Sketching before the Wireframes

1 Feb 2010 - 10:03pm
4 years ago
55 replies
20643 reads
Richard Carson
2010

Hi Folks,

I wanted to ask around on the process of creating wireframes for designing mobile applications. In creating these wireframes, should I work on paper before actually hopping into a drawing program to lay out these wireframes? I believe working on paper is faster and easier before laying out the wireframes for a project. However, the company I am working with, might be wondering if I am wasting my time. That I should be doing wireframes within the drawing program. What are your suggestions and thoughts on this issue?

Comments

2 Feb 2010 - 2:46am
Queen Catherine
2009

I'm with you buddy - I much prefer to sketch out my ideas using good
ol' fashioned pen (or a Sharpie) and paper.
I don't feel it makes a vast difference what you use to produce
wireframes - as long as you can communicate the interaction.

I also feel that the "sketch" approach keeps people focused on the
interaction, rather than confusing stylised wireframes for design.

That being said - corporate folk often like a digital version (which
also makes sharing a lot easier).

I highly recommend Balsamiq Mockups
http://www.balsamiq.com/products/mockups
- it's a great little Air app that keeps the sketchy feel and is
really easy to use. I have to say - it's almost as good as
sketching.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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2 Feb 2010 - 2:58am
Mike Hales
2009

Hi

I would absolutely go with the sketches, much faster and easier to
knock out, experiment with etc. You'll save time later when moving
onto software and/or paper prototypes etc.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2 Feb 2010 - 3:09am
rajeshsundaram
2007

I usually start with a big whiteboard and marker to sketch the flow and
wireframes. Whiteboard is relatively easier to erase and alter the
wireframes, compared to paper & eraser combo. Afterwards, I capture them in
paper (pencil sketch) or take a photo with my mobile phone to archive them.

- Rajesh
(Zoho Corp)

On Tue, Feb 2, 2010 at 5:28 AM, Mike Hales <mike.hales at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi
>
> I would absolutely go with the sketches, much faster and easier to
> knock out, experiment with etc. You'll save time later when moving
> onto software and/or paper prototypes etc.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924
>
>
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2 Feb 2010 - 3:27am
Graham Sear
2010

Hi,

I guess it's whatever works best for you, although there is
absolutely nothing wrong with paper prototyping first. This is pretty
much how all designers start getting their ideas together, as it's
very fast and cheap to do.

There is a bit of guidance on wikipedia that may help.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_prototyping - although I think
that cutting bits out is probably going a bit too far, and an
interactive wireframe would work much better.

You can also do 'scamps' which are a slightly more designery
wireframe.
http://community.brandrepublic.com/forums/t/11751.aspx

Cheers

Graham

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2 Feb 2010 - 3:31am
Sachin Ghodke
2008

Sketches - yes, the beginning of your product development process. I
use paper and pencil to sketch and work out the flow and design of
the product. This helps me and my development team immensely to
achieve what is expected from them and what the final product is to
be like. After sketches, I do use InDesign for a basic flow to
portray it with a must cleaner look. This again puts things in a
better perspective and the issues that were raised while doing the
sketches are then eliminated. It is seldom that I would use wire
framing softwares like Axure. Softwares like Axure can be used for
complex products. Due to the rapid development process, I rarely use
paper prototypes.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2 Feb 2010 - 3:40am
Himanshu Agrawal
2009

well..m just a student....working in a company for a sponsored project for
my thesis....
application development for iPhones, etc.
even i use to prefer to make wireframes on paper....
good deal of sketching and bit of text is more then enough to convey my
ideas....
while sketching i feel more liberty to express myself...
i also tried on omnigraffle but found it more time consuming and
monotonous...
thats my perception...

ADB
himanshu

On Tue, Feb 2, 2010 at 8:33 AM, Richard Carson
<richard.carson75 at gmail.com>wrote:

> Hi Folks,
>
> I wanted to ask around on the process of creating wireframes for designing
> mobile applications. In creating these wireframes, should I work on paper
> before actually hopping into a drawing program to lay out these wireframes?
> I believe working on paper is faster and easier before laying out the
> wireframes for a project. However, the company I am working with, might be
> wondering if I am wasting my time. That I should be doing wireframes within
> the drawing program. What are your suggestions and thoughts on this issue?
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Himanshu Agrawal
B.Arch, M.Des(IIT-Kanpur)
+91 9005 850 301

2 Feb 2010 - 9:43am
jasonrobb
2009

Definitely sketch first. Always paper before pixels. Then if you can,
share those sketches with someone in your team and get their
feedback. Then move to digital.

Even if you don't share them with anyone, use them as a cheat sheet
for your digital mockups. If anyone asks, tell them it's an
interface outline. You need to know exactly what data you're working
with BEFORE you start pushing pixels, else you'll waste far more
time.

I wrote an article about sketching that might be of some help:
http://www.uxbooth.com/blog/tools-for-sketching-user-experiences/

Cheers,

Jason R.
http://jasonrobb.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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2 Feb 2010 - 10:05am
Jason Richardson
2007

Putting ideas on paper might seem like a waste to a stakeholder. But
the one point to get across is that you're less likely to self edit
and clean up your ideas while sketching. Pen and paper allows you
the ability to throw out ideas quickly and not necessarily worry
about the final deliverable to the stakeholder. I prefer to sketch
ideas out and put into Omni, Visio or straight to HTML prototype
depending on the project. But I have noticed that working in the
software as a first step, I'm definitely not as open to ideas and
thinking of the issue from another angle.

Also, check out these two resources.
Thoughts from Will Evans on sketching -
http://blog.semanticfoundry.com/2010/01/31/shades-of-gray-thoughts-on-sketching/

Great book by Todd Zaki Warfel on prototyping -
http://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/prototyping/

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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2 Feb 2010 - 10:21am
Sean Gerety
2009

I always use paper and pencil (or whiteboard) to do multiple designs of a
concept. Then we vet the designs and then move to a wireframe tool. Plus,
it is much faster and more collaborative I find than using a wireframing
tool.

Happy Sketching,

Sean

On Mon, Feb 1, 2010 at 10:03 PM, Richard Carson
<richard.carson75 at gmail.com>wrote:

> Hi Folks,
>
> I wanted to ask around on the process of creating wireframes for designing
> mobile applications. In creating these wireframes, should I work on paper
> before actually hopping into a drawing program to lay out these wireframes?
> I believe working on paper is faster and easier before laying out the
> wireframes for a project. However, the company I am working with, might be
> wondering if I am wasting my time. That I should be doing wireframes within
> the drawing program. What are your suggestions and thoughts on this issue?
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

2 Feb 2010 - 11:07am
SemanticWill
2007

Hi Richard,

I always start with sketching - couple of days ago I wrote a blog
post about my sketching before wireframing process here:
Shades of Gray: Thoughts on Sketching
http://tinyurl.com/ylpp4t8

Or
The Right Way to Wireframe video I made for the IxD10 conference
workshop.
http://tinyurl.com/yzm96ru

Cheers,

~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Feb 2, 2010, at 10:21 AM, Sean Gerety wrote:

> I always use paper and pencil (or whiteboard) to do multiple designs
> of a
> concept. Then we vet the designs and then move to a wireframe tool.
> Plus,
> it is much faster and more collaborative I find than using a
> wireframing
> tool.
>
> Happy Sketching,
>
> Sean
>
> On Mon, Feb 1, 2010 at 10:03 PM, Richard Carson
> <richard.carson75 at gmail.com>wrote:
>
>> Hi Folks,
>>
>> I wanted to ask around on the process of creating wireframes for
>> designing
>> mobile applications. In creating these wireframes, should I work on
>> paper
>> before actually hopping into a drawing program to lay out these
>> wireframes?
>> I believe working on paper is faster and easier before laying out the
>> wireframes for a project. However, the company I am working with,
>> might be
>> wondering if I am wasting my time. That I should be doing
>> wireframes within
>> the drawing program. What are your suggestions and thoughts on this
>> issue?
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

2 Feb 2010 - 11:16am
Ariel Leroux
2009

For me its often a matter of the requirements.

Sometimes I'll be given a set of requirements and as I'm reading,
the layout just comes to mind. In these cases, sketching is entirely
unecessary as I already have a thorough idea of where everything
should be in my head.

However, if clarity isn't quite there, getting objects down on paper
or on a whiteboard often helps the process along of brainstorming.

I find the sketching process to be particularly beneficial for
workflow and getting past conflicts in what I have already perceived
in the design. Things become more clear when they're on paper.

Good luck!

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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2 Feb 2010 - 12:49pm
Dave Malouf
2005

Richard, I think the question is framed incorrectly. "Sketching" is
not about the tools you use, but about the intention you have with
those tools. Some may disagree but I have fallen directly on the
doctrine that Bill Buxton proposed in his Sketching User Experience
book. I also reframed it slightly to suggest that sketching
regardless of the tool used has these properties:

1) disposable - not in the sense that it can be thrown out but that
it WILL be thrown out.

2) volume (multiplicity) - You need a critical mass of quantity of
sketches around the domains you are working on.

3) Roughness - the more refined it is the more it will illicit
unintended responses from those that you are share it with

I'm going blank at the moment, but if you just use those 3 and you
stick w/ the intentionality of question (instead of statement) then
you are sketching.

Now all of that together usually leads people to paper and pen(cil).
But as I said the tool is not the point.

If you are drawing or even white boarding and you do 1 or 2 and then
done, you are not sketching in the design process sense, but only in
the type of drawing style sense.

But that's my take on this.

-- dave

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2 Feb 2010 - 1:19pm
jrrogan
2005

I usually start on White boards/paper. It's fast and flexible, and
definitely high value used in the correct circumstances.

Also I don't think paper prototyping is any more or less disposable then a
digital Wireframe version. I'm looking directly at a paper prototype now, on
the wall infront of me, which has outlived almost every digital wireframe in
the product I'm working on.

Rich

On Mon, Feb 1, 2010 at 10:03 PM, Richard Carson
<richard.carson75 at gmail.com>wrote:

> Hi Folks,
>
> I wanted to ask around on the process of creating wireframes for designing
> mobile applications. In creating these wireframes, should I work on paper
> before actually hopping into a drawing program to lay out these wireframes?
> I believe working on paper is faster and easier before laying out the
> wireframes for a project. However, the company I am working with, might be
> wondering if I am wasting my time. That I should be doing wireframes within
> the drawing program. What are your suggestions and thoughts on this issue?
>
>
>
> --
> Joseph Rich Rogan
> President UX/UI Inc.
> http://www.jrrogan.com
>

2 Feb 2010 - 1:44pm
Eugene Kim
2005

Hi Richard,

Sketches (whether on paper, whiteboard, etc.) are definitely NOT a
waste of time and I'm surprised anyone would complain about that.
The only thing I can imagine is that you're creating fairly
high-fidelity wires on paper which might be a problem from a time
management perspective?

Personally, I've found that a lot of my workflow is really dependent
on the team I'm working with. You can be in one group where ideas
are collaborative and go straight to implementation, whereas another
group expects nothing else but for you to toss deliverables over the
wall. Both instances will require you to work through your ideas but
the latter is sort of hidden from the outside world where people might
not understand your process (you handing over deliverables in x format
is basically "the process" to them).

Have an example of your sketches you us to take a look at?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2 Feb 2010 - 8:26am
tonyzeoli
2008

Five Steps to Take for Idiots Like That:

1. Take the paper notepad out of their hands when they're taking notes in
the meeting. Look sternly at them and tell them they are simply wasting the
company's time by not taking their notes on a computer in the proper word
processing program.
2. Hit them over the head with the computer (j/k).
3. Once they realize their own foolish desire to be micro-managers, drive
them to a whiteboard and sketch out everything. Through this iterative
process, maybe they'll see how stupid it is for you to wire frame in a
computer program, so that they can PRINT IT OUT and MAKE NOTES ON IT,
instead of getting right the first time. (ARGH!)
4. Then take iPhone snapshots of your whiteboard masterpiece (so you
remember it, just in case some idiot comes in after lunch and erases it) and
open your favorite wire framing program and finish the job.
5. If they ask you to send them the file in MS PowerPoint, either quit and
find a new company to work for, or say, that's not in my job description.
Hand them a thumb drive with the OmniGraffle or InDesign file and say,
"sorry...you're on your own." Then stand back to see how much time they
waste trying to find someone else that can open the file for them. Who's
wasting time now?

On Mon, Feb 1, 2010 at 2:03 PM, Richard Carson
<richard.carson75 at gmail.com>wrote:

> Hi Folks,
>
> I wanted to ask around on the process of creating wireframes for designing
> mobile applications. In creating these wireframes, should I work on paper
> before actually hopping into a drawing program to lay out these wireframes?
> I believe working on paper is faster and easier before laying out the
> wireframes for a project. However, the company I am working with, might be
> wondering if I am wasting my time. That I should be doing wireframes within
> the drawing program. What are your suggestions and thoughts on this issue?
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

2 Feb 2010 - 1:37pm
Kenneth Vella
2009

I would go paper first, so much easier to manipulate in the beginning
of the project.

-------------------------------------------------
Thank you,
Ken Vella
ken at kenvella.com
kenvella.com

On Feb 1, 2010, at 7:03 PM, Richard Carson wrote:

> Hi Folks,
>
> I wanted to ask around on the process of creating wireframes for
> designing mobile applications. In creating these wireframes, should
> I work on paper before actually hopping into a drawing program to
> lay out these wireframes? I believe working on paper is faster and
> easier before laying out the wireframes for a project. However, the
> company I am working with, might be wondering if I am wasting my
> time. That I should be doing wireframes within the drawing program.
> What are your suggestions and thoughts on this issue?
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

2 Feb 2010 - 7:45pm
Melissa Casburn
2008

To follow on Dave Malouf's point:

As someone who's working with many different clients who in turn
have many different perspectives on what's a "valuable" use of my
time, I feel your pain. We're always looking for ways to preserve
the integrity of our process while showing our clients concepts that
they can get their heads around.

We ask our clients upfront about their openness to reviewing and
commenting on hand-drawn sketches; some are thrilled, some are
nervous, some are just not buying it. And it's not always worth it
to "convert" a client to wholehearted adoption of hand-drawn
sketches if it makes them uncomfortable. So in those cases, we
quickly transfer our sketches into low-fidelity thumbnails (6 or 8 to
a page) in a Visio doc, which we describe as 'concept sketches'
instead of 'wireframes'.

So we still sketch by hand, the client still gets something that
looks slightly more finished but is ultimately still disposable. And
everybody's happy.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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3 Feb 2010 - 1:02am
Richard Carson
2010

Thanks everyone,

For all the wonderful responses and support for sketching. It looks like EVERYONE, gave power to the sketching, before the wireframes process. Surprisingly not one person ever mention that sketching was a waste of time. Really...Not one?

However, the same cannot be said for the company I just started working with, who cannot get on onboard with the paper or even a whiteboard process.The response I get is... "sketching is for your own personal purposes. We just need to see the wireframes." So they'll put their input into the designing the UI, but never fully understanding how the application actually works.

Richard

3 Feb 2010 - 3:02am
David Holmes
2009

Sketching is still a great way of thrashing out your ideas in rough
before you cementing them via computer, yes its old school bread and
butter stuff but its very productive, especially seeing as you are
designing a software app for a mobile device. This is a quick and
dirty way to work but one that puts it in to its true context of use,
create a foam or card model of the device and the intended screen
size/ sizes and away you go sketch your heart away and run through
the screen instances with your model device in your hand and you will
get a true sense of what this thing is you are trying to create. You
will save yourself alot of time and effort sketching your ideas out
like this first plus its fun.

Hope this helps

Cheers

Dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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3 Feb 2010 - 3:40am
Anand Shashidhar
2009

Guess there is no 'One Good Way' going about this. The simplicity in
using paper and pen or a white board for chalking out initial details
probably help by freeing up more of your concentration on the
ideation itself.
While the computer offers several extra add-ons to make the process
faster, the learning curve is one bottle-neck to overcome, before
seamlessly ingesting it into a brain storming session.
My previous company team had 'Simple Rules' on our thinking cap,
with lots of print-boards, and that really did help out... so much
that its a proven process that I am so comfortable with. There are
times when much more information would be required, and may include
some bit of radical processing, like arranging thoughts based on
labels and that sort. Maybe one of these tools will efficiently jump
in here.
Wireframes require some bit of correction, and as more widgets,
controls and options jump in, ample room of changes should be
available right from the word go.
While using paper, ensure you have lots of free space all around, and
fitting in the no-so-obvious additions shoudl take off with ease.
Sometimes, you can also use a lot of stickies, for options and such,
so that re-arranging them is not a pain in the...!
Using a white board does seem to have the simple option of erasing
and re-writing stuff, but watch out for signs of laziness that may
just about let you accept a fault because you are too bored to erase
and write a lot of stuff again :)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2 Feb 2010 - 3:42pm
Josh Ehlke
2008

Paper first. I like to avoid whiteboards for mobile (unless I can't because
I'm working in a group). When you draw a mobile interface on a whiteboard,
you get no sense for how big or small or crammed anything will be on the
final screen size. You almost always end up putting too much on a screen, or
thinking fonts will be smaller than they are, etc. If anything get small
notepads and go from there.

~Josh

3 Feb 2010 - 8:29am
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Feb 3, 2010, at 1:02 AM, Richard Carson wrote:

> Thanks everyone, for all the wonderful responses and support for
> sketching. It looks like EVERYONE, gave power to the sketching,
> before the wireframes process. Surprisingly not one person ever
> mention that sketching was a waste of time. Really...Not one?

I'll bite.

Sketching is a complete waste of time.

Obviously, the ideas were already in your head. Why make the extra
effort to put them on paper. They never come out the way you intended
anyhow.

In fact, wireframes are a waste of time too.

You should just sit down and code.

Code, code, code. That's the way we get things done around here.

And don't worry about crafting bug free code. That takes time and
never pays off. Any code will do.

Remember our motto: Once you remove quality as a requirement,
everything else becomes a whole lot easier.

Jared

3 Feb 2010 - 8:40am
SemanticWill
2007

Jared is right -

but I prefer the tagline for the Cult of Agile and their SCRUM acolytes:

"Code it fast, Code it Wrong, Code it Again."

~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | Director, Experience Design
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
http://www.linkedin.com/in/semanticwill
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Feb 3, 2010, at 8:29 AM, Jared Spool wrote:

>
> On Feb 3, 2010, at 1:02 AM, Richard Carson wrote:
>
>> Thanks everyone, for all the wonderful responses and support for
>> sketching. It looks like EVERYONE, gave power to the sketching,
>> before the wireframes process. Surprisingly not one person ever
>> mention that sketching was a waste of time. Really...Not one?
>
> I'll bite.
>
> Sketching is a complete waste of time.
>
> Obviously, the ideas were already in your head. Why make the extra
> effort to put them on paper. They never come out the way you
> intended anyhow.
>
> In fact, wireframes are a waste of time too.
>
> You should just sit down and code.
>
> Code, code, code. That's the way we get things done around here.
>
> And don't worry about crafting bug free code. That takes time and
> never pays off. Any code will do.
>
> Remember our motto: Once you remove quality as a requirement,
> everything else becomes a whole lot easier.
>
> Jared
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

3 Feb 2010 - 9:36am
Anjali Arora, NYU
2004

I agree with Jared about cutting straight to the chase, & focusing on just building things. However, it is rarely an either-or situation, but rather one of degree; while trying to build something, I find it useful to make quick paper doodles/sketches of the various states, for example. Helps to clear one's mind before starting to code.
-Anjali

----- Original Message -----
From: Jared Spool <jspool at uie.com>
Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 8:29 am
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Sketching before the Wireframes
To: Richard Carson <richard.carson75 at gmail.com>
Cc: IXDA list <discuss at ixda.org>

> On Feb 3, 2010, at 1:02 AM, Richard Carson wrote:
>
> > Thanks everyone, for all the wonderful responses and support for
> > sketching. It looks like EVERYONE, gave power to the sketching,
> > before the wireframes process. Surprisingly not one person ever
> > mention that sketching was a waste of time. Really...Not one?
>
> I'll bite.
>
> Sketching is a complete waste of time.
>
> Obviously, the ideas were already in your head. Why make the extra
> effort to put them on paper. They never come out the way you intended
>
> anyhow.
>
> In fact, wireframes are a waste of time too.
>
> You should just sit down and code.
>
> Code, code, code. That's the way we get things done around here.
>
> And don't worry about crafting bug free code. That takes time and
> never pays off. Any code will do.
>
> Remember our motto: Once you remove quality as a requirement,
> everything else becomes a whole lot easier.
>
> Jared
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

3 Feb 2010 - 9:39am
SemanticWill
2007

He was being snarky :-)

~ will

On Feb 3, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Anjali Arora wrote:

> I agree with Jared about cutting straight to the chase, & focusing
> on just building things. However, it is rarely an either-or
> situation, but rather one of degree; while trying to build
> something, I find it useful to make quick paper doodles/sketches of
> the various states, for example. Helps to clear one's mind before
> starting to code.
> -Anjali
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Jared Spool <jspool at uie.com>
> Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 8:29 am
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Sketching before the Wireframes
> To: Richard Carson <richard.carson75 at gmail.com>
> Cc: IXDA list <discuss at ixda.org>
>
>> On Feb 3, 2010, at 1:02 AM, Richard Carson wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks everyone, for all the wonderful responses and support for
>>> sketching. It looks like EVERYONE, gave power to the sketching,
>>> before the wireframes process. Surprisingly not one person ever
>>> mention that sketching was a waste of time. Really...Not one?
>>
>> I'll bite.
>>
>> Sketching is a complete waste of time.
>>
>> Obviously, the ideas were already in your head. Why make the extra
>> effort to put them on paper. They never come out the way you intended
>>
>> anyhow.
>>
>> In fact, wireframes are a waste of time too.
>>
>> You should just sit down and code.
>>
>> Code, code, code. That's the way we get things done around here.
>>
>> And don't worry about crafting bug free code. That takes time and
>> never pays off. Any code will do.
>>
>> Remember our motto: Once you remove quality as a requirement,
>> everything else becomes a whole lot easier.
>>
>> Jared
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

3 Feb 2010 - 9:48am
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Feb 3, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Anjali Arora wrote:

> I agree with Jared about cutting straight to the chase, & focusing
> on just building things.

Please, for the sake of the Gods, never, ever take anything I say
seriously. It will only get you into deep, deep trouble.

Jared

3 Feb 2010 - 9:59am
Anjali Arora, NYU
2004

I wasn't. You are taking yourself too seriously Jared :)

----- Original Message -----
From: Jared Spool <jspool at uie.com>
Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 9:48 am
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Sketching before the Wireframes
To: Anjali Arora <aa917 at nyu.edu>
Cc: IXDA list <discuss at ixda.org>

> On Feb 3, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Anjali Arora wrote:
>
> > I agree with Jared about cutting straight to the chase, & focusing
>
> > on just building things.
>
> Please, for the sake of the Gods, never, ever take anything I say
> seriously. It will only get you into deep, deep trouble.
>
> Jared

3 Feb 2010 - 10:00am
Anjali Arora, NYU
2004

I know :)

----- Original Message -----
From: Will Evans <will at semanticfoundry.com>
Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 9:42 am
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Sketching before the Wireframes
To: Anjali Arora <aa917 at nyu.edu>
Cc: Jared Spool <jspool at uie.com>, IXDA list <discuss at ixda.org>

> He was being snarky :-)
>
>
> ~ will
>
>
> On Feb 3, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Anjali Arora wrote:
>
> > I agree with Jared about cutting straight to the chase, & focusing
>
> > on just building things. However, it is rarely an either-or
> > situation, but rather one of degree; while trying to build
> > something, I find it useful to make quick paper doodles/sketches of
>
> > the various states, for example. Helps to clear one's mind before
> > starting to code.
> > -Anjali
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: Jared Spool <jspool at uie.com>
> > Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 8:29 am
> > Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Sketching before the Wireframes
> > To: Richard Carson <richard.carson75 at gmail.com>
> > Cc: IXDA list <discuss at ixda.org>
> >
> >> On Feb 3, 2010, at 1:02 AM, Richard Carson wrote:
> >>
> >>> Thanks everyone, for all the wonderful responses and support for
> >>> sketching. It looks like EVERYONE, gave power to the sketching,
> >>> before the wireframes process. Surprisingly not one person ever
> >>> mention that sketching was a waste of time. Really...Not one?
> >>
> >> I'll bite.
> >>
> >> Sketching is a complete waste of time.
> >>
> >> Obviously, the ideas were already in your head. Why make the extra
> >> effort to put them on paper. They never come out the way you intended
> >>
> >> anyhow.
> >>
> >> In fact, wireframes are a waste of time too.
> >>
> >> You should just sit down and code.
> >>
> >> Code, code, code. That's the way we get things done around here.
> >>
> >> And don't worry about crafting bug free code. That takes time and
> >> never pays off. Any code will do.
> >>
> >> Remember our motto: Once you remove quality as a requirement,
> >> everything else becomes a whole lot easier.
> >>
> >> Jared
> >>
> >> ________________________________________________________________
> >> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> >> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> >> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> >> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

3 Feb 2010 - 10:01am
William Hudson
2009

It looks like Jared needs one of them thar new-fangled sarcasm marks<g>.
See
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/6995354/Sarcasm-punctuation-m
ark-aims-to-put-an-end-to-email-confusion.html

Regards,

William Hudson
Syntagm Ltd
Design for Usability
UK 01235-522859
World +44-1235-522859
US Toll Free 1-866-SYNTAGM
mailto:william.hudson at syntagm.co.uk
http://www.syntagm.co.uk
skype:williamhudsonskype

Syntagm is a limited company registered in England and Wales (1985).
Registered number: 1895345. Registered office: 10 Oxford Road, Abingdon
OX14 2DS.

Attend our courses on Ajax design & usability, card sorting and web
usability:
CHI 2010 Conference (Atlanta, Georgia) http://www.chi2010.org
UPA 2010 Conference (Munich, Germany) http://bit.ly/8x9NU

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
Jared Spool
Sent: 03 February 2010 14:48
To: Anjali Arora
Cc: IXDA list
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Sketching before the Wireframes

On Feb 3, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Anjali Arora wrote:

> I agree with Jared about cutting straight to the chase, & focusing
> on just building things.

3 Feb 2010 - 10:20am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Actually, I vote that we use a picture of Jared's head as a sarcasm mark. ;^)

Jack

On Feb 3, 2010, at 10:01 AM, William Hudson wrote:

> It looks like Jared needs one of them thar new-fangled sarcasm marks<g>.
> See
> http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/6995354/Sarcasm-punctuation-m
> ark-aims-to-put-an-end-to-email-confusion.html

Jack L. Moffett
Senior Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

When I am working on a problem,
I never think about beauty.
I think only of how to solve the problem.

But when I have finished,
if the solution is not beautiful,
I know it is wrong.

- R. Buckminster Fuller

3 Feb 2010 - 10:35am
Justin Davis
2008

Richard -

This is probably a long shot, but if you feel passionate about the
cause of sketching (as you should), would it be possible to convince
the leadership in the company to take part in a workshop that you put
together? Put together a program that presents a design problem, and
have half the participants sketch, then wireframe, and the other half
only wireframe.

Take those final solutions and put them in front of users (could be
other people in the company who aren't participants), to see which
process wins out. I'd bet money that the sketch/wireframe process wins
over the wireframing-only process, due to the amount of ideas that can
be generated quickly in a rough form before codifying to a digital
format.

There are probably more ways you could structure a workshop like this,
but I think putting them in the designer's shoes for a bit might help
drive the point home.

Sometimes the best way to prove them wrong is to have them prove
themselves wrong.

Justin

3 Feb 2010 - 11:11am
Sean Gerety
2009

Richard,

During software architecture discussions it is very common for designs to be
performed on a whiteboard prior to any kind of UML tool being used. I dare
to say that if you company would take issue with sketching prior to
wireframes, they would also have to take issue with the software team doing
the same.

Happy Sketching...

Sean
On Wed, Feb 3, 2010 at 1:02 AM, Richard Carson
<richard.carson75 at gmail.com>wrote:

> Thanks everyone,
>
> For all the wonderful responses and support for sketching. It looks like
> EVERYONE, gave power to the sketching, before the wireframes process.
> Surprisingly not one person ever mention that sketching was a waste of time.
> Really...Not one?
>
> However, the same cannot be said for the company I just started working
> with, who cannot get on onboard with the paper or even a whiteboard
> process.The response I get is... "sketching is for your own personal
> purposes. We just need to see the wireframes." So they'll put their input
> into the designing the UI, but never fully understanding how the application
> actually works.
>
> Richard
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

3 Feb 2010 - 5:12pm
zakiwarfel
2004

pssst... he was being sarcastic.

On Feb 3, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Anjali Arora wrote:

> I agree with Jared about cutting straight to the chase, & focusing on just building things. However, it is rarely an either-or situation, but rather one of degree; while trying to build something, I find it useful to make quick paper doodles/sketches of the various states, for example. Helps to clear one's mind before starting to code.
> -Anjali

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Principal Designer, messagefirst
Author of Prototyping: a practitioner's guide http://bit.ly/protobk
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at zakiwarfel.com
Blog: zakiwarfel.com
Twitter: @zakiwarfel
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

3 Feb 2010 - 5:23pm
mcaskey
2008

Whoa whoa, this is getting sketchy guys...

But really, howzabout more talk about really quick (rapid) prototypes, especially for webby things?!?

I'm impressed by the whole Flash Catalyst thing, but I really want to export standards-based stuff.

What are you guys using for rapid web prototyping right now?

Thanks!

Mike

On Feb 3, 2010, at 3:12 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> pssst... he was being sarcastic.
>
> On Feb 3, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Anjali Arora wrote:
>
>> I agree with Jared about cutting straight to the chase, & focusing on just building things. However, it is rarely an either-or situation, but rather one of degree; while trying to build something, I find it useful to make quick paper doodles/sketches of the various states, for example. Helps to clear one's mind before starting to code.
>> -Anjali
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> Principal Designer, messagefirst
> Author of Prototyping: a practitioner's guide http://bit.ly/protobk
> ----------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at zakiwarfel.com
> Blog: zakiwarfel.com
> Twitter: @zakiwarfel
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

3 Feb 2010 - 6:39pm
zakiwarfel
2004

paper. fireworks. html/css/javascript.

On Feb 3, 2010, at 5:23 PM, Michael Caskey wrote:

> What are you guys using for rapid web prototyping right now?

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Principal Designer, messagefirst
Author of Prototyping: a practitioner's guide http://bit.ly/protobk
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at zakiwarfel.com
Blog: zakiwarfel.com
Twitter: @zakiwarfel
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

3 Feb 2010 - 6:41pm
zakiwarfel
2004

In fact, I think there might be an entire book on this http://bit.ly/protobk

On Feb 3, 2010, at 5:23 PM, Michael Caskey wrote:

> What are you guys using for rapid web prototyping right now?

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Principal Designer, messagefirst
Author of Prototyping: a practitioner's guide http://bit.ly/protobk
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at zakiwarfel.com
Blog: zakiwarfel.com
Twitter: @zakiwarfel
----------------------------------
In theory, theory and practice are the same.
In practice, they are not.

3 Feb 2010 - 6:57pm
mcaskey
2008

I set myself up for that one.

I definitely plan to read it Todd! I'm a regular user of your work... used your Ai wireframe template several years back, and I've found it useful several times over.

Hmmm... hope Prototyping comes up in Safari Bookshelf...

Mike Caskey

On Feb 3, 2010, at 4:41 PM, Todd Zaki Warfel wrote:

> In fact, I think there might be an entire book on this http://bit.ly/protobk
>
> On Feb 3, 2010, at 5:23 PM, Michael Caskey wrote:
>
>> What are you guys using for rapid web prototyping right now?
>
>
> Cheers!
>
> Todd Zaki Warfel
> Principal Designer, messagefirst
> Author of Prototyping: a practitioner's guide http://bit.ly/protobk
> ----------------------------------
> Contact Info
> Voice: (215) 825-7423
> Email: todd at zakiwarfel.com
> Blog: zakiwarfel.com
> Twitter: @zakiwarfel
> ----------------------------------
> In theory, theory and practice are the same.
> In practice, they are not.
>

3 Feb 2010 - 7:57pm
Sally Abolrous
2009

I agree with all the pro-sketchers; sketching is an important part of
the design process - especially for the designer. I think that for
you, and perhaps your team members, sketching on a white board or
paper is an important step for getting your ideas down, figuring out
what works and what doesn't work, and brainstorming design ideas.

However, when it comes to your stakeholders, this doesn't
necessarily have to be a part of their process; it's a designer's
tool.

After you get your thoughts down, however you like, give them a rough
sketch or different options in Visio or Illustrator - this will help
them visualize the different options AND is easier than paper or a
white board to distribute. I would make these very rough though so
that people don't get distracted by the visuals or the layout. Also
I wouldn't include all the interaction details in this rough sketch
- just the screens that need to be agreed upon and explored before
moving on to the detailed wireframes.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924

4 Feb 2010 - 6:14am
Shelly Cawood
2009

I start of with intial sketches in pencil in a layout pad
(lightweight semi transparent 80gsm paper) then i move onto sketching
up the more sucessful ideas from my sketches upto A3 size using
sharpies, or similar.

Some clients this is the first thing they see from us, in the form of
workshops, so as to be involved in the process before things start
being formalised by working the wire frames up in Omnigraffle or
similar

after this I move to Omnigraffle

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924

3 Feb 2010 - 8:26pm
Giridhar Chandr...
2009

Thats a nice discussion going on here..

Here are my thoughts from my personal experience.

Sketching in paper is a good tool when you put on your thinking hats and
start with the process of brainstorming.
But when it comes to presenting your ideas either to top-management or to
the client, wireframes work the best.
In some cases (with a lot of strange and technically disconnected clients
out there) a high definition interactive wireframe is required to pass on
thought process.

On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 12:57 AM, Sally Abolrous <sallya at hotmail.com> wrote:

> I agree with all the pro-sketchers; sketching is an important part of
> the design process - especially for the designer. I think that for
> you, and perhaps your team members, sketching on a white board or
> paper is an important step for getting your ideas down, figuring out
> what works and what doesn't work, and brainstorming design ideas.
>
> However, when it comes to your stakeholders, this doesn't
> necessarily have to be a part of their process; it's a designer's
> tool.
>
> After you get your thoughts down, however you like, give them a rough
> sketch or different options in Visio or Illustrator - this will help
> them visualize the different options AND is easier than paper or a
> white board to distribute. I would make these very rough though so
> that people don't get distracted by the visuals or the layout. Also
> I wouldn't include all the interaction details in this rough sketch
> - just the screens that need to be agreed upon and explored before
> moving on to the detailed wireframes.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

4 Feb 2010 - 11:34am
ferg
2010

So how do you actually get the sketches in usage instead of
hi-fi-shiny wireframes? Some options Richard:

[1a] Take an interaction, sketch it up, and then slip it under the
nose of developer[s] outside of the standard meetings they see the
wireframes in and position as just that - a sketch you were wanting
THEIR thoughts on. Your being collaborative.

[1b] Do it with a stakeholder. Allow choice. Sketch 4 or 5 different
options - its a sketch so it should be quicker. Again, dont replace
your wireframes. Not straight away

Once they've bitten/got used to/sat up and engaged with [and they
will]...

[2] Scamp up something important, but again position it as 'before
the wireframes' and include a choice element.

This can be used now in your standard client/developer encounter.

Now your starting to split out:
[a] new stuff - scamps come with choice - they will like the choice
element

[b] pretty wireframes are for proper reviews and edits

And then you'll know when and where you'll be comfortable with
sketching and scamping.

Best of luck
Ferg

p.s. I too have been banging on about sketching:
Owning the Interaction in Dynamic Environments, UPA conference, Dec
2008: http://gomitech.co.uk/?page_id=83

Teaching storyboarding at Foviance: http://gomitech.co.uk/?p=89

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924

4 Feb 2010 - 12:09pm
Jeremy White
2008

After showing a scanned sketch to one client, she replied "Hmm...I
don't like the style. Looks like it was drawn. That's not what
we're going for."

Duh!
So my suggestion is to make sure they know a sketch is just a sketch!
;-)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924

4 Feb 2010 - 4:44pm
Alan James Salmoni
2008

Jeremy: I've had something similar which I guess pointed to a failure
in communication.

"It looks like it was sketched up in 15 minutes!" said the
skeptical DBA.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924

4 Feb 2010 - 8:28pm
Mayur Karnik
2007

Hmm...

I decide what to do depending on many things. It's always a combination of
few factors..

Am I talking to myself, exploring some ideas at a high level with no worries
of showing / communicating to anyone else about it? In that case I sketch,
because it's a good way to start.

Am I working in a group and co-creating? Sketching on whiteboards or big A2
sheets pinned on boards is good. Take digital copies of the same and
distribute to everyone afterwards with a summary of the discussion.

Am I collaborating remotely with someone? Realtime - discuss on skype,
sketch, show on camera or send a scan or sketch on screen and share. Not
realtime - sketch with some notes / explanatory post-its, take a photo and
send by mail with a summary of your thoughts.

Do I need to show this to someone for approval? If it's a designer - no
worries, sketch. If it's a client (marketing / technical) - does he know my
way of working / have I worked with the client before? / does the client
side contact need to communicate or share it with others for approval or
anything? how much time do I have? In my experience, sending Visio
wireframes to clients helps since they identify it as a progress from the
'sketching stage' towards a more finished product. Also, it becomes easier
for them to communicate amongst themselves. Sometimes you send sketches and
wait till eternity for a response and then you figure out that they took it
just as a 'status update' of a process begun and were waiting for 'more
work'. If you are presenting to a client, then it's best to take print outs
of wireframes and sketch on it while discussing with them; it pays to
convert client presentations into small workshops.

How much time do I have or the client have? What are the dependencies; are
the developers / engineers / product designers / vendors waiting for me to
sync their planning? What is my fluency with the tools I am using / how fast
am I in converting a change request into an active dialogue with these
tools? Where am I right now? (the good thing about sketching is that you can
do it anytime, anywhere in any circumstances... well, almost any
circumstances). Am I multi-tasking on different projects that are at
different phases of development?

This is an interesting discussion. What is a good analogy for sketching?
Sketching for a designer is like scribbling thoughts for a writer lets
say... however, some prefer typing straight on typewriters; that ways they
write with some more seriousness and focus. With computers, the backspace
key is a bitch - it leaves you typing aimlessly sometimes (at least in my
case) since you know correcting it isn't the same as putting white ink on
something... What about cooking? You can't have low-fidelity versions of
what you are cooking; you just have to do it right...

Cheers,
Mayur Karnik

On Thu, Feb 4, 2010 at 1:44 PM, Alan Salmoni <alan at usernumber1.com> wrote:

> Jeremy: I've had something similar which I guess pointed to a failure
> in communication.
>
> "It looks like it was sketched up in 15 minutes!" said the
> skeptical DBA.
>
>
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

16 Feb 2010 - 5:10pm
Jean-Philippe Cyr
2010

I've been an UX designer for the past 7 years now. And even if I did clean cut wireframes in Visio, I can tell you that wireframes are a waste of time, in any circumstances. It is just cutting time in what you really should do: designing, coding, interacting with you product.

But what I can certainly suggest is to sketch. I find that a whiteboard or blackboard are the best for few reasons: you cannot go into too much details plus it is way easier to brainstorm with someone else and to present it to anyone. Plus everyone can participate easily.

When I'm satisfied with my concept, I ask the designer, developer, everyone who can be involve with the project to sit in front of it and I explain the concept and the interaction. I sent them a photo of the blackboards and we are ready to go for the next step: doing it. Until our next challenge.

It is the industry (marketing agencies, software development firms) who claim to need clean-cut wireframes, but in the end if we can work all together, we don't need it.

17 Feb 2010 - 11:34am
Ed Rice
2008

I am sitting down to start some wireframes right now. First I will
sketch. Then finalize them in omnigraffle.

I recently test wireframes as an interactive prototype and found
several problems with the structure and layout of the site. The
wireframes changed significantly and the designer was relieved. Had
the changes been requested after the site was designed it would have
taken twice as long to change the PSD's from the designer.

I like wireframes. They focus on the functionality. Clients get too
distracted by design.

I've seen designers completely botch interfaces by rushing into
graphics.

But it seem everyone agrees on pencil and paper ( or whiteboard) to
start.

I'm starting now.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924

18 Feb 2010 - 12:37pm
Krystal Higgins
2008

I think this has been wholly answered, but I'll add my two cents:

- I always, always, always sketch first. I do a ton of sketching.
It allows me to get all of my ideas out (the "what if" phase), and
allows me to have more focus when I get into wireframing. Sketching
is portable, cheap and fast.

- I do show my sketches (and even involve in my sketching phase) my
direct manager, other creatives, and the developers

- I don't show the sketches to high-level stakeholders; mostly
because I don't get that many meetings with them, and so it's
better use of their time to show something more refined. They're
more interested in the scenarios/research behind the wireframes than
seeing how sketches led to those wireframes.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924

19 Feb 2010 - 3:10pm
Joe Sokohl
2004

I love this thread--it reminds me of the time back in 1991 when, as a
technical writer, I had to deal with the project owner who popped his
head into our conference room (where we were feverishly learning their
AS400 order processing system, diagramming interaction flow, and
sketching tasks) and said, "I don't hear any typing. Why aren't
you working?"

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924

19 Feb 2010 - 9:02pm
regnard
2006

I think it depends on the situation. Ideally, wireframes should be done, but
I recently ahd a client that was really rushing things and had a tight
deadline. They prodded me to come up with a mockup that approximated the
final version of the website.

Was the client happy? Absolutely. They were marketing folks who wanted to
get things done and do away with the engineering.

On Thu, Feb 18, 2010 at 5:37 PM, Krystal Higgins <
kryshiggins at kryshiggins.com> wrote:

> I think this has been wholly answered, but I'll add my two cents:
>
> - I always, always, always sketch first. I do a ton of sketching.
> It allows me to get all of my ideas out (the "what if" phase), and
> allows me to have more focus when I get into wireframing. Sketching
> is portable, cheap and fast.
>
> - I do show my sketches (and even involve in my sketching phase) my
> direct manager, other creatives, and the developers
>
> - I don't show the sketches to high-level stakeholders; mostly
> because I don't get that many meetings with them, and so it's
> better use of their time to show something more refined. They're
> more interested in the scenarios/research behind the wireframes than
> seeing how sketches led to those wireframes.
>
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=48924
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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--
Regnard Raquedan, MBA, Msc.

mobile: +63.919.2907711
email: regnard at raquedan.com
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blog: http://www.RegnardRaquedan.com

--
Follow me! http://www.twitter.com/regnard

20 Feb 2010 - 10:08am
zakiwarfel
2004

On Feb 19, 2010, at 9:02 PM, Regnard Raquedan wrote:

> I think it depends on the situation. Ideally, wireframes should be done, but I recently ahd a client that was really rushing things and had a tight deadline. They prodded me to come up with a mockup that approximated the final version of the website.

We go directly from sketches to prototypes. Unless you consider our sketches wireframes..., but then that changes the argument.

Cheers!

Todd Zaki Warfel
Principal Designer, messagefirst
Author of Prototyping: a practitioner's guide http://bit.ly/protobk
----------------------------------
Contact Info
Voice: (215) 825-7423
Email: todd at zakiwarfel.com
Blog: zakiwarfel.com
Twitter: @zakiwarfel
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In practice, they are not.

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