You decide - More browser buttons

5 Jan 2005 - 1:33am
9 years ago
7 replies
589 reads
Suresh JV
2004

IMHO, if the user is presented with a big red button for HOME, he will
definitely use it, irrespective of whether the Web site or web app has
a good/bad design. The point for the user would be to simply follow the
Fitt's Law.

I've been using Google toolbar's "Up One Level" button since last one year
on almost all the websites I visit including web apps. And its been an
invaluable shortcut for me. [I never observe/search if the site has a
Home link]

That said, I dont see any thing wrong in giving some more COMMONLY used
[not 100] buttons on the Browser bar. Anyways there is plenty of space.

Regards,
Suresh JV.

[Please voluntarily trim replies to include only relevant quoted material.]

> however, used sites where I couldn't easily link back to a home page.
> If my browser provided me the option to get around poor design (which
> abounds) that would be great.

> Marcin Wichary:
> I'm not the one who's making these up. But I also want dedicated
> buttons for
>
> Sitemap
> Terms of use
> Webmaster's phone number
> Corporate org chart
> Branch offices

Just wanted to point out that both Opera and Mozilla (NOT Firefox)
already had this feature at some point. Probably still have. They used
the information provided explicitly by webmasters in the <link> tags.
Opera 7 had separate buttons for: Home, Index, Contents, Search,
Glossary, Help, First, Previous, Next, Last, Up, Copyright and Author.
Both called it (Site) Navigation Bar.

Comments

5 Jan 2005 - 2:09am
Listera
2004

Suresh J V:

> Anyways there is plenty of space.

Where?

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

5 Jan 2005 - 2:38am
Suresh JV
2004

Suresh J V:
> Anyways there is plenty of space.

Ziya:
> Where?

On browser Button Bar. Considering the default buttons only with selective
text on the right.

5 Jan 2005 - 2:37am
Stewart Dean
2004

I read the original Alert box and have to admit I think Jakob has got many
things wrong, from multiple styles of links to the idea that multiple
windows is a good thing. Both of these are anti-usability as far as I am
concerned.

I also consider the whole more buttons thing to be going in the wrong
direction. The reason is a browser should provide the framework for what is
essential a simple navigation style. There was one list provided by Marcin
that demonstrates one set of buttons:

> > Sitemap
> > Terms of use
> > Webmaster's phone number
> > Corporate org chart
> > Branch offices

Not sure if this was 100% serious but whilst the first two are consistent in
nearly all sites I've created the other three are of no relevence. Instead
'contact us' is always listed in what I call 'overall' navigation.

That's essentialy what these buttons would look to replicate - the links
that appear at the bottom or top right of the average website. Even 'terms
of use' is an incorrect term as it's more oftern refered to as 'terms and
conditions' and then usual broken down into privacy, legal and
accessability. Some sites even have a help button, and of course there is
always search and the home link for the site.

In my view these are becoming increasingly standard in the design of a site
and whilst there is inconsistency replicating these in a browser is just
going to add to the inconsistancy (it will be different in different
browsers and users will or will not have certain buttons). The web browser
works because of it's apparant simplicity. Many have tried to tweak it but
fundamentally all the buttons beyond back , forward, stop, reload and home
are non standard and redundant.

I do agree with his point that external links should somehow be different to
internal links - but then a different link style will be less effective then
correct page design with external links clearly marked. I think Jakob and
others are falling into the 'more funtionality = better' trap Microsoft fall
into each and every time. It's why Google won the search battle rather than
Yahoo and MSN search won't be a contender.

Stewart Dean
User Experience Person

5 Jan 2005 - 10:07am
Alain D. M. G. ...
2003

--- Listera <listera at rcn.com> a écrit :

> Suresh J V:
> > Anyways there is plenty of space.
>
> Where?
>

Don't you remember? Nielsen has this HUGE screen, set at max pixel
size which means that any tool bar up there is incredibly wider than
normal and has more space for buttons. And he says screens are going
to be HUGER still very soon now, which means even more space for
buttons. He expects, of course that most users will set their screens
at the 3200 by 2400 pixel resolution possible (or more) instead of 800
by 600.

Looks like a hardware solution to me. Like saying that all those
graphic designers won't have to worry their pretty little heads by
graphic design problems because Mr Electrical Engineer is going to
settle everything.

Alain Vaillancourt

__________________________________________________________
Lèche-vitrine ou lèche-écran ?
magasinage.yahoo.ca

5 Jan 2005 - 10:13am
Listera
2004

Alain D. M. G. Vaillancourt:

> Nielsen has this HUGE screen, set at max pixel size which means that any tool
> bar up there is incredibly wider than normal and has more space for buttons.

I want to be a "Usability Professional" when I grow up.

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

8 Jan 2005 - 3:03am
Stephen Mallett
2004

Alain Vaillancourt stated that Nielsen was waiting for the world to move to
a large screen. I have to to agrree that this may not be the best thing to
wait for.

Nielsen quoted that the size of a Broasdsheet newspaper, Which if Nielsen
spent a lot time in the UK then he would see the demise of the Broadsheet
newspapers. Compact portable versions of the Times / Independent outnumber
the boradsheet print runs.

Another trend we have seen is the use of "small" displays on various other
devices which will never be able to have Broadsheet size screen on my
mobile phone!

I appreciate that differnt displays have different constraints. I am in the
minority thatI have never designed a web site in life but many of the real
time control systems I work on attempt to mirror the mental model of web
sites. So I can implement some really poor designs to my limited but
captured users!

8 Jan 2005 - 3:59am
Manu Sharma
2003

> Alain Vaillancourt stated that Nielsen was waiting for the world to
move to
> a large screen. I have to to agrree that this may not be the best
thing to
> wait for.

Talking of large displays...did anyone else notice large [23"?]
displays all around the Googleplex in the 60 Minutes interview? There
were also many dual-screen and in one case, a triple-sceen display!!

That's all the convincing I need. :-)

A video of the 60 Minutes Google episode is available on this page
http://tinyurl.com/69gb7

Manu.
http://orangehues.com/blog

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