UX role diagrams?

15 Jun 2005 - 1:59pm
9 years ago
5 replies
823 reads
Wendy Fischer
2004

I am wondering if anybody has or can point me in the direction of roles in user experience (usability engineer, interaction designer, visual designer, etc). I am trying to design something for a presentation, but am particularly interested in the role overlap.

-Wendy

Comments

15 Jun 2005 - 2:09pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Hi Wendy, I did a presentation that had a bunch of diagrams like this in it.
Check out ... http://synapticburn.com/comments.php?id=50_0_1_0_C
That's what I presented at the IA Summit.

Talks about roles, disciplines, and areas of a product.

-- dave

On 6/15/05 2:59 PM, "Wendy Fischer" <erpdesigner at yahoo.com> wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> I am wondering if anybody has or can point me in the direction of roles in
> user experience (usability engineer, interaction designer, visual designer,
> etc). I am trying to design something for a presentation, but am particularly
> interested in the role overlap.
>
> -Wendy
>
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
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> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/

-- dave

David Heller
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixdg.org/
Dave (at) ixdg (dot) org
Dave (at) synapticburn (dot) com
AIM: bolinhanyc || Y!: dave_ux || MSN: hippiefunk at hotmail.com

15 Jun 2005 - 2:14pm
livlab
2003

The Nine Pillars of Successful Web Teams
http://www.adaptivepath.com/publications/essays/archives/000242.php

Wendy Fischer wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> I am wondering if anybody has or can point me in the direction of roles in user experience (usability engineer, interaction designer, visual designer, etc). I am trying to design something for a presentation, but am particularly interested in the role overlap.
>
> -Wendy
>
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/

15 Jun 2005 - 6:43pm
Peter Merholz
2004

On Jun 15, 2005, at 12:14 PM, Livia Labate wrote:
>
> The Nine Pillars of Successful Web Teams
> http://www.adaptivepath.com/publications/essays/archives/000242.php

I'm a big fan of the pillars, but it shouldn't be seen as a set of
roles -- importantly, it's a set of *competencies*, competencies
where one role might involve multiple pillars, or a single pillar
might contain multiple roles.

So, for "abstract design", you could have multiple roles --
interaction designer, information architect. And for the role
information architect, you might touch on many pillars - user
research, site strategy, content strategy, and abstract design.

I part of the point of the pillars is not to get too role-oriented
(which inevitably gets job-title-oriented), but to use this more
foundational framework to think about what competencies a team needs.
And if you get these competencies with just three people, great! And
if you get them with 20, great!

--peter

15 Jun 2005 - 11:04pm
Wendy Fischer
2004

I looked at the Nine Pillars, and had already decided earlier to go with competencies before I read the article and then built the competencies into 3 roles....I simplified the number of competencies and the terminology, and also adhered more to traditional usability/software development terms. UX does not cover things like technical or content strategy.

I currently have 7 competencies and have broken that down into 3 basic yet general roles of user experience designer, user researcher, and visual designer.

As for process, I've followed a similar strategy as there's building blocks that make up a larger whole. There's a process with activities/deliverables in each phase, but for any given feature/project, the activities/deliverables change based on 1) scope of the feature, 2) timeframe, 3) Resources and 4) budget. User Experience Ala Carte! (though I have communicated that there should be a certain level of activities/deliverables we should adhere to for projects in order to achieve a minimum threshhold of acceptable usability)

Needless to say, I've looked at a lot of diagrams the past few days.

It is interesting to note that from a design standpoint many of these diagrams are really well design, have a lot of thought put into them and are interesting. However, I am really wondering what purpose they serve from an audience standpoint, particularly when the audience are not designers. Many are very complicated and hard to read. I know that some off this work is done as personal inflection; some of it is done for a UX audience; others do it because they are detailed oriented and driven to do so; some of it is done for marketing purposes; perhaps some of it is done when a designer has too much time on his hands.

-Wendy

Peter Merholz <peterme at peterme.com> wrote:
[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

On Jun 15, 2005, at 12:14 PM, Livia Labate wrote:
>
> The Nine Pillars of Successful Web Teams
> http://www.adaptivepath.com/publications/essays/archives/000242.php

I'm a big fan of the pillars, but it shouldn't be seen as a set of
roles -- importantly, it's a set of *competencies*, competencies
where one role might involve multiple pillars, or a single pillar
might contain multiple roles.

So, for "abstract design", you could have multiple roles --
interaction designer, information architect. And for the role
information architect, you might touch on many pillars - user
research, site strategy, content strategy, and abstract design.

I part of the point of the pillars is not to get too role-oriented
(which inevitably gets job-title-oriented), but to use this more
foundational framework to think about what competencies a team needs.
And if you get these competencies with just three people, great! And
if you get them with 20, great!

--peter

_______________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
(Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/

16 Jun 2005 - 4:41am
Peter Boersma
2003

Wendy Fischer said:
> Needless to say, I've looked at a lot of diagrams the past few days.
>
> It is interesting to note that from a design standpoint many of these
> diagrams are really well design, have a lot of thought put into them
> and are interesting. However, I am really wondering what purpose they
> serve from an audience standpoint, particularly when the audience are
> not designers. Many are very complicated and hard to read.

I believe the main purpose of these diagrams should be to aid fellow
designers in understandin the process. It's for them, and their colleagues
surrounding them (in a corporate setting), that the diagrams are usually
created.
In that case, a little perceived complexity isn't bad; there is time and
opportunity to study the diagram in some detail, even to be trained in
understanding it.
Now, if you want to make special editions for marketing purposes, or for
presenting to fellow professionals at conferences, you may want to spend
some time on simplifying the diagram, or beautification, or both.

In my last company we created a box-y, black and white edition initially,
for our designers benefit. It was iterated a lot, and the only reason we
tried to make it beautiful (I'd say: elegant) was to make it easier to
understand and not look as daunting as it might.
(see attachments for initial attempt and much more final version)

But then we wanted to promote our achievements to project managers, software
engineers, sales, and management in general and we created a colorful,
company-branded version. That version got printed on a large piece of paper
and put op on a wall, as well as included in sales slide decks.
(see: http://tinyurl.com/cwurb (*) for PDF file)

As usual in our field, the format and information shown depends on the
audience...

Peter
(*) original, long & wrapping URL:
http://www.peterboersma.com/publications/de2004/Design_Engaged_STUX_Deliverables_Diagram_Peter_Boersma.pdf--
Peter Boersma | Consultant User Experience
Koggestraat 10A | 1012 TA | Amsterdam | The Netherlands
phone: +31(0)206245641 | mobile: +31(0)615072747
mailto:peter at peterboersma.com | http://www.peterboersma.com

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