Shop or Buy?

22 Sep 2009 - 2:18pm
4 years ago
11 replies
906 reads
Sachin Ghodke
2008

What is the appropriate button to use on the product detail page when
the website navigation asks the user to either Shop or Buy?

Of course, can we get a little more interesting and personal? For
example: instead of Shop or Buy can we use buttons that say - 'Go
and Pamper' (for a gifts e-commerce website) or 'Educate Yourself'
(while buying education books) or 'Push Limits' (while e-shopping
for BASE jumping equipment). Maybe there are smaller phrases or terms
we can use but you get the drift of what I am asking.

What I am trying to say here is that why can't we portray these user
actions on a more personal level? Making web personal?

Comments

22 Sep 2009 - 2:22pm
Sachin Ghodke
2008

What is the appropriate button to use on the product detail page when
the website navigation asks the user to either Shop or Buy?

Of course, can we get a little more interesting and personal? For
example: instead of Shop or Buy can we use buttons that say - 'Go
and Pamper' (for a gifts e-commerce website) or 'Educate Yourself'
(while buying education books) or 'Push Limits' (while e-shopping
for BASE jumping equipment). Maybe there are smaller phrases or terms
we can use but you get the drift of what I am asking.

What I am trying to say here is that why can't we portray these user
actions on a more personal level? Making web personal?

22 Sep 2009 - 2:27pm
Mark Schraad
2006

Shop and buy are two different, but connected activities. (I realize that
does not answer your questions, but it is important as you move towards your
decision).
Mark

On Tue, Sep 22, 2009 at 7:18 AM, Sachin Ghodke <sachyn.ghodke at gmail.com>wrote:

> What is the appropriate button to use on the product detail page when
> the website navigation asks the user to either Shop or Buy?
>
> Of course, can we get a little more interesting and personal? For
> example: instead of Shop or Buy can we use buttons that say - 'Go
> and Pamper' (for a gifts e-commerce website) or 'Educate Yourself'
> (while buying education books) or 'Push Limits' (while e-shopping
> for BASE jumping equipment). Maybe there are smaller phrases or terms
> we can use but you get the drift of what I am asking.
>
> What I am trying to say here is that why can't we portray these user
> actions on a more personal level? Making web personal?
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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>

22 Sep 2009 - 3:00pm
Anonymous

What is it you want your users to do? Keep looking at merchandise or
spend money by making a purchase? While personalization may be a
nice idea, does it serve the business? Clear, conscise language may
be your best choice if what you really want is to is to direct people
to buy. While 'Go and Pamper' may sound like a great idea, it's
wide open to interpretation by every user who accesses your site.

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22 Sep 2009 - 2:51pm
Jennifer Vignone
2008

I think "Shop" is more akin to browsing.
"Buy" is more of the commitment to purchase.

I don't care for the personal touch, or find it a touchy subject because the choice of words can be inappropriate depending on the type of thing being sold, and the tone of the site. For example, your suggestions:

Go and Pamper: I can't say I would ever want to be on a site that used this phrasing. Is this for a spa or very high-end item or some sort?

Educate Yourself: has an air of arrogance that I also find uninviting.

Push Limits: what limits, who created the limits, how do you know my limits?

See what I mean? The many ways of interpreting the tone being suggested by the words is critical.
I prefer "browse" and "buy".
Direct, I know where I stand, no attitude involved.

==============================================================

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Sachin Ghodke
Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2009 8:22 AM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Shop or Buy?

What is the appropriate button to use on the product detail page when
the website navigation asks the user to either Shop or Buy?

Of course, can we get a little more interesting and personal? For
example: instead of Shop or Buy can we use buttons that say - 'Go
and Pamper' (for a gifts e-commerce website) or 'Educate Yourself'
(while buying education books) or 'Push Limits' (while e-shopping
for BASE jumping equipment). Maybe there are smaller phrases or terms
we can use but you get the drift of what I am asking.

What I am trying to say here is that why can't we portray these user
actions on a more personal level? Making web personal?
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22 Sep 2009 - 3:09pm
Stephen Nitz
2009

The button should be clear and simple. Don't make the user think.

The cute and personalized marketing language can go into ads,
banners, headers, etc.

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22 Sep 2009 - 3:10pm
Amy Silvers
2007

I agree with the previous comment. Sometimes conventions are dull and
deserve to be broken, but often they exist for a reason. Personal
touches, wit, and a sense of fun can all contribute to a great
experience and differentiate a site from its competitors, but only if
they don't actually stand in the way of getting them to their goal.

On an e-commerce site, having the customer stop and think, "Okay, I
guess 'go and pamper' means the same thing that 'continue
shopping' means on every other shopping site" is probably not going
to make customers or the business happy. That's not to say that you
can't break convention to some extent--a shoe site that had "OMG I
must have these now!" instead of "Buy" might work, for
example--but if you're going to differ from established practice
(Continue Shopping/Buy Now), be sure that your alternative is as
clear and functional as the standard.

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22 Sep 2009 - 3:48pm
AlinutzaV
2009

While I do agree that keeping things simple is the best solution,
there's an exception to the rule when you have niche products. For
instance I am using this private site called ideeli and they use " I
want it!". They are very successful in making woman buy and I do
thing the syntax is very appropriate. While you can't see how this
button looks like because it's a private site, here's a screenshot
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/aVva34y5gSqnmGvrXNlNhA?authkey=Gv1sRgCOe-ppXJqqbHsQE&feat=directlink

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23 Sep 2009 - 12:45am
Kim van Poelgeest
2009

You're making an excellent point Alina, it is clear to me where to
click when I want to buy. I guess that should answer the question,
but you should find the right copy to convey the message, have it
reviewed with a copywriter and an interaction designer, then test it
on your users. Maybe with A-B split-tests. Alina, if you have such
tests available, I would be much interested in a peak in the results.

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23 Sep 2009 - 5:20am
Anonymous

What does the button do? If the button adds the product to the cart then it should say so: "add to cart"

Get what you see!

24 Sep 2009 - 12:04am
Sachin Ghodke
2008

@Jennifer- Agree with you but what are we doing to make web personal?
As does Alina says "I Want It" is making user action poersonal and
that is a nice touch. Pardon the phrases I used earlier, they were
just to put my point across. Of course, we must find smaller words
for user action. Why engage user in intelligent grammar? Let us still
consider user as the non-thinking one for a long time.
Which raises the question - have we undermined the user's
intelligence? But this discussion is for another time, I presume.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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25 Sep 2009 - 3:33am
Laurence Veale
2008

Ultimately, I think all the opinions above are all valid and the key
thing is context.

However, with the tools now at our disposal, opinion or feeling
shouldn't come into it, we can design with objective confidence
using A/B and multivariate testing.

These tools allow us to take a number of choices and test them with
the market - giving us objective insight into what actually works and
what doesn't.

No plan survives contact with the enemy!

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=45927

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