RGB, CMYK

19 Oct 2005 - 4:44pm
8 years ago
5 replies
351 reads
liyazheng
2005

Hi everyone,

I have somewhat of a technical question regarding printing. Usually when we
create detailed design images, we do it in RGB (so we can communicate that
to dev in the same language they code it in).

But when I place the images into InDesign and print them out, do I have to
somehow convert the images to make the printers happy? Because the colors
are coming out WAY off!

If anyone has any pointers around this area, please send them along.

Thank you!

Liya

Comments

20 Oct 2005 - 3:11am
Deepak Pakhare
2005

Hi Liya,
What are the images created in? One option is to convert the color
mode of your images from RGB to CMYK in say, Photoshop and save it as
a TIFF file. Place the image as a TIFF file in InDeisgn and it should
work. You need to consider the image resolution too (at least 300dpi)
if you are printing.

Hope this helps.

Cheers!
Deepak

20 Oct 2005 - 7:14am
jbellis
2005

Liya,

The answer to your quest-sorry I'm surrounded by WOW all day-as often occurs
on the web, is knowing the secret word. The word is "gamut" (or color
space). The RGB color gamut (based on combining three bright lights) simply
has different (more?) colors it can make than the CMYK gamut (based on
combining relatively darker inks). Start at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamut

Regards,
jackbellis.com, usabilityInstitute.com

20 Oct 2005 - 9:10am
mtumi
2004

in addition to the book I mentioned before, there is a tutorial on
lynda.com, prepress for photoshop, that you may find helpful. I find
that site to be an affordable way to get up to speed on new software
programs and techniques ($25 a month)

(I don't work for them, I just happen to like the service. :-) )

Michael

On Oct 20, 2005, at 4:11 AM, Deepak Pakhare wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> Hi Liya,
> What are the images created in? One option is to convert the color
> mode of your images from RGB to CMYK in say, Photoshop and save it as
> a TIFF file. Place the image as a TIFF file in InDeisgn and it should
> work. You need to consider the image resolution too (at least 300dpi)
> if you are printing.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> Cheers!
> Deepak

20 Oct 2005 - 2:55pm
Jay Zipursky
2005

Hi Liya,

I'd suggest you work with your printer. There are printing techniques
that can preserve your vibrant colors if you can afford them (for
example, using spot colors or more than 4 process colors).

Otherwise, as others have said, you simply can't preserve all colors
when converting to straight CMYK.

Jay

Kodak Graphic Communications Canada Company
Jay Zipursky | Usability Team Lead | Tel: +1.604.451.2720 ext: 2204
| jay.zipursky at creo.com

> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On
> Behalf Of liya zheng
> Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2005 2:45 PM
> To: discuss at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] RGB, CMYK
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant
> quoted material.]
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> I have somewhat of a technical question regarding printing.
> Usually when we create detailed design images, we do it in
> RGB (so we can communicate that to dev in the same language
> they code it in).
>
> But when I place the images into InDesign and print them out,
> do I have to somehow convert the images to make the printers
> happy? Because the colors are coming out WAY off!
>
> If anyone has any pointers around this area, please send them along.
>
> Thank you!
>
> Liya
> ________________________________________________________________
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>

20 Oct 2005 - 1:16pm
Elizabeth Buie
2004

It might also be an issue of monitor calibration and/or printer
profiling.

If you want a deep understanding of the issues of color management, I'd
recommend Real World Color Management, by Bruce Fraser, Fred Bunting,
and Chris Murphy:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0201773406/qid=1129832005/
sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-3452255-3558518?v=glance&s=books&n=50
7846 (if it wraps, try http://tinyurl.com/9m9oy). Or you could try the
Graphics Cafe list, at http://sparky.listmoms.net/lists/#graphics-cafe .

Elizabeth

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