Thinking Cap

27 Sep 2005 - 10:47pm
8 years ago
2 replies
604 reads
Jack L. Moffett
2005

I just read an article about some interesting work with a new input
device: a cap that reads brain activity, translating thoughts into
actions. I'm very intrigued by the possibilities and challenges such
a technology could enable as it becomes more precise. It's something
that I have joked about on occasion with my colleagues as the
"ultimate user interface." How far could this form of interaction be
taken? What tasks would it be suited for, and which would be best
left to "direct manipulation." How could they be used together?

Put on your thinking caps...

Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Interaction Designer
Inmedius
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Comments

27 Sep 2005 - 10:48pm
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Oh yes, the URL.

http://www.nature.com/news/2005/050926/full/050926-5.html

Thinking about it doesn't automatically put the link in... yet.

On Sep 27, 2005, at 11:47 PM, Jack L. Moffett wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted
> material.]
>
> I just read an article about some interesting work with a new input
> device: a cap that reads brain activity, translating thoughts into
> actions. I'm very intrigued by the possibilities and challenges
> such a technology could enable as it becomes more precise. It's
> something that I have joked about on occasion with my colleagues as
> the "ultimate user interface." How far could this form of
> interaction be taken? What tasks would it be suited for, and which
> would be best left to "direct manipulation." How could they be used
> together?
>
> Put on your thinking caps...
>
> Jack

28 Sep 2005 - 8:59am
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

Hello!

--- "Jack L. Moffett" <jmoffett at inmedius.com> wrote:

> > the "ultimate user interface." How far could this form of
> > interaction be taken? What tasks would it be suited for, and which

The article has the user base well targeted: People whose body is very
sick but whose mind is very able. For them, if they are willing to go
through all the training involved, any task would be suited. For the
rest of the human population, a single chord keyboard would be a more
efficient and useful leap forward. That too requires training, but the
benefits are even greater.

Note that chord keyboards were investigated, prototyped and promoted by
Engelbart more than thirty years ago, and that several one hand models
are now available, but that the training aspect is always the big show-
stopper.

Alain Vaillancourt

Alain D.M.G. Vaillancourt

ndgmtlcd at yahoo.com

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