Facebook Redesign.

9 Feb 2010 - 10:45pm
4 years ago
2 replies
453 reads
Richard Carson
2010

The "3 column fixed header and footer" is similar to Yahoo's homepage, which has deteriorated since. Compare this to the New York Times, Yahoo gives off a certain sense of cheap filled content with McDonalds and MTV. (blech!)

The new Facebook redesign is too busy with the new open hierarchy structure. Taking out the Application bar was a big lost. They could have offered transparency to free up visual space. Though it seems that the intent is to get more page views and serve more ads in the new way.

In doing so, they've taken away all the great features I've come to love. I actually feel very overwhelmed because everything is thrown at you. More links. unnecessary and useless content for users. However, people have said that about Facebook in comparison to places like Twitter.

Here are some of my pet peeves.

- The reiterated forced chat list in both left and hidden right column is unnecessary.
- I have 5 applications listed on my left (I don't know why those 5) but because of the lack of customization. I can't change it.
- Deleting apps is unforgiving. (I accidentally deleted an app and I can't get it back)
- Applications takes me to more applications. Or click on "more" to see more applications of a different type set? (that's confusing)
- The lack of customization is very, very disappointing. (But look where customization has taken mySpace)
- Creating lists is now gone!!! (I spent lots of time creating and organizing lists for my newsfeed and they're now gone)
- The line separations that issolate the news in newsfeed is too strong. It hurts my eyeballs.
- It's a very time consuming process to switch between applications. (I have to go back home, see more apps, then find/select the new application)

i can go on an on, but the basic message is that taking out the application menu was a big loss..... I don't know if I am in the smaller or larger majority audience on this one, but R.I.P. to the Application menu. I hope you see you back in the future.

R.C.

On Feb 9, 2010, at 7:01 AM, Vlad Margulis wrote:

> The new Facebook design looks like one of the busiest interfaces I've
> seen in a while. It immediately reminded me of the Yahoo! homepage
> back when... well, when it was too busy. Yet somehow, the Facebook
> homepage makes sense, doesn't feel too overwhelming and is easily
> navigable and parse-able.
>
> I think there are two things going on here; one is that they did a
> fairly good job following basic Gestalt principles of perception to
> clearly chunk out the layout and establish hierarchy. Two, I think
> our brains are becoming more accustomed to processing much more
> visual information.
>
> It's been suggested by new neurological research that the way the
> brain understands complex concepts is through established
> neurological frameworks, meaning the brain forms neural circuits
> which define a specific conceptual framework. For example if I say
> "Mystery novel" your brain already has an established
> idea/preconception of the structure of that concept. When you read
> the actual novel, you'll be fitting the content into that framework,
> through a process called neural binding.
>
> My theory is that we now have a neurological framework of such
> interfaces -- we know the navigation will be on the left, we know the
> content will be in the middle, we know there might be threading of
> conversations, we know there might be a chat roster on the lower
> left, we know a chat window might popup on the lower right, we know
> there will be a searchbox at the top, etc. In fact, if you look at
> the Yahoo! design, the page that it initially reminded me of, it has
> a very similar structure. Because we already have this framework in
> our brain, we don't need too much of a cognitive process to
> understand the page, all we need to do is process the content. I
> believe even though the page looks crazy busy to our design-trained
> eye, we now have the proper neural structure to be able to parse and
> comprehend it with relative ease.
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49195
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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Comments

9 Feb 2010 - 11:57pm
SteveJBayer
2008

Facebook seems to be trying too hard to be more of an app or an
information/sales portal than an online social space.

The left sidebar on the new homepage seems to emphasize navigating
site features over socializing by placing the the block with
applications, games, ads..etc. above the block with the display of
current online friends.

Improved navigation (or rather having a strong emphasis on exploring
site features) ends up making the site seem more of an online catalog
to find information to read or products to purchase than for site
members to re-connect and socialize.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49195

10 Feb 2010 - 1:36am
rajeshsundaram
2007

I too miss the Application menu. It was easier earlier. Also I notice the
"Games > Your Games" doesnt list all the games that I have subscribed to.

- Rajesh
Zoho Corp

On Wed, Feb 10, 2010 at 9:15 AM, Richard Carson
<richard.carson75 at gmail.com>wrote:

> The "3 column fixed header and footer" is similar to Yahoo's homepage,
> which has deteriorated since. Compare this to the New York Times, Yahoo
> gives off a certain sense of cheap filled content with McDonalds and MTV.
> (blech!)
>
> The new Facebook redesign is too busy with the new open hierarchy
> structure. Taking out the Application bar was a big lost. They could have
> offered transparency to free up visual space. Though it seems that the
> intent is to get more page views and serve more ads in the new way.
>
> In doing so, they've taken away all the great features I've come to love. I
> actually feel very overwhelmed because everything is thrown at you. More
> links. unnecessary and useless content for users. However, people have said
> that about Facebook in comparison to places like Twitter.
>
> Here are some of my pet peeves.
>
> - The reiterated forced chat list in both left and hidden right column is
> unnecessary.
> - I have 5 applications listed on my left (I don't know why those 5) but
> because of the lack of customization. I can't change it.
> - Deleting apps is unforgiving. (I accidentally deleted an app and I can't
> get it back)
> - Applications takes me to more applications. Or click on "more" to see
> more applications of a different type set? (that's confusing)
> - The lack of customization is very, very disappointing. (But look where
> customization has taken mySpace)
> - Creating lists is now gone!!! (I spent lots of time creating and
> organizing lists for my newsfeed and they're now gone)
> - The line separations that issolate the news in newsfeed is too strong.
> It hurts my eyeballs.
> - It's a very time consuming process to switch between applications. (I
> have to go back home, see more apps, then find/select the new application)
>
> i can go on an on, but the basic message is that taking out the application
> menu was a big loss..... I don't know if I am in the smaller or larger
> majority audience on this one, but R.I.P. to the Application menu. I hope
> you see you back in the future.
>
> R.C.
>
>
>
>
> On Feb 9, 2010, at 7:01 AM, Vlad Margulis wrote:
>
> > The new Facebook design looks like one of the busiest interfaces I've
> > seen in a while. It immediately reminded me of the Yahoo! homepage
> > back when... well, when it was too busy. Yet somehow, the Facebook
> > homepage makes sense, doesn't feel too overwhelming and is easily
> > navigable and parse-able.
> >
> > I think there are two things going on here; one is that they did a
> > fairly good job following basic Gestalt principles of perception to
> > clearly chunk out the layout and establish hierarchy. Two, I think
> > our brains are becoming more accustomed to processing much more
> > visual information.
> >
> > It's been suggested by new neurological research that the way the
> > brain understands complex concepts is through established
> > neurological frameworks, meaning the brain forms neural circuits
> > which define a specific conceptual framework. For example if I say
> > "Mystery novel" your brain already has an established
> > idea/preconception of the structure of that concept. When you read
> > the actual novel, you'll be fitting the content into that framework,
> > through a process called neural binding.
> >
> > My theory is that we now have a neurological framework of such
> > interfaces -- we know the navigation will be on the left, we know the
> > content will be in the middle, we know there might be threading of
> > conversations, we know there might be a chat roster on the lower
> > left, we know a chat window might popup on the lower right, we know
> > there will be a searchbox at the top, etc. In fact, if you look at
> > the Yahoo! design, the page that it initially reminded me of, it has
> > a very similar structure. Because we already have this framework in
> > our brain, we don't need too much of a cognitive process to
> > understand the page, all we need to do is process the content. I
> > believe even though the page looks crazy busy to our design-trained
> > eye, we now have the proper neural structure to be able to parse and
> > comprehend it with relative ease.
> >
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Reply to this thread at ixda.org
> > http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=49195
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

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