Revamp from V1 to V2

7 Dec 2005 - 8:31am
8 years ago
2 replies
314 reads
Suresh JV
2004

Hi All,

I've an opportunity to revamp an enterprise application already being
used by several customers, with significant room for improvement in
user experience. What should be general approach for the same?
Is there a systematic way? Where do I start?

I would like to know how others have handled the same.
All that limits on Time, budget & resource hold good.

PS: I googled and came with this...
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* Identify the problems

* Prioritize them based on impact to use

* Prioritize them based on time/cost benefits of fixing the problems

* Design and implement the fixes
http://www.humanfactors.com/downloads/sep03.asp
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Regards,
Suresh JV.

Comments

7 Dec 2005 - 9:09am
Dave Malouf
2005

Hi Suresh,

I think the outline you had is a good start but doesn't really tell you HOW,
right?

Identify the problems. So you are convinced that there is room for
improvement.
List all the ways that you know this
Go out and do usability tests on the existing product, do on-site
observations, talk to the help desk/customer support people.
Get a roadmap from the business side about where the product is going

First things first ... Before you begin to analyze it (or even as a first
step to analyzing it) I find just jumping into a prototype just based on the
empathy I achieved to push the project faster and furhter than anything
else. Its not that you aren't going to go back, but there is nothing as
useful as having a prototype to reflect off of and get interpretations and
feedback to help with your analysis.

I don't like this "prioritize stuff". Eventually you have to pick and choose
what is going to go into the app, but you should be thinking a lot higher
level for a lot longer period. Jumping from list problems to prioritize
them, misses, well ... The design phase. Showing something can help make or
break a decision process.

The thing that is important to realize is that design is an analysis process
in and of itself. Design is not a deliverable, but a process that leads to
deliverables.

I usually do what I have called "concept car" designs, modeled after the car
industry where you just apply your vision to the product. Like I said above,
envisioning a problem set and setting a distance course really helps people
begin to understand a narrative about the application, what you think is
wrong with it and how you plan on dealing with these problems over the next
cycles of iterations.

Oh! Remember that when doing enterprise software re-designs that you don't'
have to do everything at once. Just have a plan for getting where you want
to go.

Make sure your partnerships/relationships with business and technology are
on very strong ground and keep them looped in with your progress.

Good luck! ... I'm head deep into the same project right now for my company.

Oh! Don't be afraid of having little direction.
Create assumptions, document them, validate them, iterate ... That's mine
and my boss's mantra right now.

-- dave

On 12/7/05 8:31 AM, "Suresh J V" <suresh.jv at ranal.com> wrote:

> * Identify the problems
>
> * Prioritize them based on impact to use
>
> * Prioritize them based on time/cost benefits of fixing the problems
>
> * Design and implement the fixes
> http://www.humanfactors.com/downloads/sep03.asp

-- dave

David Heller
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixdg.org/
Dave (at) ixdg (dot) org
Dave (at) synapticburn (dot) com
AIM: bolinhanyc || Y!: dave_ux || MSN: hippiefunk at hotmail.com

7 Dec 2005 - 10:37am
Peter Bagnall
2003

My approach would be to spend some time revisiting the purpose of the
system, and getting to understand the users, developing personas etc,
and then to think in very high level terms what solution you would go
for if you could start from scratch. Don't get too detailed, keep it
conceptual. Of course, you probably can't redo from scratch, but if you
don't think about it you might only fix little detailed interaction
problems and miss more fundamental issues, such as the system doesn't
actually do the job it's meant to be doing! ;-) Doing this analysis can
take time, since you really need to talk to users to understand their
concerns (but not just bug-lists or whinges about the current system,
it should be more about how they do their job more generally). However,
you'll get benefit even from just talking to a few users which is often
not too time consuming.

Once you've done all that you'll have a much better idea of where you
should be starting, because you'll have a better idea of where you want
to end up. What's more, if you do manage to address fundamental
problems you're much more likely to end up with something that users
see as a real improvement, rather than just a slight improvement.

You could argue that all that falls under "identify the problems"! The
rest of the list you've put down seems pretty reasonable once you've
done the analysis.

Cheers
--Pete

On 7 Dec 2005, at 13:31, Suresh J V wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Hi All,
>
> I've an opportunity to revamp an enterprise application already being
> used by several customers, with significant room for improvement in
> user experience. What should be general approach for the same?
> Is there a systematic way? Where do I start?
>
> I would like to know how others have handled the same.
> All that limits on Time, budget & resource hold good.
>
> PS: I googled and came with this...
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> ------------
> * Identify the problems
>
> * Prioritize them based on impact to use
>
> * Prioritize them based on time/cost benefits of fixing the problems
>
> * Design and implement the fixes
> http://www.humanfactors.com/downloads/sep03.asp
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> ------------
>
>
> Regards,
> Suresh JV.
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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----------------------------------------------------------
As long as people believe in absurdities they will continue
to commit atrocities.
Francois Marie Arouet (Voltaire), 1694 - 1778

Peter Bagnall - http://people.surfaceeffect.com/pete/

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