://www.candointeractive.com/art/gallery/masters

We are very much focused on the 3D UI interaction, and re-using existing
2D web navigation skills within a 3D environment, which is something
that will become more prevelant with the next introduction of Windows (
Vista ).

Regards...
Mal

10 Jan 2006 - 3:05am
Baldo
2005

Nice example of something new is the "Flickr Clusters":

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/computer/clusters/

> Perhaps a "landscape" result for various keyword combos?

10 Jan 2006 - 11:04am
jstanford
2003

This doesn't really look like a new view to me. This just looks like a bunch
of photos on a page because the best way to scan photos is by putting a
bunch of thumbnails on a page. And a cluster is in essence a saved and
grouping of search results, right? Am I missing something?

Julie
_____________________________________
Julie Stanford
Principal, Sliced Bread Design | www.slicedbreaddesign.com
650-799-7225

> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On
> Behalf Of Baldo
> Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2006 1:05 AM
> To: Tom Ollar
> Cc: discuss at ixdg.org; discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Google SearchScapes
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant
> quoted material.]
>
> Nice example of something new is the "Flickr Clusters":
>
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/computer/clusters/
>
>
> > Perhaps a "landscape" result for various keyword combos?
> ________________________________________________________________
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10 Jan 2006 - 11:48am
Austin Govella
2004

On 1/10/06, Julie Stanford <julie at slicedbreaddesign.com> wrote:
> This doesn't really look like a new view to me. This just looks like a bunch
> of photos on a page because the best way to scan photos is by putting a
> bunch of thumbnails on a page. And a cluster is in essence a saved and
> grouping of search results, right? Am I missing something?

Depends on what you're looking for. The rpesentation isn't anything
new. People have been clusterring like pictures since they started
scrawling on cave walls.

The newness comes from the approach, the strategy, and the thought
behind the design. That the resulting interface looks like other
interfaces may be more a factor of human culture.

Of course, this assumes the approach, the strategy, and the thought
behind the design is new...

--
Austin Govella
Thinking & Making: IA, UX, and IxD
http://thinkingandmaking.com
austin.govella at gmail.com

10 Jan 2006 - 11:26am
Todd Roberts
2005

Like Grokker does, or something different? www.grokker.com, enter your
search terms then switch to the zoomable map view. There's also a demo at
http://www.grokker.com/research/umich/.

On 1/9/06, Tom Ollar <tom at blix.net> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> We all know how Google displays search results.
>
> But is anyone else getting tired of clicking on the numbers at the bottom
> of
> the page?
>
> Perhaps a "landscape" result for various keyword combos?
>
> Something like this, only, well, arranged.
>
> http://www.milliondollarhomepage.com/
>
> Just a thought...
>
> Tom Ollar
> Evergreen, Colorado
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> List Guidelines ............ http://listguide.ixda.org/
> List Help .................. http://listhelp.ixda.org/
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

10 Jan 2006 - 2:22pm
Andrew Otwell
2004

> This doesn't really look like a new view to me. This just looks like
> a bunch of photos on a page because the best way to scan photos is by
> putting a bunch of thumbnails on a page. And a cluster is in essence
> a saved and grouping of search results, right? Am I missing
> something?

In fact a Flickr cluster is an automatically-determined grouping, which
is much more interesting than a hand-picked set when you have millions
of photos like they do.

It's based on tag combinations, so photos that share the same tag "fish"
can be grouped into other relevant sets, like fish-for-dinner or
fish-in-aquariums or fish-in-the-market. Considering how simple the idea
is, it's quite effective.

10 Jan 2006 - 3:00pm
Tom Ollar
2005

Wow. Didn't know it existed - thanks!

First, it's gorgeous.

Cursory testing shows the basic problem with generated bubble diagrams,
homogeneity takes the human ability to orient right out of the picture.

Also the zooming is quite disorienting. I don't know where I am to start
with, then I zoom into the confusion.

Searchscapes would necessarily need an organic touch to be truly effective.
California can't be on the west coast one day, then on the east the next.

Yahoo's categorization of web pages combined with a simple, straight forward
graphical landscape that doesn't change as much as it evolves - that way I
feel at home the second, third, fourth time I check those same search
results.

Tom Ollar
Evergreen, Colorado

11 Jan 2006 - 8:32am
Todd Roberts
2005

I tend to agree that Grokker is a better idea than it is an implementation
at this point. In fact, from what I have seen of graphical search result
displays whether they are bubble-based or "geographic" is that they lack the
orientation you speak to. There is nothing in the bubbles, or on a 3-D "map"
of results that tells you where to look for what you want. You really have
to search the whole visual field unless you know how the underlying cluster
+ presentation formulae are working. The bibliographic search maps I've seen
are good for pattern recognition, e.g. what topic has a lot written about
it, but aren't as good for looking for a specific item. If there was some
way to represent a multidimensional vector of each result item in a way we
mortals could comprehend it would provide more of the orientation that's
needed. Note that this is a problem with uncategorized lists of search
results as well, and the categories that Yahoo uses, and that Northern Light
was using back in the day, help somewhat but don't account for all
dimensions of a search result.

On 1/10/06, Tom Ollar <tom at blix.net> wrote:
>
> Wow. Didn't know it existed - thanks!
>
> First, it's gorgeous.
>
> Cursory testing shows the basic problem with generated bubble diagrams,
> homogeneity takes the human ability to orient right out of the picture.
>
> Also the zooming is quite disorienting. I don't know where I am to start
> with, then I zoom into the confusion.
>
> Searchscapes would necessarily need an organic touch to be truly
> effective.
> California can't be on the west coast one day, then on the east the next.
>
> Yahoo's categorization of web pages combined with a simple, straight
> forward
> graphical landscape that doesn't change as much as it evolves - that way I
> feel at home the second, third, fourth time I check those same search
> results.
>
> Tom Ollar
> Evergreen, Colorado
>
>

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