Specific kind of faceted search example?

8 May 2009 - 1:36am
5 years ago
7 replies
1641 reads
Adam Korman
2004

It's hard to tell without the specifics, but this might be similar to
your challenge: http://www.tigerdirect.com. A good example of how they
deal with filters is to go down the path of browsing for hard drives.
You can keep adding filters by clicking on items in the left rail/
navigation area. As you get deeper in, they start to construct a
breadcrumb trail of filters you've added. I wouldn't say it's a great
experience, but they've made an attempt at handling some of the things
it sounds like you are dealing with. I'm not sure how clear it is to
people, but they are doing some useful things.

-Adam

On May 7, 2009, at 11:46 PM, Johan Sjöstrand wrote:

> Hello.
>
> We're currently designing a faceted search / guided search with some
> very specific challanges:
>
> [snip]
>
> We're currently thinking you need to make one big pick. Structure
> the filters on at least two levels so they're not all on the same.
> That would make things much easier. But we are still open to the
> suggested design until proven otherwise.
>
> Have anyone of you seen an example of what is described here? I know
> I haven't..

Comments

8 May 2009 - 1:55am
Anonymous

Thanks!

The more I think about the more I believe a flat structure is very
difficult to manage. Both in technical terms and in the mental model
of the user.

In your example, you pick hard drives and then you go on with those
specific filters. What is proposed in our project is to manage the
whole "computer parts" category as one with filters.

Another example would be to try and manage "Hifi" as one category with
speakers, tvs, receivers etc. All of which have their own specific
qualities. Even TVs would be hard to manage with just one category
with filters. There are some big differences between LCD, Plasma and
CRT models too..

Still interested to see if this would be possible or even good, but I
highly doubt that it is the right way to go.

/Johan

On May 8, 2009, at 9:36 AM, Adam Korman wrote:

> It's hard to tell without the specifics, but this might be similar
> to your challenge: http://www.tigerdirect.com. A good example of how
> they deal with filters is to go down the path of browsing for hard
> drives. You can keep adding filters by clicking on items in the left
> rail/navigation area. As you get deeper in, they start to construct
> a breadcrumb trail of filters you've added. I wouldn't say it's a
> great experience, but they've made an attempt at handling some of
> the things it sounds like you are dealing with. I'm not sure how
> clear it is to people, but they are doing some useful things.
>
> -Adam
>
>
> On May 7, 2009, at 11:46 PM, Johan Sjöstrand wrote:
>
>> Hello.
>>
>> We're currently designing a faceted search / guided search with
>> some very specific challanges:
>>
>> [snip]
>>
>> We're currently thinking you need to make one big pick. Structure
>> the filters on at least two levels so they're not all on the same.
>> That would make things much easier. But we are still open to the
>> suggested design until proven otherwise.
>>
>> Have anyone of you seen an example of what is described here? I
>> know I haven't..
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8 May 2009 - 6:26am
Gavin Burke
2008

Its also good to maybe have a look at peoples buying habits. For
electronic consumer goods, I think people use brands as a way of
choosing a product or 3rd party review site.
When I was looking a while back found my process was to check review
sites and then go to an online camera store with one or two models in
mind. Could never remember the exact model number and even if I could
there are so many different way to write X-123B-Z that search always
missed it, but I do remember what it looked like, RRP and the brand.
So making it easy to choose by the common real world process people
use when picking a product might help.

Found this site the best site so far for finding what I wanted and I
checked alot of them.
http://www.pixmania.ie/ie/uk/cameras/digital-camera/1/1/categorie.html

On 8 May 2009, at 08:36, Adam Korman wrote:

> It's hard to tell without the specifics, but this might be similar
> to your challenge: http://www.tigerdirect.com. A good example of how
> they deal with filters is to go down the path of browsing for hard
> drives. You can keep adding filters by clicking on items in the left
> rail/navigation area. As you get deeper in, they start to construct
> a breadcrumb trail of filters you've added. I wouldn't say it's a
> great experience, but they've made an attempt at handling some of
> the things it sounds like you are dealing with. I'm not sure how
> clear it is to people, but they are doing some useful things.
>
> -Adam
>
>

8 May 2009 - 2:49pm
Brian Mila
2009

gettyimages.com has an advanced search that is similar to a faceted
search. The filters can be combined and turned on and off via
checkboxes. It works for them because their user's are domain
knowledgeable. I don't know if it would work so well for a general
e-commerce site though. CNET has a more user-friendly faceted search
which supports some of the options you mention. Once you drill down
far enough the filters are displayed in a row and you can click the
"X" to get rid of a particular filter.

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9 May 2009 - 6:23am
Anonymous

Take a look at CareerBuilder.com. Once you submit a search you can
filter on a number of categories.

Even better is BestBuy.com.
(http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?id=abcat0101000&type=category)
After you select a department, Televisions for example, you can filter
on 'Types of Televisions', 'Top Rated', 'Screen Size', 'Price
Range' & 'Brand'. I know BestBuy utilizes FAST Search.

I would also suggest taking a look at the advanced filtering
Recommind allows. Not suggesting you need to buy the product, but
they have a real nice interface for exposing very complex faceted
searches.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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20 May 2009 - 3:21am
Sebastian Prost
2009

I personally like www.geizhals.at (kind of Bestbuy in Austria)
You have to select a category and one or two subcategories first (let's say Systems -> CPUs -> Intel Xeon) and then you can filter by turning product specific filters on and off. You are also allowed to combine filters (like I want to see quad-core and dual-core processors)
The only disadvantage of the site are the missing pictures in the list view.
Direct link to the cpu-example: http://geizhals.at/?cat=cpuppro
It's in German, but you should find your way.

11 May 2009 - 12:12pm
Paul McInerney
2009

I'd agree that bestbuy.com and cnet.com are good designs to examine.

Regarding Johan's need for hierarchical/parent filters, one approach is to show a hierarchical list (possibly in a drop down list). For example, see bestbuy.ca (not .com); from the TV&Video menu, you can directly select "21" - 29" LCD TVs", which specifies values for two facets within a subcategory. BTW - Unlike bestbuy.com, bestbuy.ca does not otherwise support faceted browsing in the usual sense.

Regarding Johan's need to present many options, the "See all..." option often works well. As well, don't forget the facet of last resort - the facet labeled "Other". See cnet.com for examples.

2 Jun 2009 - 12:43pm
melanie burke
2009

I'm attempting to draw a structure diagram/site map to represent the
categories within a faceted navigation.

I'm struggling as I am trying to represent something three
dimensional within a two dimensional environment (i.e. the paper).
Has anyone seen this done effectively and can point me in the
direction of examples?

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