Documentation requirements

7 Aug 2009 - 7:57am
5 years ago
8 replies
901 reads
Uidude
2009

I understand creating the following different deliverable documents in
order:

1. Creating user personas
2. Scenarios
3. High level use cases document
4. Requirements specifications document
5. Low-level use cases document
6. Design draft documents
7. Wireframes creation
8. Task flow diagrams
9. UI specification document
10. Help manual, user documents

I would like to know where or which from the above includes the
following documents/ document parts:
1. Typography specifications
2. Color palettes info
3. Iconography

At least I know that I have not seen them in any UI specification
documents so far.

Few related questions:
1. These are deliverables by graphic designer, UI designer or
UX practitioner?
2. Who will benefit from them? Who can possibly use them in an
application development senario?
3. How important are they to include in a complex web based
application that involve quite a bit of artistic look and feel UI, or
for example: developing a kiosk UI.

Id be pleased if anyone can hint/ share. Thanks.

Comments

7 Aug 2009 - 8:10am
William Hudson
2009

Shivan -

My thinking is that typography, colour palettes and iconography should
be part of the UI specification. Typography and colour palettes are
primarily an issue of aesthetics, so would be specified by a graphics
designer but approved by a usability/UX practitioner (for legibility and
adequate colour contrast compliance with WCAG 2.0). The requirements for
iconography should be drafted by a usability/UX practitioner,
implemented by a graphics designer and then usability tested.

Regards,

William Hudson
Syntagm Ltd
Design for Usability
UK 01235-522859
World +44-1235-522859
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OX14 2DS.

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: new-bounces at ixda.org [mailto:new-bounces at ixda.org] On Behalf Of
> shivan kannan
> Sent: 07 August 2009 7:57 AM
> To: discuss at ixda.org
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Documentation requirements
...

7 Aug 2009 - 8:36am
jrrogan
2005

Hi Shivan,

I'd put "Typography specifications", "Color palettes info" and "Iconography"
in "UI specifications"

These deliverables are developed primarily by graphic designer, with support
from UI designer/UX practitioner, (Is there a difference between these 2?)

Everyone will benefit from this info, Development, Business, QA, and User,
UX team, Management

They are the design framework from which the application is
designed/developed upon thus all participants would use them in an
application development senario.

They are crucial to include in a complex web based application that involve
quite a bit of artistic look and feel UI, or for example: developing a kiosk
UI.

OK hope this helps,

Rich

--
Joseph Rich Rogan
President UX/UI Inc.
http://www.jrrogan.com

On Fri, Aug 7, 2009 at 2:57 AM, shivan kannan <shivan.kannan at gmail.com>wrote:

> I understand creating the following different deliverable documents in
> order:
>
> 1. Creating user personas
> 2. Scenarios
> 3. High level use cases document
> 4. Requirements specifications document
> 5. Low-level use cases document
> 6. Design draft documents
> 7. Wireframes creation
> 8. Task flow diagrams
> 9. UI specification document
> 10. Help manual, user documents
>
> I would like to know where or which from the above includes the
> following documents/ document parts:
> 1. Typography specifications
> 2. Color palettes info
> 3. Iconography
>
> At least I know that I have not seen them in any UI specification
> documents so far.
>
> Few related questions:
> 1. These are deliverables by graphic designer, UI designer or
> UX practitioner?
> 2. Who will benefit from them? Who can possibly use them in an
> application development senario?
> 3. How important are they to include in a complex web based
> application that involve quite a bit of artistic look and feel UI, or
> for example: developing a kiosk UI.
>
> Id be pleased if anyone can hint/ share. Thanks.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Joseph Rich Rogan
President UX/UI Inc.
http://www.jrrogan.com

7 Aug 2009 - 8:45am
Uidude
2009

@ Fabian:

sorry about the discontinuation:

While the design drafts address project managers, detailed version (UI
specs) are given to people who actually implement them.

7 Aug 2009 - 8:42am
Uidude
2009

@ Fabian: Thanks for response :)

6. Design draft documents are like the 1st iteration of the detailed
UI specification. It contains mostly of visuals that are to be
verified by business owner or project managers. For example, it could
contain those UI layouts with only a brief description about it. While
these design drafts address project managers

@ William: Thanks for response :)

I will wait to hear more such thinking. Not only because I have not
seen them appear so far in ui specs doc, but also wondering who can
possibly benefit from it (again if placed in UI specs doc meant for
coders).

-Shivan

On Fri, Aug 7, 2009 at 7:38 PM, Fabian A<sprocklab at gmail.com> wrote:
> i would say 7. Question though, what are you putting for 6. design
> draft documents?
>
> fabian
>
> On Fri, Aug 7, 2009 at 2:57 AM, shivan kannan<shivan.kannan at gmail.com> wrote:
>> I understand creating the following different deliverable documents in
>> order:
>>
>> 1. Creating user personas
>> 2. Scenarios
>> 3. High level use cases document
>> 4. Requirements specifications document
>> 5. Low-level use cases document
>> 6. Design draft documents
>> 7. Wireframes creation
>> 8. Task flow diagrams
>> 9. UI specification document
>> 10. Help manual, user documents
>>
>> I would like to know where or which from the above includes the
>> following documents/ document parts:
>> 1. Typography specifications
>> 2. Color palettes info
>> 3. Iconography
>>
>> At least I know that I have not seen them in any UI specification
>> documents so far.
>>
>> Few related questions:
>> 1. These are deliverables by graphic designer, UI designer or
>> UX practitioner?
>> 2. Who will benefit from them? Who can possibly use them in an
>> application development senario?
>> 3. How important are they to include in a complex web based
>> application that involve quite a bit of artistic look and feel UI, or
>> for example: developing a kiosk UI.
>>
>> Id be pleased if anyone can hint/ share. Thanks.
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>

--
Shivan Kannan
★ uidude.com
★ uidude.wordpress.com
twitter at uidude

7 Aug 2009 - 9:32am
William Hudson
2009

Shivan -

The UI spec is meant for the folks implementing the UI. They will need to know what colours and fonts are to be used. The wireframes are not detailed enough for this to matter. If you were talking about a desktop UI, the coders actually do need to know what to use for the implementation. In HTML-based systems, someone other than coders may produce the UI, but they should still be looking at the UI specification.

My 2-cents worth!

Regards,

William

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Shivan Kannan [mailto:shivan.kannan at gmail.com]
> Sent: 07 August 2009 3:42 PM
> To: Fabian A; William Hudson
> Cc: discuss at ixda.org
> Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Documentation requirements
>
> @ Fabian: Thanks for response :)
>
> 6. Design draft documents are like the 1st iteration of the detailed
> UI specification. It contains mostly of visuals that are to be
> verified by business owner or project managers. For example, it could
> contain those UI layouts with only a brief description about it. While
> these design drafts address project managers
>
> @ William: Thanks for response :)
>
> I will wait to hear more such thinking. Not only because I have not
> seen them appear so far in ui specs doc, but also wondering who can
> possibly benefit from it (again if placed in UI specs doc meant for
> coders).
>
> -Shivan
>
> On Fri, Aug 7, 2009 at 7:38 PM, Fabian A<sprocklab at gmail.com> wrote:
> > i would say 7. Question though, what are you putting for 6. design
> > draft documents?
> >
> > fabian
> >
> > On Fri, Aug 7, 2009 at 2:57 AM, shivan
> kannan<shivan.kannan at gmail.com> wrote:
> >> I understand creating the following different deliverable documents
> in
> >> order:
> >>
> >> 1. Creating user personas
> >> 2. Scenarios
> >> 3. High level use cases document
> >> 4. Requirements specifications document
> >> 5. Low-level use cases document
> >> 6. Design draft documents
> >> 7. Wireframes creation
> >> 8. Task flow diagrams
> >> 9. UI specification document
> >> 10. Help manual, user documents
> >>
> >> I would like to know where or which from the above includes the
> >> following documents/ document parts:
> >> 1. Typography specifications
> >> 2. Color palettes info
> >> 3. Iconography
> >>
> >> At least I know that I have not seen them in any UI specification
> >> documents so far.
> >>
> >> Few related questions:
> >> 1. These are deliverables by graphic designer, UI designer or
> >> UX practitioner?
> >> 2. Who will benefit from them? Who can possibly use them in an
> >> application development senario?
> >> 3. How important are they to include in a complex web based
> >> application that involve quite a bit of artistic look and feel UI,
> or
> >> for example: developing a kiosk UI.
> >>
> >> Id be pleased if anyone can hint/ share. Thanks.
> >> ________________________________________________________________
> >> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> >> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> >> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> >> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >>
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Shivan Kannan
> ★ uidude.com
> ★ uidude.wordpress.com
>twitter at uidude

7 Aug 2009 - 11:12am
Diana Wynne
2008

Partly this depends on the skills and composition of your team. Visual
design specs are part of the UI spec, but they tend to be created by
different people.

Is there an existing corporate styleguide with branding that documents
colors, type, etc? If so, reference it as part of the UI spec.

Of course typography isn't purely visual design, and shouldn't be
specced in isolation, without considering typical content. Otherwise
you can end up with bright orange type that looks great but distracts
from what's important on the page, or type that's too small for your
middle-aged finance users, or beautiful headings that aren't obviously
clickable.

And in answer to your final question about developing web
applications, the key is prototyping early so that you can iterate the
whole, rather than having four different people producing lengthy
documents on paper, each representing their part of the elephant.

The design deliverables (and team) needed for a corporate website are
very different from web apps or intranet tools or a kiosk.

Diana

On Thu, Aug 6, 2009 at 11:57 PM, shivan kannan<shivan.kannan at gmail.com> wrote:
> I understand creating the following different deliverable documents in
> order:
>
> 1. Creating user personas
> 2. Scenarios
> 3. High level use cases document
> 4. Requirements specifications document
> 5. Low-level use cases document
> 6. Design draft documents
> 7. Wireframes creation
> 8. Task flow diagrams
> 9. UI specification document
> 10. Help manual, user documents
>
> I would like to know where or which from the above includes the
> following documents/ document parts:
> 1. Typography specifications
> 2. Color palettes info
> 3. Iconography
>
> At least I know that I have not seen them in any UI specification
> documents so far.
>
> Few related questions:
> 1. These are deliverables by graphic designer, UI designer or
> UX practitioner?
> 2. Who will benefit from them? Who can possibly use them in an
> application development senario?
> 3. How important are they to include in a complex web based
> application that involve quite a bit of artistic look and feel UI, or
> for example: developing a kiosk UI.
>
> Id be pleased if anyone can hint/ share. Thanks.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

7 Aug 2009 - 8:08am
fabuloso
2008

i would say 7. Question though, what are you putting for 6. design
draft documents?

fabian

On Fri, Aug 7, 2009 at 2:57 AM, shivan kannan<shivan.kannan at gmail.com> wrote:
> I understand creating the following different deliverable documents in
> order:
>
> 1. Creating user personas
> 2. Scenarios
> 3. High level use cases document
> 4. Requirements specifications document
> 5. Low-level use cases document
> 6. Design draft documents
> 7. Wireframes creation
> 8. Task flow diagrams
> 9. UI specification document
> 10. Help manual, user documents
>
> I would like to know where or which from the above includes the
> following documents/ document parts:
> 1. Typography specifications
> 2. Color palettes info
> 3. Iconography
>
> At least I know that I have not seen them in any UI specification
> documents so far.
>
> Few related questions:
> 1. These are deliverables by graphic designer, UI designer or
> UX practitioner?
> 2. Who will benefit from them? Who can possibly use them in an
> application development senario?
> 3. How important are they to include in a complex web based
> application that involve quite a bit of artistic look and feel UI, or
> for example: developing a kiosk UI.
>
> Id be pleased if anyone can hint/ share. Thanks.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

10 Aug 2009 - 6:52am
rohitkulthia
2009

Agree to Diana. Though i've made more then 12 apps UI design (iPhone)
along with their ACS (application conceptualization services), I never
came across Typo , Icons or Color palettes so no need for them..
The UI expert wireframes it for the graphic designer to design,then
the graphic designer incorporates them in a ppt. The rest complete
documentation is done by the PM.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=44422

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