RIA reason (tad off-topic but connected to previous threads)

1 Feb 2005 - 3:48pm
9 years ago
2 replies
971 reads
Dave Malouf
2005

http://sys-con.com/story/?storyid=47364

The above link is a pretty techie reason why RIAs are invaluable for a
certain level of application development. It talks about the messaging layer
in HTTP/HTML solutions that no matter how robust DHTML/XHTML becomes it will
sit upon.

I'd be interested in hearing other people's thoughts about this.

I think since we had a long discussion about RIAs in the past that it is
something that interests a good number of people here.

-- dave

Comments

1 Feb 2005 - 4:31pm
subimage interactive
2004

On Tue, 01 Feb 2005 15:48:26 -0500, David Heller <dave at ixdg.org> wrote:
>
> The above link is a pretty techie reason why RIAs are invaluable for a
> certain level of application development. It talks about the messaging layer
> in HTTP/HTML solutions that no matter how robust DHTML/XHTML becomes it will
> sit upon.
>
> I'd be interested in hearing other people's thoughts about this.

This is a definite problem, but easier to get around these days with
intelligent polling and things like XMLHTTPResponse. It's funny though
that these issues are now getting coverage. I worked for a company
called Kenamea (http://www.kenamea.com/) about three years ago that
was offering a server for just this purpose (reliable communications,
p2p, server push, etc).

It never fully took off and they transformed into an application
development company, partly due to developer ignorance IMHO. Perhaps
now something like this is poised to make a strong entry into the
market since people are more aware of the intricacies of RIA
development.

--
seth @ subimage interactive
http://www.subimage.com/

1 Feb 2005 - 4:58pm
Clay Newton
2004

Well, the author (Coach K Wei) of the article is the founder of
Nexaweb, a rich client platform, so he has a bit of a bias. Wei's
article mentions the importance of "push", but in reality, there are
not very many rich client technologies that have effectively
implemented "push". The promise of push is one the first factors that
draw technologists to RIAs. In fact, many rich client platform vendors
tout push in the marketing literature, but the system that must be put
in place in order to implement true push usually involves some
relatively significant client IT allowances.

Additionally, many rich clients do not get around using HTTP for
communication. Some are capable of doing so, but HTTP is usually the
default. As such, all of the issues with messaging are still present,
there is just the potential for more elegant ways of dealing with the
issues as they arise in RIAs than in HTML-based apps.

One of the first issue companies have to deal with in moving towards
RIAs is understanding the implications and limitations of the
requisite application container. All application containers have their
own client requirements (.exe download, OS requirements, Java version
requirements).

With HTML-based apps, the issues and limitations imposed by the
browser are familiar and well documented by numerous sources including
developers, developer consortiums, and the browser technical docs.
Each of the various rich client platforms has its own expanding set of
docs floating about on the web. That said, the browser issues have
more or less become second nature for companies build HTML-based web
apps, it is going to take a number of years for the same to happen
with a new technology.

The fact is, as Rumsfeld might assert if he was a geek, there are
known unknowns and unknown unknowns: RIAs create more unknown unknowns
than HTML-based web apps. Of course, that is one of the things that
makes them so exciting...

-Clay

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