Re-thinking the obvious ... a new London Underground map

7 Dec 2005 - 12:13am
8 years ago
5 replies
1898 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

http://www.oskarlin.com/2005/11/29/time-travel/

I love this! Ok, its a map ... not very interactive, but it is very
contextual and re-thinking user motivation in terms of "how do I get
from point A to point B?"

Taking the London Underground map and re-drawing it so that time as
opposed to distance is the determiner of line length!!!!

TIME!!! What is more IxD than playing the element of TIME.

Too cool!

-- dave

--
David Heller
E: dheller (at) gmail (dot) com
W: www (dot) synapticburn (dot) com

Comments

7 Dec 2005 - 8:52am
Lada Gorlenko
2004

DH> http://www.oskarlin.com/2005/11/29/time-travel/
DH> TIME!!! What is more IxD than playing the element of TIME.

DH> Too cool!

Cool, but let me through in a couple of necessary additions

1. Dynamic updates.

So far, the map is static and based on the *average* time of travel.
Anyone who travels on the tube at different hours knows that the
*actual* time varies greatly. Your travel time may be as little as 15
mins at rush hour and as long as 40 late at night, if you have to wait
for a train at each change. Different lines have timetables of
different consistency. Also, there are repairs, delays, etc.

If the map could be dynamically updated at regular intervals, I know
many people who would pay a subscription charge to get it.

2. Linking other public transport timetables to the tube map.

London has about a dozen of major train stations (connecting it to the
rest of the country) and a couple of dozens of smaller ones
(connecting it to suburbs). Shorter travel is not the only desirable
option, despite what the guy thinks. On a winter night, I'd rather
spend extra 15 mins on a tube, warm and in a soft tube chair with a
book, rather than turning blue-ish on an open train platform waiting
for my next train home (beautiful airy-fairy train stations of the
late 19th century can be darn cold and only have metallic benches).
Besides, British trains are known for departing whenever they like,
not whenever the timetable specifies.

A tube map advising me on timetable/delays of other means of
scheduled transport would be invaluable to outside-London commuters.

Anyone to invest in the idea?

Lada

7 Dec 2005 - 1:12pm
niklasw
2005

So... would the graphics then also be dynamic and change size/colour/shape
based on the delays on the different lines? And also you'd have the gray
outer shapes resembling an amoeba. Finally you could have those 'come and go
as they like' trains to be viruses infecting the system.

And then you'd actually end up with something somewhat depicting the living
organism that a subway system really is ;)

--Niklas

On 07/12/05, Lada Gorlenko <lada at acm.org> wrote:
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> DH> http://www.oskarlin.com/2005/11/29/time-travel/
> DH> TIME!!! What is more IxD than playing the element of TIME.
>
> DH> Too cool!
>
> Cool, but let me through in a couple of necessary additions
>
> 1. Dynamic updates.
>
> So far, the map is static and based on the *average* time of travel.
> Anyone who travels on the tube at different hours knows that the
> *actual* time varies greatly. Your travel time may be as little as 15
> mins at rush hour and as long as 40 late at night, if you have to wait
> for a train at each change. Different lines have timetables of
> different consistency. Also, there are repairs, delays, etc.
>
> If the map could be dynamically updated at regular intervals, I know
> many people who would pay a subscription charge to get it.
>
> 2. Linking other public transport timetables to the tube map.
>
> London has about a dozen of major train stations (connecting it to the
> rest of the country) and a couple of dozens of smaller ones
> (connecting it to suburbs). Shorter travel is not the only desirable
> option, despite what the guy thinks. On a winter night, I'd rather
> spend extra 15 mins on a tube, warm and in a soft tube chair with a
> book, rather than turning blue-ish on an open train platform waiting
> for my next train home (beautiful airy-fairy train stations of the
> late 19th century can be darn cold and only have metallic benches).
> Besides, British trains are known for departing whenever they like,
> not whenever the timetable specifies.
>
> A tube map advising me on timetable/delays of other means of
> scheduled transport would be invaluable to outside-London commuters.
>
> Anyone to invest in the idea?
>
> Lada
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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7 Dec 2005 - 2:21pm
Wendy Fischer
2004

What would be great would be somehow incorporating a way to tell the user what they need to buy in regards to a ticket if the they are making a connection between the Underground and another type of train that isn't covered by the underground system.

There's more than a few different train lines, and also given current work on certain lines due to the bombings, and rerouting between the underground/buses/trains it'd be great to know what the most economical choice is for a pass and what the best route to take is.

Also, does your project brings me to the history of the design of the map. It's actually based on electrical circuitry notation, designed by Harry Beck, an Underground Electrical draughtsman in 1933. It has remained true to the original over the years.

8 Dec 2005 - 3:35am
bruhns
2005

The Danish "S-trains" which is a local train system in the greater
Copenhagen area, actually tries something like this. See
<URL: http://byenspuls.dsb.dk/byens_puls/ByensPuls.html > (requires Java)
and they have also implemented a text messaging service that will tell
you about planned irregularities.

I have not been able to find out what a 10 minute delay actually
means, though. Since most of the lines are on a 10 minute schedule,
what does a general 10 minute delay mean? Sometimes it really means
that every train is 10 minutes late and at other times it just seem to
signify trains coming at random... but the system is pretty accurate,
so I can actually sit at work and see when I need to leave to catch
the next one.

BR,
Jakob

On 12/7/05, Niklas Wolkert <niklas.wolkert at gmail.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> So... would the graphics then also be dynamic and change size/colour/shape
> based on the delays on the different lines? And also you'd have the gray
> outer shapes resembling an amoeba. Finally you could have those 'come and go
> as they like' trains to be viruses infecting the system.
>
> And then you'd actually end up with something somewhat depicting the living
> organism that a subway system really is ;)
>
> --Niklas

8 Dec 2005 - 6:29am
Andrei Sedelnikov
2004

That map is really a good thing!

The author made it possible to see the travel time between near
stations and to estimate the travel time from his station to any other
(that zoned version). What this map does not have is the ability to
estimate the travel time between _any_ two stations.

Years ago I did a similar thing for the Moscow Undeground Map:

http://www.usabilist.de/seeking/ru/images/MoscowMetroMap.gif

Though the basic labels are in russian, one can notice the background
circles, depicting the 5-minute zones. So in order to estimate your
travel time, you can simply count the number of zones betwenn your
stations and multiply it by 5. It will be of course not an exact
value, but the precision is not required here.

It was possible to do with the Moscow Map basically only because it
has a dedicated center, so I believe to do the same for London is
nearly impossble, but why not to try?

Andrey
http://usabilist.de

On 12/7/05, Dave Heller <dheller at gmail.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> http://www.oskarlin.com/2005/11/29/time-travel/
>
> I love this! Ok, its a map ... not very interactive, but it is very
> contextual and re-thinking user motivation in terms of "how do I get
> from point A to point B?"
>
> Taking the London Underground map and re-drawing it so that time as
> opposed to distance is the determiner of line length!!!!
>
> TIME!!! What is more IxD than playing the element of TIME.
>
> Too cool!
>
> -- dave
>
> --
> David Heller
> E: dheller (at) gmail (dot) com
> W: www (dot) synapticburn (dot) com
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
> Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
> Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org
>

--
Andrei Sedelnikov
http://usabilist.de/

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