Arrival time in a form

4 Jun 2009 - 3:36am
2 years ago
8 replies
747 reads
Pietro Desiato
2008

I was reflecting on the best way to indicate the arrival time in a
form when you are reserving a room and want to communicate it.

At the moment, I have spotted two main designs:

1. A dropdown list with hour value from 00 to 24

2. Two dropdown lists: the first with 1 to 12 values and the second
with am\pm values

In the first case users would have a longer list, in the second two
interactions would be needed (one, if the default value of the second
dropdown is the most used...)

Do you have any best practice \ reccommendations about this?

thanks

Comments

19 Nov 2011 - 4:54pm
Josh Coe
2009

[redacted]

4 Jun 2009 - 7:22am
Nitesh Bhatia
2009

The best way would be to show
-morning
-day
-evening
-night

as options in drop down / radio button.

Then next drop down will contain the related hour list, say for morning you can show only from 6AM to 11AM. In this way you can decrease the number of entries in drop down and also increase usability.

19 Nov 2011 - 4:57pm
Josh Coe
2009

[redacted]

6 Jun 2009 - 2:18am
Pietro Desiato
2008

I think the idea of having more conversational labels is useful when
it does not make things even more complex. In this case, user kind of
knows at what time she will arrive or wants to communicate a defined
value at least (since the field is not mandatory). And, as Josh
points out, it could take even more clicks :)

sliders are fine but too advanced as interaction in my opinion (I
have a pretty wide and various audience) and I would not risk that
after some focused test sessions. Moreover, sliders tend to be not so
discrete as dropdown lists are: there is more room for errors and you
can't see what you are selecting.

I am focusing on the double dropdown list because having just one
dropdown menu would even force the user to scroll the page: since it
is positioned quite at the bottom of the page, I can imagine people
filling the form and not scrolling the elements quite enough...

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=42582

19 Nov 2011 - 4:57pm
Josh Coe
2009

[redacted]

7 Jun 2009 - 3:27pm
Pietro Desiato
2008

mmm I wonder how much screen space would be needed for your
design...probably too much for a task that is not the main...but i
like the idea of connecting icons with time ;)

scrollable dropdown lists? I usually tend to avoid double scrollbars,
especially if you have to scroll the page first. It could be annoying,
don't you think?

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=42582

7 Jun 2009 - 8:59pm
DampeS8N
2008

Who arrives on time anyway? Why not just have general choices like
Nitesh Bhatia said, then skip the more exact time. Most people will
arrive around those times away. Are you really gaining anything by
being so specific?

This is of course meaningless if exact times are important. IE. If
this interface is for the clerk at the Hotel, and not the person
making the reservation. Or if this is reservations for a fine
restaurant, where people will be there on time or lose their spot.

Context is important.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=42582

8 Jun 2009 - 10:47am
Sarah Kampman
2008

Most of us know how to enter time without typos; the only tricky part is
dealing with times between 0:00 and 12:59 that are unmarked with am/pm.
So it seems like the simplest approach would be a text-entry box with
decent validation and a hint (e.g., "You can enter time like 2:30pm or
14:30").

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