UX Presentation to the CEO?

19 Aug 2009 - 9:08pm
5 years ago
10 replies
1241 reads
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Hi Navid,

I designed and gave just such a presentation recently to one of our
customers. I can't share the deck, as it is full of examples of
customer work, but I could probably share the outline that includes
all of my talking points if you would find that useful.

Best,
Jack

On Aug 19, 2009, at 3:41 PM, Navid Sadikali wrote:

> Does anyone have any good slide-decks or talks that you would
> reference in
> creating a presentation to the CEO?

Jack L. Moffett
Senior Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

It's not about the world of design;
it's about the design of the world.

- Bruce Mau

Comments

19 Aug 2009 - 11:11pm
Anonymous

I think many of us might find an outline like that useful.

Probably the worst thing ever to happen to me in business was a failed
presentation to the CEO where he started swearing at me 5 min. in and
basically said "F*** off. You're done." Ever since then I've been a
bit shaky to present to the powers that be, even though it's never
happened before or since.

Brandon E. B. Ward
brandonebward at gmail.com
UI • UX • Ix Design
Flex • Flash Development
Portfolio: http://www.uxd.me
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonebward
VisualCV: http://www.visualcv.com/brandonebward

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
- Robert A. Heinlein

On Aug 20, 2009, at 11:08 AM, Jack Moffett wrote:

> Hi Navid,
>
> I designed and gave just such a presentation recently to one of our
> customers. I can't share the deck, as it is full of examples of
> customer work, but I could probably share the outline that includes
> all of my talking points if you would find that useful.
>
> Best,
> Jack
>
>
> On Aug 19, 2009, at 3:41 PM, Navid Sadikali wrote:
>
>> Does anyone have any good slide-decks or talks that you would
>> reference in
>> creating a presentation to the CEO?
>
>
>
>
> Jack L. Moffett
> Senior Interaction Designer
> inmedius
> 412.459.0310 x219
> http://www.inmedius.com
>
>
> It's not about the world of design;
> it's about the design of the world.
>
> - Bruce Mau
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

19 Aug 2009 - 11:45pm
Brian Mila
2009

I would be interested in that outline as well. Also, I'm looking for
samples for how to propose a UX vision, what that vision should
include, and what types of team members would make up an ideal UX
team.

Thanks,
Brian

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19 Aug 2009 - 4:50pm
Amy Ilyse Rosenthal
2008

Check work from Luke Wroblewski:

Articles on Strategy and Design:

A bit specifically on Executive Presentation Tips:

Good luck,

/A

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19 Aug 2009 - 4:02pm
Kevin Tu
2009

I think you have the beginning of a good platform with those few
points already. You can check out slideshare.com, tons of UX decks on
there.

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20 Aug 2009 - 1:04am
Audrey Crane
2009

Navid, can you share more about where they're at now? What's their
current perspective on design? What is their background?

Is there an existing team? Are you trying to make them more central
or staff up, or...?

Much of Marty Cagan's writing is relevant to this. See his book
Inspired, or his newsletters:
http://www.svpg.com/article-index#WorkingWithUserExperienceDesign

He is not a designer, but a design advocate, 100% from the
perspective of making businesses successful.

If any of them have engineering backgrounds, it could be helpful to
bring up Cooper or Nielsen. (I recently gave a preso and specifically
brought up Visual Basic and explicitly said I was bringing it up to
make what I was about to talk about seem credible for those people
with an engineering background. The room full of people knew the EVP
was an engineer. Got a good laugh.)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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20 Aug 2009 - 1:44am
Remko Vermeulen
2009

DonĀ“t jump into academic researches. Get practical.

Just record a small usability test of 1 feature of your product as is and ask the customer what he or she thinks about the product and if he or she would buy it. Then improve one feature (interactive wireframe) test it again.

If you really want to score, do a benchmarking test with the competition.

20 Aug 2009 - 2:30am
dszuc
2005

Hi Navid:

Suggest asking yourself:

1. what you want the CEO and the Executive team to know and action
after he listens to the presentation?

2. what homework/research you need to do about the CEO's
organization and its culture? (how receptive are they to the UX
message?)

3. what problems the CEO may be facing and how the presentation can
help?

4. what you want to happen after you present?

Avoid UX jargon, keep it simple and engage the CEO in example product
experiences that delight him and talk about why.

rgds,
Dan

PS Also don't wear Crocs when you present (even if they are
comfortable ;) I tried this once ... :)

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20 Aug 2009 - 7:54am
Jennifer Vignone
2008

I have given many presentations to CEO, CIOs, heads of business, and the like. The main thing I can share for success is the following:

-- Don't overload.

-- Have your main points in the first five slides of a presentation. Never be surprised if a CEO, CIO, or head of business doesn't have the time to go past those first 5 to 7 pages.

-- Be able to break everything down into bullet points. CEOs, CIOs, and heads of business don't want to wade through anything lengthy. They need to see succinct thought, which tells them also that you know what you're doing and can sum it up into a tight delivery.

-- Charts and graphs work well.

-- Timelines are important. Higher-ups like to know that you have a sense of time, man-hours, and money.

-- Details can follow after you make your core pitch in the first several slides.

I have a template that I use that I can try to dig up if you're interested.
But these point are pretty core to keeping your presentation controlled.

Jennifer

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Navid Sadikali
Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2009 3:41 PM
To: IxDA Discuss
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] UX Presentation to the CEO?

Does anyone have any good slide-decks or talks that you would reference in
creating a presentation to the CEO?
Goals
- make them see the void without design
- suggest an alternative to feature-lists going directly to engineering
- inspire them on a business level, educate them to a "Business Week" level
of design thinking
- suggest the cultural changes that are necessary and the change that must
occur
________________________________________________________________
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20 Aug 2009 - 9:20am
Mark Schraad
2006

Great stuff from Jennifer and David...
I would like to add a couple of things (not specific to Navid's plight, but
applicable to the situation):

First, I hear a lot of designers reliving the story aloud, instead of
telling a story to the specific audience. Our work and deliverables, must be
specific to the audience, just like out products. And, the structure of the
story, is critical... with a beginning, and plot and an ending.

Many CEO's (and lots of other folks) are what we call CAB's. ABC's, like us,
are interested in the problem, foundation, our process, the results and the
conclusions in a logical order. People that are pressed for time, such as
CEO's, are CAB's and often will want you to skip directly to the conclusions
and take aways. It's not always that they don't care about the process and
due diligence, but they don't have the time. This is something you should
find out before presenting... AND, be able to restructure you talk in mid
stream if it becomes obvious. Reading the room is a crucial part of being a
great presenter.

Mark

On Thu, Aug 20, 2009 at 8:54 AM, Jennifer R Vignone <
jennifer.r.vignone at jpmorgan.com> wrote:

> I have given many presentations to CEO, CIOs, heads of business, and the
> like. The main thing I can share for success is the following:
>
> -- Don't overload.
>
> -- Have your main points in the first five slides of a presentation. Never
> be surprised if a CEO, CIO, or head of business doesn't have the time to go
> past those first 5 to 7 pages.
>
> -- Be able to break everything down into bullet points. CEOs, CIOs, and
> heads of business don't want to wade through anything lengthy. They need to
> see succinct thought, which tells them also that you know what you're doing
> and can sum it up into a tight delivery.
>
> -- Charts and graphs work well.
>
> -- Timelines are important. Higher-ups like to know that you have a sense
> of time, man-hours, and money.
>
> -- Details can follow after you make your core pitch in the first several
> slides.
>
> I have a template that I use that I can try to dig up if you're interested.
> But these point are pretty core to keeping your presentation controlled.
>
> Jennifer
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com [mailto:
> discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Navid
> Sadikali
> Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2009 3:41 PM
> To: IxDA Discuss
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] UX Presentation to the CEO?
>
> Does anyone have any good slide-decks or talks that you would reference in
> creating a presentation to the CEO?
> Goals
> - make them see the void without design
> - suggest an alternative to feature-lists going directly to engineering
> - inspire them on a business level, educate them to a "Business Week" level
> of design thinking
> - suggest the cultural changes that are necessary and the change that must
> occur
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> This email is confidential and subject to important disclaimers and
> conditions including on offers for the purchase or sale of
> securities, accuracy and completeness of information, viruses,
> confidentiality, legal privilege, and legal entity disclaimers,
> available at http://www.jpmorgan.com/pages/disclosures/email.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

20 Aug 2009 - 11:26am
Murray Thompson
2009

Navid,

It may be more research than you'd like, but there are also some
books that could be good references for you in preparing. Of the ones
that I've found so far, those most connected to your points on design
thinking and business would be:
* Marty Neumeier's "The Designful Company"
* Adaptive Path's "Subject to Change"

I also see a lot of complementary ideas to design thinking and
business in Peter Senge's "The Fifth Discipline", which focuses on
building a "learning organization". It's a bit more of a read than
the other two, though.

As others have mentioned, knowing more about how your CEO currently
views design would be helpful. But in addition to the other resources
mentioned, you may also find the following article from Jess McMullin
useful in developing your approach:
http://nform.ca/publications/investing-in-design

For the presentation itself: is there a story or situation that could
capture the CEO's interest that you could use to anchor your
presentation? Can you ask him or her beforehand? Use slides, but go
beyond them. And focus on what's in it for the CEO, rather than what
you'd like to impart upon him or her.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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