Q: Persistent header bar from FB and LinkedIn

30 Jul 2009 - 9:54am
4 years ago
10 replies
1436 reads
kimbieler
2007

I've noticed that if you click on an external link in Facebook or LinkedIn
(and other sites) it sometimes loads the new site in a frame below a header
bar that's branded for the originating site.

What I'm wondering is:

1. Is there a name for this technique?
2. How are they usually coded?
3. How do people feel about these headers? Are they helpful or intrusive?

Thanks (and apologies for my ignorance),

Kim

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Apt Media Inc.
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Comments

30 Jul 2009 - 10:42am
Joshua Porter
2007

On Jul 30, 2009, at 10:54 AM, Kim Bieler wrote:

> I've noticed that if you click on an external link in Facebook or
> LinkedIn
> (and other sites) it sometimes loads the new site in a frame below a
> header
> bar that's branded for the originating site.
>
> What I'm wondering is:
>
> 1. Is there a name for this technique?
> 2. How are they usually coded?
> 3. How do people feel about these headers? Are they helpful or
> intrusive?

Services like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Digg love them because they get
all that data to feed their advertising bellies.

Site owners dislike them because the traffic is screened off, you
can't tell what's going on. Jeremy Keith shared some javascript site
owners can use to to remove them.

if (window.top !== window.self)
window.top.location.replace(window.self);

Hard-core users sometimes like them because they can use the service
more efficiently (e.g. hardcore Digg users)

Most other users don't like them because they take up screen real
estate and are annoying. (Frames usually suck)

In short, these "framebars" are a classic feature created with owner
value (not user value) in mind.

Josh

30 Jul 2009 - 10:45am
MediaMetrics India
2009

hi,

I dont know what FB or Linked In uses. But generally you can bring
other site inside your own website using "IFRAME". you can test it
yourself. Its a very simple technique.

Syntax is given below.

Your browser does not support iframes.

Or you can try in the w3school.org site in the link given below..

http://www.w3schools.com/TAGS/tag_iframe.asp

These are generally used for using details of master corporate into n
number of websites, e.g Template monster give their template details
as feed (iframe) so that other template selling websites who are
their affiliates can link using iframe. It will look as if the
affiliate company is selling, but actually the sale and operations at
backend would happen from Template monsters website.

This is generally used where user cannot distuingush and identify the
source.

Thanks

Sathish Sampath
www.sathishsampath.com
www.mediametrics.co.in

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30 Jul 2009 - 11:27am
Yohan Creemers
2008

There are some user centered applications of iframes.

For example image search:
http://images.google.com/
http://www.bing.com/?scope=images

Or this cute chat application, where you visit websites together with
the buddies you're chatting with:
http://quek.nl/

(Quek is in Dutch, but it's childishly easy to use: fill in a screen
name and hit Quek. Then click on the globe icon and type in a url).

- Yohan

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31 Jul 2009 - 6:14am
Sam Murray-Sutton
2009

Intrusive and unnecessary.

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31 Jul 2009 - 8:34am
jaketrimble
2008

Josh is spot on. One of the most important reasons I think FB uses the
frames is to reduce "bounce rate" and increase visitor loyalty. This
is an old technique that has been used since...I would say the "very
beginning".

The code could look like anything (javascript most likely, but I've
done it in C#, VB and JS). The page itself examines the url from the
query string parameter that was passed to it from another page (i.e.
you wall) and then it sets the bottom iframe's url to that
parameter. Obviously this is the simplest example.

-Jake

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31 Jul 2009 - 9:39am
jpb
2009

>
> 3. How do people feel about these headers? Are they helpful or intrusive?

Some people feel VERY strongly that this technique fundamentally rots the
web by introducing new and bad URLs for content. There was a big row about
this technique this spring. Gruber led the charge, but its worth poking
around and seeing what other ppl had to say, there's a bit of
back-and-forth.

http://daringfireball.net/2009/04/how_to_block_the_diggbar

31 Jul 2009 - 10:01am
Bob Sampson
2008

Plus those bars could easily add script so when a user browses around,
the bar gets the new Url and sends it back to their HQ. I can see some
browser-habit spying in this kind of instance.

But like Joshua said, these have "the owner value (not user value)
in mind."

And I agree.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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31 Jul 2009 - 10:09am
Joe Lanman
2007

They are utterly terrible - just one example: if a user comes to your site,
and then clicks to any other page - the address bar will not change. If they
attempt to link anyone to a page they have found on your site, the link will
a) display the wrong page (the original page) and b) include the header bar,
thus perpetuating the problem.

1 Aug 2009 - 4:06am
Sascha Brossmann
2008

On Thu, Jul 30, 2009 at 16:54, Kim Bieler<kimbieler at gmail.com> wrote:
> I've noticed that if you click on an external link in Facebook or LinkedIn
> (and other sites) it sometimes loads the new site in a frame below a header
> bar that's branded for the originating site.
>
> What I'm wondering is:
>
> 1. Is there a name for this technique?

Branding with a sledgehammer? ;->

> 2. How are they usually coded?
> 3. How do people feel about these headers? Are they helpful or intrusive?

Personally, I absolutely HATE HATE HATE it.

Cheers,

Sascha
--
&:create

10 Aug 2009 - 3:20pm
Matthew Turner
2009

Content creators hate it, too. Even more than users. Many feel very
strongly that it is a form of stealing content from their site. See
Josh's comment re: fat advertising bellies above. It is easy to see
why content producers hate it.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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