Antropmetric software

14 Nov 2005 - 2:33pm
8 years ago
2 replies
498 reads
Gerard
2005

Hej group,

This may be a little "off topic" but does anyone know about
antropemetric software that I can use in a student environment?

Regards,
Gerard
Netherlands

Comments

14 Nov 2005 - 3:10pm
Mitchell Gass
2004

At 11:33 AM 11/14/2005, you wrote:
>...does anyone know about antropemetric software that I can use in a
>student environment?

Gerard,

Open Ergonomics offers educational versions of its PeopleSize 2000
anthropometry software

http://www.openerg.com/psz.htm

Would these be appropriate?

Regards,

Mitchell Gass
uLab | PDA: Learning from Users | Designing with Users
Berkeley, CA 94707 USA
+1 510 525-6864 voice
+1 510 525-4246 fax
http://www.participatorydesign.com/

14 Nov 2005 - 4:34pm
Gerard Torenvliet
2004

Gerard wrote:
> This may be a little "off topic" but does anyone know about
> antropemetric software that I can use in a student environment?
>
Gerard:

The industry-leading solution for anthropometric analysis is Delmia
Human (formerly Safework). This application allows you to build models
of humans and workspaces, insert humans into those workspaces, and then
do various static and dynamic simulations (e.g., reach, vision, lifting,
collisions with other workers, etc.). Unfortunately, the learning curve
is very steep and it is probably very expensive. They may have academic
packages to make things a bit more affordable.
(http://www.delmia.com/gallery/pdf/DELMIA_V5Human.pdf)

Another leading package is SAMMIE. It looks to be as rich as Delmia and
my colleagues have used earlier versions very successfully. It is
developed out of the University of Loughborough, and has been used by
others in academia. This package may be your best bet.
(http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/cd/research/groups/erg/sammie/samver.htm)

The Technical University of Delft has a package called ADAPS. It was
developed in an academic environment, so they may be willing to allow
for free educational use. The environment doesn't seem to be as rich as
Delmia's Human Solution (line drawings vs. colour manikins) but it may
be appropriate to your project.
(http://www2.io.tudelft.nl/research/ergonomics/DA/content_14.php)

I would recommend *against* IPME for the type of work you are trying to
do. IPME is a great discrete event simulator, and can do a good job of
helping designers to understand cognitive workload issues, but doesn't
seem to have the chops for detailed ergonomic analyses.

I hope that helps.

Regards,
-Gerard, originally uit Holland

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