Input needed for courses in Design for Security

25 Sep 2009 - 2:27am
4 years ago
8 replies
857 reads
Arjan Haring
2003

My first question on this platform. Well here it goes:

I am restructuring my Experience Design courses for 1st and 2nd year
bachelor students of Security Technology and I would really
appreciate your input. I've already renamed the course "Design for
Security", because it seems to convey the goal of the course
better.

So I want to use methods en techniques from the design discipline to
create more secure/safe environments. Information security is not
what the program is focused on. Main focus is to prevent and detect
man made catastrophes and criminal behaviour, it is has gotten
momentum after the 9/11 attacks. Students are going to work within
the police, army, customs and other security technology consultancy
or supplies companies.

1st year
Don Norman's recent essay in Interactions,
http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/when_security_gets_in_the_way.html would be
the best description of what I want to accomplish in the first year.
Mixing usability and user centered design with developing a security
system. Get to know the user needs and goals in the security domain
in order to achieve the highest possible acceptance of a security
system.

2nd year
Would be more about the funky stuff. I would like to address a
coherent selection of the following aspects:
- using design to increase/decrease perceived security
- using design to make decisions more rational (less or more risk
aversive, less cognitively biased)
- using design to influence (persuade) people to act more moral.

I've heard of an example that Yo Kaminaga, head of the design
department of the RATP (Parisian Metro), used design to decrease (the
costs of) vandalism and petty crime. Those kind of examples would be
very nice to have in more detail.

I have 4 - 6 months to work things out in concrete case studies and
teaching materials. So I hope some IxDA-ers can help me out offering
thoughts and examples.

Thanks a lot!

Comments

25 Sep 2009 - 11:29am
jodah
2009

This sounds like a very interesting course! This is not my area of
expertise, so what Im about to suggest is perhaps already on the
table, or too basic for the course. However, The Malcolm Gladwell
book "the Tipping Point", is an easy and provocative read. I
believe the whole book might be indirectly relevant to the course,
but his chapter about New York and the "Broken Window" theory is
eye opening. Perhaps there are better sources to learn about this
theory, but he does a pretty good job of illustrating its basic
points in a 50 page chapter.

I also heard about an on-going "broken Window" study happening in
the Holland Slums right now. Just heard about it yesterday on the
radio. Might want to look into that and get some current info on the
matter.

Cheers
Jodah Jensen

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25 Sep 2009 - 2:27pm
Adrian Howard
2005

On 25 Sep 2009, at 00:27, Arjan Haring wrote:

> My first question on this platform. Well here it goes:
>
> I am restructuring my Experience Design courses for 1st and 2nd year
> bachelor students of Security Technology and I would really
> appreciate your input. I've already renamed the course "Design for
> Security", because it seems to convey the goal of the course
> better.
[snip]

Sounds fascinating!

Just in case you've not come across it already - you might find the
hci-sec mailing list a useful place to ask the questions (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hcisec/
)

Cheers,

Adrian
--
http://quietstars.com - twitter.com/adrianh - delicious.com/adrianh

25 Sep 2009 - 2:40pm
Dana Chisnell
2008

I am currently working on a project on usability and security. My
first step is a literature review. That has revealed that there is a
lot of research work out there, and several books.

You might want to start by investing in a book called Security and
Usability: Designing Secure Systems That People Can Use, edited by
Lorrie Faith Cranor and Simson Garfinkle (O'Reilly). It's a
compilation of many seminal articles on the topic, many of which
include examples.

My deadline for completing the lit review is the end of November. If
my project sponsor will allow, I'll share that with you when
they're ready to go public.

Dana
dana at usabilityworks.net

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27 Sep 2009 - 9:47am
DampeS8N
2008

Just don't forget that your user's are part of the security of your
system. Requiring a password system they have no choice but to write
down, for example, is LESS secure than a password of their choice
that has the option to be changed each month but can be set back to
the same thing and is salted liberally.

The first is more secure, if everyone was using safe password storing
procedures. They won't. So the second at least isolates them if their
password is cracked, which would have been the case in both scenarios
and more common in the first.

I'd say remembering that your users are cogs in the security machine
and that they will sidestep anything they can in the name of
convenience, is the most important thing you can teach any security
student.

Because the most technically secure systems are normally the ones you
can walk into any building and nab a password for by lifting
keyboards.

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28 Sep 2009 - 2:02am
Arjan Haring
2003

Hi,

Thanks for the excellent feedback.

@Jodah: I didn't know we have slums here in Holland. ;-) But I will
look into it, would be nice to invite one of the researchers to one
of the classes.
And thanks for pointing out the tipping point (no punch intended).
After reading Blink! I stay away from Gladwell's books because IMHO
he loses sight of science in his love for anecdotes. Nevertheless I
would like to see if I can use this anecdote for spicing up the
classes.

@Adrian: Just joined the list. Thanks!

@Dana: Wow. That would be very cool, please keep me posted. And I
have just asked O'Reilly to sent me a desk copy of Security and
Usability. Looks like a great to book to use for my classes.

@William: Thanks, it indeed is my intention to put the user in to the
equation of security technology.

Great way to start on IxDA. If you have more thoughts.

Please let me know. I appreciate all the help I can get.

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28 Sep 2009 - 5:06pm
Oleh Kovalchuke
2006

The "Broken Window" theory was analyzed and disproved in another (and
better) popular science book -- Freakonomics.

Oleh Kovalchuke
Interaction Design is design of time
http://www.tangospring.com/IxDtopicWhatIsInteractionDesign.htm

On Fri, Sep 25, 2009 at 4:29 AM, jodah jensen <jodah.jensen at gmail.com>wrote:

> This sounds like a very interesting course! This is not my area of
> expertise, so what Im about to suggest is perhaps already on the
> table, or too basic for the course. However, The Malcolm Gladwell
> book "the Tipping Point", is an easy and provocative read. I
> believe the whole book might be indirectly relevant to the course,
> but his chapter about New York and the "Broken Window" theory is
> eye opening. Perhaps there are better sources to learn about this
> theory, but he does a pretty good job of illustrating its basic
> points in a 50 page chapter.
>
> I also heard about an on-going "broken Window" study happening in
> the Holland Slums right now. Just heard about it yesterday on the
> radio. Might want to look into that and get some current info on the
> matter.
>
> Cheers
> Jodah Jensen
>
>
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=46059
>
>
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28 Sep 2009 - 7:29pm
Jeremy Yuille
2007

Arjan, its *great* to see design approaches being explored in a program like
this!
another approach might be to bring the design *process* to the surface, to
compliment things that focus on the subject matter (security)

eg in your 2nd year course, you talk about influence & perception of
security.. you could imagine exploring this by setting projects that involve
extreme cases of security perception and or influence; with outcomes that
range from 'solutions' to 'provocations'.

eg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sousveillance

at one extreme, work by Tony Dunne and Fiona Raby at RCA might also be
inspiring here.. http://www.interaction.rca.ac.uk/index.html

happy to discuss this more if you like.

cheers
jy

29 Sep 2009 - 1:53am
Arjan Haring
2003

@Oleh Thanks, I have Freakonomics laying on my bookshelf. So I am
interested in both sides of the story.

@Jeremy Thanks a lot. You gave me some really nice new angles on the
matter at hand. My friend Bas Raijmakers did his PhD at RCA on Design
Documentaries, and somehow I think they could also fit in. I will
contact you once I I have more concrete ideas.

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