Is there a good reason to require people to idtheir credit card?

29 Sep 2009 - 3:56am
4 years ago
4 replies
396 reads
William Hudson
2009

There are many sources for credit card prefixes (as well as check digit
algorithms) for validating credit cards. For example,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_card_number

I think as long as users are clear what cards you accept there is no
need to ask. For me, it is almost always Amex that I have trouble with,
so I check that Amex is listed before I get too far. I have never known
a 'grown-up' MasterCard or Visa not to work. (My daughter has a teen-age
version which is so badly supported by some sites and stores, which say
they accept it and then don't, that she has actually lost her confidence
in using it. Part of this is the bank's fault for changing the name of
the thing so many times.)

Regards,

William Hudson
Syntagm Ltd
Design for Usability
UK 01235-522859
World +44-1235-522859
US Toll Free 1-866-SYNTAGM
mailto:william.hudson at syntagm.co.uk
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> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-
> bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Jared Spool
> Sent: 28 September 2009 11:24 PM
> To: Amy Jones
> Cc: discuss at ixda.org
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Is there a good reason to require people
to
> idtheir credit card?

Comments

29 Sep 2009 - 8:18am
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Sep 29, 2009, at 4:56 AM, William Hudson wrote:

> There are many sources for credit card prefixes (as well as check
> digit
> algorithms) for validating credit cards. For example,
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_card_number

Part of the problem, as pointed out by the chart, is different cards
have different number lengths. They range from 13 digits to 16 digits.
For example, someone who accidentally leaves the first digit off of
their mastercard or visa could look like a valid amex card.

Again, it depends when you're doing your authorization check. If
you're processing immediately during the users' session, you don't
need to ask for the card type because an entry error will be caught
(assuming you've got a decent merchant processor).

However, lots of purchase systems do a deferred authorization check,
to allow the seller to have a look at the transaction before its put
through the system (often for additional fraud protection or inventory
clearance). In this instance, it's better to ask for the card type to
give you a piece of redundant information for the validity check.

In shopping cart and checkout systems, things are rarely as easy as
they seem.

Jared

Jared M. Spool
User Interface Engineering
510 Turnpike St., Suite 102, North Andover, MA 01845
e: jspool at uie.com p: +1 978 327 5561
http://uie.com Blog: http://uie.com/brainsparks Twitter: @jmspool

29 Sep 2009 - 8:55am
William Hudson
2009

Jared -

Ø In shopping cart and checkout systems, things are rarely as easy as they seem.

You could substitute many things for 'shopping cart and checkout' but it's our job as designers to make this 'magic' happen with minimum inconvenience to users. Naturally, it's a trade off, but my feeling is that it just doesn't help very much to ask for the credit card type. It's virtually impossible to get a valid credit card number from a missed digit and you already have name, expiry date CCV, address and DNA sample to fall back on. (I was kidding about the DNA sample, but the guy who invented DNA fingerprinting apparently foresees a world where we would just spit into something to make a payment - it sounds unhygienic to me! See the current issue of New Scientist.)

Regards,

William

From: Jared Spool [mailto:jspool at uie.com]
Sent: 29 September 2009 2:18 PM
To: William Hudson
Cc: Amy Jones; discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Is there a good reason to require people to idtheir credit card?

On Sep 29, 2009, at 4:56 AM, William Hudson wrote:

There are many sources for credit card prefixes (as well as check digit
algorithms) for validating credit cards. For example,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_card_number

Part of the problem, as pointed out by the chart, is different cards have different number lengths. They range from 13 digits to 16 digits. For example, someone who accidentally leaves the first digit off of their mastercard or visa could look like a valid amex card.

Again, it depends when you're doing your authorization check. If you're processing immediately during the users' session, you don't need to ask for the card type because an entry error will be caught (assuming you've got a decent merchant processor).

However, lots of purchase systems do a deferred authorization check, to allow the seller to have a look at the transaction before its put through the system (often for additional fraud protection or inventory clearance). In this instance, it's better to ask for the card type to give you a piece of redundant information for the validity check.

In shopping cart and checkout systems, things are rarely as easy as they seem.

Jared

Jared M. Spool
User Interface Engineering
510 Turnpike St., Suite 102, North Andover, MA 01845
e: jspool at uie.com p: +1 978 327 5561
http://uie.com Blog: http://uie.com/brainsparks Twitter: @jmspool

29 Sep 2009 - 9:04am
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Sep 29, 2009, at 9:55 AM, William Hudson wrote:

> It’s virtually impossible to get a valid credit card number from a
> missed digit and you already have name, expiry date CCV, address and
> DNA sample to fall back on.

No, but you can detect the error sooner. (Again, it really depends on
the process you're using for authorization. In deferred authorization
cases, this is what I'd recommend.)

Jared

29 Sep 2009 - 10:00am
Jennifer Vignone
2008

I think that a part of the reason for asking is to show the user what methods of payment and types of cards are accepted.
A user may have a few credit cards and this gives them a chance to see which ones are accepted, and decide which one they want to use.
Not every business accepts all credit cards.
There are also instances where a user may want to use the card for that store (example would be a Macy's charge card).
I would rather see a list of the cards I can use to see which ones are accepted and make my decision before entering numbers rather than enter a card number to find that it isn't accepted.
Also, the credit card selection stage is sometimes grouped with the selection of PayPal, which doesn't require a card number entry.

Jennifer

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of William Hudson
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2009 9:56 AM
To: Jared Spool
Cc: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Is there a good reason to require people to idtheir credit card?

Jared -

Ø In shopping cart and checkout systems, things are rarely as easy as they seem.

You could substitute many things for 'shopping cart and checkout' but it's our job as designers to make this 'magic' happen with minimum inconvenience to users. Naturally, it's a trade off, but my feeling is that it just doesn't help very much to ask for the credit card type. It's virtually impossible to get a valid credit card number from a missed digit and you already have name, expiry date CCV, address and DNA sample to fall back on. (I was kidding about the DNA sample, but the guy who invented DNA fingerprinting apparently foresees a world where we would just spit into something to make a payment - it sounds unhygienic to me! See the current issue of New Scientist.)

Regards,

William

From: Jared Spool [mailto:jspool at uie.com]
Sent: 29 September 2009 2:18 PM
To: William Hudson
Cc: Amy Jones; discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Is there a good reason to require people to idtheir credit card?

On Sep 29, 2009, at 4:56 AM, William Hudson wrote:

There are many sources for credit card prefixes (as well as check digit
algorithms) for validating credit cards. For example,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_card_number

Part of the problem, as pointed out by the chart, is different cards have different number lengths. They range from 13 digits to 16 digits. For example, someone who accidentally leaves the first digit off of their mastercard or visa could look like a valid amex card.

Again, it depends when you're doing your authorization check. If you're processing immediately during the users' session, you don't need to ask for the card type because an entry error will be caught (assuming you've got a decent merchant processor).

However, lots of purchase systems do a deferred authorization check, to allow the seller to have a look at the transaction before its put through the system (often for additional fraud protection or inventory clearance). In this instance, it's better to ask for the card type to give you a piece of redundant information for the validity check.

In shopping cart and checkout systems, things are rarely as easy as they seem.

Jared

Jared M. Spool
User Interface Engineering
510 Turnpike St., Suite 102, North Andover, MA 01845
e: jspool at uie.com p: +1 978 327 5561
http://uie.com Blog: http://uie.com/brainsparks Twitter: @jmspool

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