Biz models and design Shaun Inman's Fever

18 Jun 2009 - 11:15am
5 years ago
3 replies
377 reads
Vishal Subraman...
2005

> We as designers have a lot to contribute toward thinking through business
model implications.
Yes, we definitely do. But there are other people (mba types) who are
eventually responsible for the business models, not us. This distinction is
important because we've been fighting with the 'everyone can design' line of
thinking, haven't we? Just like the average mba can't design. the average
designer can't make money (broad generalization, of course).

Business models do affect User Experience, but this something that we need
to work with the business teams.

-Vishal

On Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 11:53 AM, Peter Merholz <peterme at peterme.com> wrote:

>
> On Jun 18, 2009, at 1:19 PM, Vishal Iyer wrote:
>
> Business model is most definitely *not* a part of design
>>
>
> Wow. This statement made me choke on my ale (I'm in London).
>
> Business model is definitely part of the customer experience, as Jeff Bezos
> so admirably pointed out:
> http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_09/b4121034637296.htm
> ""Internally, customer service is a component of customer experience," he
> says. "Customer experience includes having the lowest price, having the
> fastest delivery, having it reliable enough so that you don't need to
> contact [anyone]. Then you save customer service for those truly unusual
> situations. You know, I got my book and it's missing pages 47 through 58,"
> he says, breaking into a booming laugh."
>
> Business model is very much the success of iPod -- the chain of services
> that allow you to easily acquire music and get it on your player.
>
> Business model is the thing thwarting Tivo's success, no matter how
> brilliant it's user interface design.
>
> We as designers have a lot to contribute toward thinking through business
> model implications.
>
> --peter
>
>
>
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Comments

18 Jun 2009 - 11:37am
jrrogan
2005

This seems like a "nose VS face" destinction, with the Business model being
the face and design the nose, (I guess you could have a face without a nose,
but it wouldn't be that attractive ;).

Without a doubt, the Design/nose exists in the Business model/face, (unless
you're in Woody Allens Sleeper movie). Generally the face exudes more
influence then the nose by itself, for one the face includes the nose.

In reality they influence each other, hense Design is responsible for part
of the Business model, no?

Rich

On Thu, Jun 18, 2009 at 12:15 PM, Vishal Iyer <vishaliyer1 at gmail.com> wrote:

> > We as designers have a lot to contribute toward thinking through business
> model implications.
>

>
> Business models do affect User Experience, but this something that we need
> to work with the business teams.
>
> -Vishal
>
>
>
> --
> Joseph Rich Rogan
> President UX/UI Inc.
> http://www.jrrogan.com
>

18 Jun 2009 - 4:28pm
Steve Baty
2009

I'm going to just agree with Peter (and Todd's early statement). The
business model is a fundamental component that is difficult to separate out.
It can be, but you start to really fragment the design of your offering.

I think Andrei was simply asking us to look beyond the business model -
which he recognised contained some contentious choices - to the parts of the
software design that are most central to the discussions generally
undertaken on this list and the work of the people on it.

The business model is not the exclusive domain of "MBA types" - and there's
a stereotype that needs quashing - but an integrated consideration for the
entire design process.

Steve

2009/6/19 Peter Merholz <peterme at peterme.com>

>
> On Jun 18, 2009, at 1:19 PM, Vishal Iyer wrote:
>
> Business model is most definitely *not* a part of design
>>
>
> Wow. This statement made me choke on my ale (I'm in London).
>
> Business model is definitely part of the customer experience, as Jeff Bezos
> so admirably pointed out:
> http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_09/b4121034637296.htm
> ""Internally, customer service is a component of customer experience," he
> says. "Customer experience includes having the lowest price, having the
> fastest delivery, having it reliable enough so that you don't need to
> contact [anyone]. Then you save customer service for those truly unusual
> situations. You know, I got my book and it's missing pages 47 through 58,"
> he says, breaking into a booming laugh."
>
> Business model is very much the success of iPod -- the chain of services
> that allow you to easily acquire music and get it on your player.
>
> Business model is the thing thwarting Tivo's success, no matter how
> brilliant it's user interface design.
>
> We as designers have a lot to contribute toward thinking through business
> model implications.
>
> --peter
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Steve 'Doc' Baty | Principal | Meld Consulting | P: +61 417 061 292 | E:
stevebaty at meld.com.au | Twitter: docbaty | Skype: steve_baty | LinkedIn:
www.linkedin.com/in/stevebaty

Director, IxDA - ixda.org
Editor: Johnny Holland - johnnyholland.org
Contributor: UXMatters - www.uxmatters.com
UX Australia: 26-28 August, http://uxaustralia.com.au
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Blog: http://meld.com.au/blog

19 Jun 2009 - 9:47am
jrrogan
2005

I think the most interesting aspect of this thread, (and other children
threads), is summerized in Steve's statement:

"The business model is not the exclusive domain of "MBA types" - and there's
a stereotype that needs quashing - but an integrated consideration for the
entire design process. Steve"

The above statement is not a truism, rather I think it is a goal, (one I
feel very strongly about).

If you're working on design for a product that will be used for more then
"Art", then not "integrating/affecting/driving/controling" the business
model, in some meaningful way, tends to relegate design to a trivial and
inconsequential level.

Rich

--
Joseph Rich Rogan
President UX/UI Inc.
http://www.jrrogan.com

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