Physical Interaction Prototyping ToolkitRecommendations

8 Nov 2005 - 12:49pm
8 years ago
3 replies
395 reads
Anjali Arora, NYU
2004

For those of you interested in exploring physical computing, you must check
out Tom Igoe's blog at http://tigoe.net/pcomp/index.shtml. There's ton of
resources out there.

-Anjali

> I'm assuming you're aware of the Making Things TELEO modules? Great
> for tying the physical world to Flash.
>
> http://makingthings.com/
>
> -Jed
>

Comments

10 Nov 2005 - 4:57am
erez
2005

Hi,

I have worked with wiring platform that you mentioned and from my experience
this is a stable and relatively easy way to prototype. It allows to design a
stand alone prototype or one that will interface with your flash file. Last
year I designed a screen based flash game that was manipulated by unique TUI
I designed. I also designed a tile based light wall that allows children to
play simulation games.
There are few things that I think you have to learn. One would be to program
the microprocessor. In wiring there is a simplified version of java, called
wiring, and you can ask for the latest version on their website. The other
would be to design a proper electronic circuit, which is not too difficult,
but takes time eventually. Lastly is connecting the flash to the wiring
micro controller. There should be tutorials on their site.
In general the less support you need the less expensive the kit cost.
Phigits are relatively expensive but have very good support and are designed
for the less informed designers. It also means that things are causing less
problems.
This is an issue as with this level of prototyping problems are common and
can place the design process into a frustrating halt.

Erez Kikin-Gil | User Centric Innovation Designer

+44 (0) 791.402.1270

MSN : Erez at tiltool.com

IM/AOL: erezkikingil

Http://www.tiltool.com

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of d|b
Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2005 1:12 AM
To: IxD
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Physical Interaction Prototyping
ToolkitRecommendations

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

All,

I was inspired by some of the work that Smart Design showed during their
DUX'05 studio tour to renew my efforts to sell the idea of prototyping
physical interactions to some of TEAGUE's clients (we work primarily on
non-desktop consumer electronics products). Typically, we build high-end
appearance models to represent industrial design, and, separately, build
interactive simulations that run on a touch screen. This works well enough
for evaluation purposes in many cases, but, clearly, merging the hardware
and software models would result in higher quality feedback. Years ago, in
school (Stanford product design/HCI), I did a few of these projects by
hacking up keyboards and game devices to cannibalize their buttons, but now
it seems that there are a number of open source and commercial toolkits
available to lower the cost/increase the speed of physical interaction
prototyping. My question is: can anyone with experience with a particular
set of tools make a recommendation? My criteria are as follows:

1. Must work easily with Macromedia Director and/or Flash. These are our
standard tools, and we are not particularly motivated to learn something
new, like Java/Processing.

2. Must cost less than $500 for a typical hardware/software prototype (just
including the input hardware and the software).

3. Must work on a PC platform.

4. Would be nice if sensors could be networked/wireless.

Some of the links that I've dug up this afternoon include:

Wiring
http://wiring.org.co

Phidgets
http://www.phidgets.com

Calder toolkit http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~nx6/pubs/Lee_HWTK_DIS_04.pdf

Context Toolkit
http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~dey/context.html

DART
http://www.gvu.gatech.edu/dart/index.htm

iStuff
http://media.informatik.rwth-aachen.de/istuff/index.php

Papier-Mâché
http://guir.berkeley.edu/projects/papier-mache

Switcharoo
??

Cheers,
d|b

*Drew Bamford*
*Interaction Design Manager*

*TEAGUE* ________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
(Un)Subscription Options ... http://subscription-options.ixda.org/
Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixda.org/
Questions .................. lists at ixda.org
Home ....................... http://ixda.org/
Resource Library ........... http://resources.ixda.org

--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.362 / Virus Database: 267.12.8/162 - Release Date: 11/5/2005

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.362 / Virus Database: 267.12.8/165 - Release Date: 11/9/2005

10 Nov 2005 - 1:00pm
drewbam
2004

Yes, this is the trade-off that I am trying to work out. On the one hand, I
would enjoy learning some Java, building my own circuits, and supporting an
open source platform. On the other hand, I need to spend my time (=my
clients' money) wisely by focusing on the areas in which I can add the most
value. At this point, I'm thinking that I will focus on designing the
interactions and will leave the soldering and microprocessor programming to
someone else.

Thanks for the feedback.

d|b

On 11/10/05, erez <erez at tiltool.com> wrote:

In general the less support you need the less expensive the kit cost.
> Phigits are relatively expensive but have very good support and are
> designed
> for the less informed designers. It also means that things are causing
> less
> problems.
> This is an issue as with this level of prototyping problems are common and
> can place the design process into a frustrating halt.
>

14 Nov 2005 - 1:10am
Alex Tam
2004

I recently learned of a new tool appropriately
named Sketchtools. www.sketchtools.com <http://www.sketchtools.com>. I believe
story goes that it was developed by this group that
needed a tool to do rapid prototyping of physical
interfaces and have turned the tool they developed
into a product for the masses.

I particularly like the product vision...

Our vision for NADA remains the same as the day we
first discovered our own need for it: �Sketching and
prototyping interactive systems with NADA should be
like sketching with a pencil�focus on the concept, the
pencil should be a transparent extension of your mind,
eyes and hands.�

Enjoy,
~Alex Tam

---
www.alextam.com <http://www.alextam.com>

Syndicate content Get the feed