learning IxD in school: is a master's degreenecessary?

15 Mar 2005 - 7:59am
9 years ago
4 replies
452 reads
Henry
2004

Interaction design is all about innovation and experience,=20
I don't think any formal education will help you on this.

Henry
Bangalore, India.
www.henryjacob.com

*** Some of the world's greatest feats were accomplished by people not =
smart enough to know they were impossible. ***

----- Original Message -----=20
From: Kevin Cheng=20
To: 'Meredith Noble'=20
Cc: 'IxD'=20
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2005 5:45 PM
Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] learning IxD in school: is a master's =
degreenecessary?

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted =
material.]

My quickest response is to point you to an article I wrote on my
thoughts after my master's last year.

http://www.ok-cancel.com/?cn=3D52

Comments

15 Mar 2005 - 9:24am
Chris Whelan
2004

I don't agree.

I have a advanced degree in human factors and it's
enormously valuable. Understanding the science around
how humans perceive and process information is
critical to analyzing how/why certain design elements
trip users.

--- Henry <henry.jacob at ionidea.com> wrote:
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only
> relevant quoted material.]
>
> Interaction design is all about innovation and
> experience,
> I don't think any formal education will help you on
> this.
>
> Henry
> Bangalore, India.
> www.henryjacob.com
>
> *** Some of the world's greatest feats were
> accomplished by people not smart enough to know they
> were impossible. ***
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Kevin Cheng
> To: 'Meredith Noble'
> Cc: 'IxD'
> Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2005 5:45 PM
> Subject: RE: [ID Discuss] learning IxD in school:
> is a master's degreenecessary?
>
>
> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only
> relevant quoted material.]
>
> My quickest response is to point you to an article
> I wrote on my
> thoughts after my master's last year.
>
> http://www.ok-cancel.com/?cn=52
>
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ...
> http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List .........
> http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/
>

__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Make Yahoo! your home page
http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs

15 Mar 2005 - 10:58am
Lada Gorlenko
2004

CW> I have a advanced degree in human factors and it's
CW> enormously valuable. Understanding the science around
CW> how humans perceive and process information is
CW> critical to analyzing how/why certain design elements
CW> trip users.

I second that (having an advanced degree in Cognitive Science).
My choice of the degree program was determined by the quality and
breadth of the course, rather than by University name itself.
There wasn't a single subject (from Connectionist Psychology to C++)
that I haven't found a use for in my work as an interaction designer
and usability practitioner.

Lada

15 Mar 2005 - 11:41am
Dave Malouf
2005

I think we are approaching this incorrectly.

I think everyone can connect their pertinent education to their jobs.
HCI, Design (any type), Anthropology (or other social science), etc.

The question is what "single" degree b/c few of us can do one let alone more
than one, best prepares you to become an IxD?

To be quite honest it all depends on where you are in your career.
If you are experienced as an IxDer already, you may need to look outside
your direct experience set and supplement/augment what you know:
Design Management
HCI
Industrial Design
Anthropology (applied)

If you are inexperienced, then I suggest quite strongly in the direction
that Dan was saying, that a "design" degree is most useful and widely
underestimated in its value to this specific practice.

Studio work in particular (and the methods of studio) are immensely useful.

Lastly, it all depends on what type of person you are. Some are
self-learning, some are not. Some are good at creating relationships with
mentors, some require formal academic education.

Ok, now lastly ... What are you interested in doing? Really? MA's all of
them are professional preparing, but they are also very personal
experiences. What interests YOU.

Do your do-dilagence and be sure that the program fits your needs and that
there are good professors who you can use as formal mentors.

-- dave

On 3/15/05 10:58 AM, "Lada Gorlenko" <lada at acm.org> wrote:

> [Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]
>
> CW> I have a advanced degree in human factors and it's
> CW> enormously valuable. Understanding the science around
> CW> how humans perceive and process information is
> CW> critical to analyzing how/why certain design elements
> CW> trip users.
>
> I second that (having an advanced degree in Cognitive Science).
> My choice of the degree program was determined by the quality and
> breadth of the course, rather than by University name itself.
> There wasn't a single subject (from Connectionist Psychology to C++)
> that I haven't found a use for in my work as an interaction designer
> and usability practitioner.
>
> Lada
>
> _______________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Group!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixdg.org
> (Un)Subscription Options ... http://discuss.ixdg.org/
> Announcements List ......... http://subscribe-announce.ixdg.org/
> Questions .................. lists at ixdg.org
> Home ....................... http://ixdg.org/

-- dave

David Heller
http://synapticburn.com/
http://ixdg.org
dave at ixdg.org
dave at synapticburn.com
AIM: bolinhanyc || Y!: dave_ux || MSN: hippiefunk at hotmail.com

16 Mar 2005 - 5:25pm
Anirudha Joshi
2003

Design, Information Science, Computer Science, Psychology... which of
these four traditional disciplines are most suitable for the profession
of interaction design? The answers to this rather blunt and leading
question typically sound like a story that I heard as a kid - the story
of 'six blind men and an elephant'*.

I have written up a couple of papers on who an interaction designer is,
and what should be the education of interaction designers. Perhaps you
are interested to give me some feedback:

> Anirudha Joshi, Education of Interaction Design - an Interdisciplinary
Approach, Design Education - Tradition and Modernity, Ahmedabad, 2005
http://www.idc.iitb.ac.in/~anirudha/pdfs/JoshiADETM2005.pdf

> Anirudha Joshi, Interaction Design in India - Past, Present and
Future, CHI 2004, Vienna, 2004
http://www.idc.iitb.ac.in/~anirudha/papers/dev05-Joshi.pdf

Apologies for the self-promotion and possible repetition.
Anirudha

* Roughly:
Once upon a time there were six blind men who stumbled upon an elephant.
The one who touched the trunk of the elephant said the elephant is like
a python. The one who got to touch his ears said that is like a 'soop'
(soop: Marathi, a device used to separate stones in grain, and shaped
like the elephant's ear). The one who touched the elephant's leg said it
is like the trunk of a tree. The one who touched his tail said the snake
is like a rope. And so on...

Then the blind men started arguing about their point of view. They kept
arguing for a long time, but none could convince the other of his point
of view. Then they went to a sighted person and asked him to resolve the
issue. The sighted person said they were all wrong, and the elephant...
you get the point.

Syndicate content Get the feed