Usability & users with mental health issues anddisorders

2 Dec 2009 - 9:29am
5 years ago
1 reply
499 reads
William Hudson
2009

I would make sure that the content was easy to read. Look into
readability metrics just as a quick way of checking that language is not
too complex. Text to be read by most adults should score between 60-70
on the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES). This can be calculated by
Microsoft Word (Tools->Options->Spelling & Grammar->Show Readability
Statistics in most versions) or by any number of free tools and web
sites. Note that readability statistics are just a crude check. Lewis
Carroll's poem, Jabberwocky, scores very well on the FRES but makes no
sense at all<g>.

Regards,

William Hudson
Syntagm Ltd
Design for Usability
UK 01235-522859
World +44-1235-522859
US Toll Free 1-866-SYNTAGM
mailto:william.hudson at syntagm.co.uk
http://www.syntagm.co.uk
skype:williamhudsonskype

Syntagm is a limited company registered in England and Wales (1985).
Registered number: 1895345. Registered office: 10 Oxford Road, Abingdon
OX14 2DS.

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
charles Sue-Wah-Sing
Sent: 01 December 2009 11:20
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Usability & users with mental health issues
anddisorders

I'm in the definition phase of a site redesign for a mental health
and addiction association and rehab center...

Comments

2 Dec 2009 - 9:38am
suewah
2008

Thanks for the reply. Content is a big concern. I'm afraid that what
we have is too clinical and complex that it may trigger emotional
issues with the reader - like fear or overwhelm. But of course the
other issue to contend with is a content rewrite of potentially
hundreds of pages.

Charles Sue-Wah-Sing
User Experience Consultant
www.suewahsing.com

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=47735

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