Feedback on Redesigned BART Ticket Kiosk Interface

6 May 2009 - 1:08am
5 years ago
30 replies
1496 reads
ljuba
2009

I just finished my final UI design project at UC Berkeley's School of
Information (I'm a grad student there) and was hoping for your
feedback.

We redesigned the BART ticket kiosk.

Our goal was to make it easier for first-time or infrequent riders to
use while not making it any harder for experienced riders. The
software was built in Adobe Flex; the physical prototype was built
around a laptop and controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.

www.bartkiosk.com

Please check it out and let me know what you think.

Comments

6 May 2009 - 5:53am
pyces
2007

Great job! I did expect a touch screen, where I could click the actual
stop name or colored region, rather than a physical button, and
similarly, that I could click the stop names once I had chosen a region,
such as 19th St Oakland. This mental model expectation was created by
being able to interact with the dialog box via touch and of course,
interacting with newer ATMs. Since I don't live in an urban area that
provides that type of infrastructure, I wasn't used to the buttons and
letters corresponding to the soft keys (I dislike soft keys anyway,
especially in my cell phone). I did wonder why there are corresponding
letters when the letters don't provide any value or help to make things
more understandable. If I clicked yellow, it shouldn't matter that that
color corresponds to E. However, this might be a limitation of the
current physical design of the kiosk which might not have been within
the scope of your project. I liked how you made use of the limitations
of the physical buttons to enable the display of MORE choices. If the
buttons/letters aren't physical limitations, then it seems that clicking
the actual stop name, rather than the button that is placed rather far
from it.
One idea (this is all fresh in my mind since I'm currently researching
ATM redesign for my company): Fifth Third (53.com) bank's ATM makes the
soft keys look like large buttons with a little arrow pointing towards
the physical button, which seemed to integrate the software and hardware
more, making it seem like the software interface design was deliberate
rather than showing that it was constrained to the limitations of the
physical design. But it does look like the blue arrows pointing into the
screen rather than away at the buttons are part of the kiosk's physical
constraints, so this kind of modification may not even be possible.

Courtney

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
Ljuba Miljkovic
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2009 8:08 PM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Feedback on Redesigned BART Ticket Kiosk
Interface

I just finished my final UI design project at UC Berkeley's School of
Information (I'm a grad student there) and was hoping for your
feedback.

We redesigned the BART ticket kiosk.

Our goal was to make it easier for first-time or infrequent riders to
use while not making it any harder for experienced riders. The
software was built in Adobe Flex; the physical prototype was built
around a laptop and controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.

www.bartkiosk.com

Please check it out and let me know what you think.

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

6 May 2009 - 7:25am
Anonymous

The interface looks nice and I think the letters near the regions is
really handy. Makes it easier to distinct which section belongs to
which button then the apparently coloured lines.

Weyert de Boer (wdb at innerfuse.biz)
innerfuse*

http://www.innerfuse.biz

6 May 2009 - 7:22am
gMulder
2009

Looks good. I had trouble with the "Select a Destination" screen -
at a quick look (the one I would have using a kiosk - in a noisy
place and me being nervous about the thing) I was confused by the
colour/placing of the buttons and it took me a while to figure out
that the colours are the things to go for. I had expected a spatial
link between the buttons and the areas - maybe the colour-link needs
to be strengthened.
Also I did not understand what Large Value Tickets are - some
information about that would probably help visitors or infrequent
users.

Cheers
Günther

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=41790

6 May 2009 - 8:20am
Dan Harrelson
2007

Nice work! I like that it gets you to a ticket value that's exactly
what you need for a trip. That's probably the biggest improvement.

The hardest screen for me to understand was the system map. It took a
bit to realize that the hard keys were mapped to colors which mapped
to regions of the map. Did you think about just painting the hard
keys the map colors? I wonder if that would help and doubt that
having colored keys during the rest of the experience would degrade
comprehension.

I'd also wager that BART knows how much extra $$ it collects each
year forcing passengers to over-fill a ticket, and would resist a
move to this specific value ticketing.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=41790

6 May 2009 - 8:23am
Anonymous

I think it's better to improve the interface without too much
dependency on the colours themselves but more the contrast. The only
clear colours on the "Select a Destination Region" screen are B and F.
The other colours appears to be the same colour A and B are yellow and
C and F are Blue also I am not sure why the colours yellow, blue,
greenish and gray is being used. Why gray for G?

Weyert de Boer (wdb at innerfuse.biz)
innerfuse*

http://www.innerfuse.biz

6 May 2009 - 8:36am
Nina Eleanor Alter
2009

I expected a touch-screen, too.

Part of that I'm speculatively thinking, was the fields of color for
each region.
The letters defining each region that map to the buttons, also got
lost with the map.

Maybe give the letterforms a flat-background to help them pop from the
background, without looking clickable but giving them more emphasis?

Go Arduino, go!

:) nina

On May 6, 2009, at 4:53 AM, Jordan, Courtney wrote:

> Great job! I did expect a touch screen, where I could click the actual
> stop name or colored region, rather than a physical button, and
> similarly, that I could click the stop names once I had chosen a
> region,
> such as 19th St Oakland. This mental model expectation was created by
> being able to interact with the dialog box via touch and of course,
> interacting with newer ATMs. Since I don't live in an urban area that
> provides that type of infrastructure, I wasn't used to the buttons and
> letters corresponding to the soft keys (I dislike soft keys anyway,
> especially in my cell phone). I did wonder why there are corresponding
> letters when the letters don't provide any value or help to make
> things
> more understandable. If I clicked yellow, it shouldn't matter that
> that
> color corresponds to E. However, this might be a limitation of the
> current physical design of the kiosk which might not have been within
> the scope of your project. I liked how you made use of the limitations
> of the physical buttons to enable the display of MORE choices. If the
> buttons/letters aren't physical limitations, then it seems that
> clicking
> the actual stop name, rather than the button that is placed rather far
> from it.
> One idea (this is all fresh in my mind since I'm currently researching
> ATM redesign for my company): Fifth Third (53.com) bank's ATM makes
> the
> soft keys look like large buttons with a little arrow pointing towards
> the physical button, which seemed to integrate the software and
> hardware
> more, making it seem like the software interface design was deliberate
> rather than showing that it was constrained to the limitations of the
> physical design. But it does look like the blue arrows pointing into
> the
> screen rather than away at the buttons are part of the kiosk's
> physical
> constraints, so this kind of modification may not even be possible.
>
> Courtney
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
> Ljuba Miljkovic
> Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2009 8:08 PM
> To: discuss at ixda.org
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Feedback on Redesigned BART Ticket Kiosk
> Interface
>
> I just finished my final UI design project at UC Berkeley's School of
> Information (I'm a grad student there) and was hoping for your
> feedback.
>
> We redesigned the BART ticket kiosk.
>
> Our goal was to make it easier for first-time or infrequent riders to
> use while not making it any harder for experienced riders. The
> software was built in Adobe Flex; the physical prototype was built
> around a laptop and controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.
>
> www.bartkiosk.com
>
> Please check it out and let me know what you think.
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

6 May 2009 - 8:53am
pyces
2007

Good catch! The colors do not take into account red-green or blue-yellow
(rarer) color-blind users.
A is orange
B is green
C is blue
No D
E is yellow
F is purple
G is pink

If you're going to use colors to convey information, you need to convey
the information in another manner as well for color-blind users. That's
why a touch screen would be more effective here. But now I see that the
letters which are always present actually map to the letters within the
map. I didn't catch that the first time around, I just mapped the
section color to the color button, so for a new user, especially a
color-blind user, this might require some trial and error.

Courtney

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
Weyert de Boer
Sent: Wednesday, May 06, 2009 10:24 AM
To: IXDA list
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] Feedback on Redesigned BART Ticket Kiosk
Interface

I think it's better to improve the interface without too much
dependency on the colours themselves but more the contrast. The only
clear colours on the "Select a Destination Region" screen are B and F.
The other colours appears to be the same colour A and B are yellow and
C and F are Blue also I am not sure why the colours yellow, blue,
greenish and gray is being used. Why gray for G?

Weyert de Boer (wdb at innerfuse.biz)
innerfuse*

http://www.innerfuse.biz

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

6 May 2009 - 8:57am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

Certainly, a touchscreen would make things easier, but they were
obviously designing within the constraints of the existing hardware.
Given that, I think they've done a fine job.

Best,
Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Senior Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

The public is more familiar with
bad design than good design.
It is, in effect, conditioned
to prefer bad design, because
that is what it lives with.
The new becomes threatening,
the old reassuring.

- Paul Rand

6 May 2009 - 10:09am
Sharon Greenfield5
2008

A couple of thoughts:

The kiosk doesnt know where I am? It makes me choose a starting point?
I mean, yes it's important to give the option to change the starting
point, but for the most of percentage of sales the user will be buying
a ticket from the starting point they are standing at.

Also, as a tourist in the bay area, it would be helpful for me if the
kiosk would identify itself - I often dont know know the name of the
station where I am when I walk up. So have the kiosk software look for
a kiosk hardware indicator which then can be insert into the code so
the software knows where it is.

I love the buttons.

For a second there I was clicking on the map with my mouse, trying to
engage a location until I recognised the letter correlation with the
buttons. In this day and age of iphone touchscreens, it sure would be
cool to touch the location on screen. however, that technology might
not be...cost effective, given that the stations are inevitebly going
to be vandalized.

On May 6, 2009, at 12:08 AM, Ljuba Miljkovic wrote:
>
> We redesigned the BART ticket kiosk.
>
> Our goal was to make it easier for first-time or infrequent riders to
> use while not making it any harder for experienced riders. The
> software was built in Adobe Flex; the physical prototype was built
> around a laptop and controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.
>
> www.bartkiosk.com
>
> Please check it out and let me know what you think.
>

6 May 2009 - 10:56am
Peter Merholz
2004

Like others, the destination screen was not immediately clear.

I didn't *get* that the large floaty letters next to the system map
were meant to map to the buttons. Also, it takes quite a bit of effort
to discern which destinations are aligned with which floaty letters.

I would do two things:
- I would make the floaty letters look more like the ATM-style
buttons, so that there's a clear connection between the floaty letters
and the buttons on the sides of the screen
- I would draw a bounding box to reinforce which destinations are
selected to which floaty letters

--peter

On May 6, 2009, at 12:08 AM, Ljuba Miljkovic wrote:

> I just finished my final UI design project at UC Berkeley's School of
> Information (I'm a grad student there) and was hoping for your
> feedback.
>
> We redesigned the BART ticket kiosk.
>
> Our goal was to make it easier for first-time or infrequent riders to
> use while not making it any harder for experienced riders. The
> software was built in Adobe Flex; the physical prototype was built
> around a laptop and controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.
>
> www.bartkiosk.com
>
> Please check it out and let me know what you think.
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

6 May 2009 - 11:19am
Jack L. Moffett
2005

On May 6, 2009, at 12:09 PM, live wrote:

> The kiosk doesnt know where I am? It makes me choose a starting point?

It's fairly obvious that was just a setting for the prototype, as it
darkens the entire mockup, including the physical buttons, and would
require a touchscreen.

Best,
Jack

Jack L. Moffett
Senior Interaction Designer
inmedius
412.459.0310 x219
http://www.inmedius.com

First, recognize that the ‘right’ requirements
are in principle unknowable by users, customers
and designers at the start.

Devise the design process, and the formal
agreement between designers and customers and users,
to be sensitive to what is learnt by any of the
parties as the design evolves.

- J.C. Jones

6 May 2009 - 11:34am
ljuba
2009

Thank you all for your feedback!

A few thoughts:

I completely agree that clicking/touching the screen is tempting when
it's presented to you in a browser. Though in our user testing at a
BART station with the physical prototype, it wasn't a problem at
all. Users immediately went for the physical buttons.

Ben and I knew going in that the map screen was going to be the
biggest challenge. We tried to solidify the connection between the
regions and the buttons by using the same typeface on-screen as on
the physical buttons. Also, the colors have been carefully chosen to
be as distinguishable as I could make them, while not overlapping
with the red and light blue of the "start over" and "a-z listing"
below.

I've particularly appreciated the feedback from folks who live
outside the Bay Area. The goal of this project was to make the kiosks
easier for visitors and infrequent riders so your input is especially
valuable. Thank you very much!

Cheers,
Ljuba

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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6 May 2009 - 12:26pm
Angel Marquez
2008

Looks good.

In the future would we be able to do this:

Would you make it so I can press a button on my handy mobile cellular
device & the kiosk says "Thank you mister marquez for choosing Bart
and helping your environment. You have X amount of rides left. Feel
free to reload your credits on your handheld device during your
journey" in whatever language I prefer? Of course an attractive female
avatar with a tuned voice hinting I should reload during my journey
and have that channel ready for my commuting thoughts to be
capitalized on when I do login to reload. Maybe even have it like a
casino slot machine where the random commuter hits the jackpot and
balloons fall from the ceilings and everyone celebrates the chance
winners good fortune.

Say hi to the Cloyne Court kids for me.

Sent from my iPhone

On May 6, 2009, at 12:08 AM, Ljuba Miljkovic
<ljuba.miljkovic at gmail.com> wrote:

> I just finished my final UI design project at UC Berkeley's School of
> Information (I'm a grad student there) and was hoping for your
> feedback.
>
> We redesigned the BART ticket kiosk.
>
> Our goal was to make it easier for first-time or infrequent riders to
> use while not making it any harder for experienced riders. The
> software was built in Adobe Flex; the physical prototype was built
> around a laptop and controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.
>
> www.bartkiosk.com
>
> Please check it out and let me know what you think.
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

6 May 2009 - 12:55pm
Dave Malouf
2005

My students and I got really confused by choosing the starting point.
I think you could of just told us in the text of the web page. It set
up a poor evaluation context.

Putting that aside, we got lost on the map. the color > Letter > soft
key mapping were not apparent w/o further direction and the breakdown
was arbitrary.

It might have been more appropriate to select a line. Most people who
use BART think of their stops based on the line they are using.

I think you got caught exposing the system model of the interface
(btw, I accepted the softkey UI approach as a constraint you were
working on) and you found a way to slice it all 5x5 so to speak.

When I went to the alpha list, I expected to see a breakdown of the
alphabet that allowed me to drill down deeper, as opposed to a
"horizontal scroll" through the entire list of stations.

The checkout system was for me the most successful piece, though I
think you need some work on the multiple ticket language and flow. I
got it, but I thought it needed better visual cues.

As an added value, it might be interesting once someone picks a
destination that the information at the top adds 2 pieces of info:
next train countdown & time to destination.

Good luck w/ it! And thanx for sharing!

--dave
-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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6 May 2009 - 1:18pm
Angel Marquez
2008

+ I wouldn't want a touchscreen in a public space like BART for obvious
reasons.

On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 11:26 AM, Angel Marquez <angel.marquez at gmail.com>wrote:

> Looks good.
>
> In the future would we be able to do this:
>
> Would you make it so I can press a button on my handy mobile cellular
> device & the kiosk says "Thank you mister marquez for choosing Bart
> and helping your environment. You have X amount of rides left. Feel
> free to reload your credits on your handheld device during your
> journey" in whatever language I prefer? Of course an attractive female
> avatar with a tuned voice hinting I should reload during my journey
> and have that channel ready for my commuting thoughts to be
> capitalized on when I do login to reload. Maybe even have it like a
> casino slot machine where the random commuter hits the jackpot and
> balloons fall from the ceilings and everyone celebrates the chance
> winners good fortune.
>
> Say hi to the Cloyne Court kids for me.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 6, 2009, at 12:08 AM, Ljuba Miljkovic
> <ljuba.miljkovic at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > I just finished my final UI design project at UC Berkeley's School of
> > Information (I'm a grad student there) and was hoping for your
> > feedback.
> >
> > We redesigned the BART ticket kiosk.
> >
> > Our goal was to make it easier for first-time or infrequent riders to
> > use while not making it any harder for experienced riders. The
> > software was built in Adobe Flex; the physical prototype was built
> > around a laptop and controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.
> >
> > www.bartkiosk.com
> >
> > Please check it out and let me know what you think.
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

6 May 2009 - 12:28pm
Anonymous

Sorry, to hear that you weren't able to make the colours more
distinguishable. Did you print out a colour palette on non-colour
printer? That's a good test to see if the colours work. You could try
to improve it or maybe make the connection of the region with the
letter/buttons more clear. Otherwise you could add some small sentence
which notifies the user about this connection.

6 May 2009 - 2:05pm
Anonymous

I was in the bay area 2 month ago. And I took the BART once.

I think if the kiosk I used was this one I could have buy tickets
without asking for help. So I will say good job !

A touch screen would make it more intuitive but I find it OK.

The first step (choosing the current location) should be optional
(the kiosk don't move and as someone told tourists don't know where
they are)

- As a tourist I don't understand the large-ticket value so I can't
say anything about that.
- It may be helpful to have translation in different languages for
foreign people.
- I don't know if this is something possible but selling "muni"
tickets in such kiosk may help tourists (I found SF transportation
network a little bit confusing)

If you're interested I can try to get some pictures of the kiosk in
Paris

Cheers,
Olivier

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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6 May 2009 - 4:22pm
contenthouse
2008

Hi,

I agree with Dave Malouf's comment about the Destination Map. I
think you should consider delineating using lines as oppose to
showing the birds eye map. The current station the rider is at should
also be marked on the destination map. I think globally it is an
accepted standard to organize around lines with outbound and inbound
end of the line destination names.

Did you also research the interactions between newbies and regular
riders of the system? I would guess that regular riders who are in a
rush to get to work would get very frustrated waiting behind newbies
who are orientating themselves with BART destination maps. Based on a
trip to Bangkok, Thailand, I used the Air Train system which has a
separate kiosk for destination map/ticket cost and also a kiosk for
purchasing a ticket. That way both types of riders are supported. I
applaud your ideas working within the constraints of the current BART
hardware. I think your design has exposed weakness in the BART system
relating to trip information and purchasing tickets.

I hope this helps, Peter

Ps I am a BART rider and the system gives me heartburn

UX Designer Wells Fargo

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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6 May 2009 - 5:00pm
Dave Malouf
2005

angel, why no touch screens. Being a NYC resident for over 15 years,
many of which w/ the current metrocard system from an IxD
perspective, I don't understand the comment. Is this about hygene?
really? considering how much stuff we touch in a subway system like
seats and hand rails and turnstyles having a touch screen is really
not significant to the additional spread of anything. AND in all the
time since the implementation of the Metrocard kiosks not once has
there been a story linking the spread of anything to the touch
screens.

Anyway, I don't understand why public = no touch? I mean ATM's use
touch? Fragility? again, we have seem plenty of models of touch
screens working in these conditions quite well.

color me confused!

-- dave

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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6 May 2009 - 6:02pm
Gavin Burke
2008

My usual use case for public transport is getting off the plane and
into a busy station. Nearly every ticket system on first use, bar
London and Tokyo, have ended up
with me at the head of a queue of locals rolling their eyes to heaven.
In these situations navigation to an end point as fast as possible
regardless of $1 discrepancies in the ticket fair is the most
important thing. I just keep hitting the forward/continue button until
a price and a place to pay appears.
Applying this use case to the Bart system, I would make sure that the
bottom two buttons are always prev/next page in the navigation towards
the end point of getting some form of a ticket and that they don't
switch modes at any stage.

>
>
>> I just finished my final UI design project at UC Berkeley's School of
>> Information (I'm a grad student there) and was hoping for your
>> feedback.
>>
>> We redesigned the BART ticket kiosk.
>>
>> Our goal was to make it easier for first-time or infrequent riders to
>> use while not making it any harder for experienced riders. The
>> software was built in Adobe Flex; the physical prototype was built
>> around a laptop and controlled by an Arduino micro-controller.
>>
>> www.bartkiosk.com
>>
>> Please check it out and let me know what you think.
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

6 May 2009 - 7:02pm
Christian Crumlish
2006

On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 12:18 PM, Angel Marquez <angel.marquez at gmail.com>wrote:

> + I wouldn't want a touchscreen in a public space like BART for obvious
> reasons.
>

What about the mechanical buttons on the current BART kiosk machines. Would
you touch them?

-x-

6 May 2009 - 7:07pm
Angel Marquez
2008

Yes, and I have; but, I'd rather not. ATM machines just the same. Seems like
the technology is in place to have my own touch point on my person set up
the way I like it and the receiver would just make the monetary exchange.
I over exaggerated my example to a status quo solution. I would be just fine
with being detected and let through without any sort of verbal exchange.

How much revenue potential you think the swine flu carried with it?

On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 6:02 PM, Christian Crumlish <xian at pobox.com> wrote:

>
>
> On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 12:18 PM, Angel Marquez <angel.marquez at gmail.com>wrote:
>
>> + I wouldn't want a touchscreen in a public space like BART for obvious
>> reasons.
>>
>
> What about the mechanical buttons on the current BART kiosk machines. Would
> you touch them?
>
> -x-
>
>
>

6 May 2009 - 10:12pm
Peter Merholz
2004

> What about the mechanical buttons on the current BART kiosk
> machines. Would
> you touch them?

I actually depress them with my tongue.

--peter

6 May 2009 - 10:15pm
Angel Marquez
2008

Zactly my point!

Sent from my iPhone

On May 6, 2009, at 9:12 PM, Peter Merholz <peterme at peterme.com> wrote:

>> What about the mechanical buttons on the current BART kiosk
>> machines. Would
>> you touch them?
>
> I actually depress them with my tongue.
>
> --peter
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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6 May 2009 - 10:41pm
Alan James Salmoni
2008

One thing that jumped out at me was when going from the overall map to
the map of a single line: I found the switch from lines going in
various directions onto a single line with a different pattern and
direction confusing - I felt myself having to reorientate and
translate between the two (line A shows this - it initially appears
as a single line going vertically but then goes horizontally when
selected). Not sure how to get around it outside of keeping the same
line pattern, and maybe an animated zooming transition from the
overall map to the line map might help to show users what they are
drilling down onto. It might help orientation but testing would show
if this is a significant user concern.

Also, when displayed horizontally, the direction was the opposite to
what I expected with the destination on the left rather than the
right. Users may differ in what they expect so testing awould be
useful here.

Maybe also some visual connection other than colour between the line
and its button for people with colour blindness (as mentioned by
others before sorry)

And as David M said, some information about changes would be nice
especially if printed out on the ticket itself, and expecting train
times / journey times are extremely handy. Or maybe an arrow "go
this way" to point users in the right direction once they've bought
the ticket? I'm not sure about that - how easy is it to get lost in
those stations? For the London underground, I find it was quite easy
and sometimes walked off in the wrong direction!

Other than that, I quite liked it esp the fade in after choosing a
start point.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=41790

6 May 2009 - 11:51pm
Sharon Greenfield5
2008

This has nothing to do with hygiene and everything to do with ROI.
Touchscreen vs simple screens in price are VERY different.

Currently simple screens get spraypainted ALL the time. But at least
their cheap.

In design, location context matters.

On May 6, 2009, at 6:02 PM, Christian Crumlish wrote:

> On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 12:18 PM, Angel Marquez <angel.marquez at gmail.com
> >wrote:
>
>> + I wouldn't want a touchscreen in a public space like BART for
>> obvious
>> reasons.
>>
>
> What about the mechanical buttons on the current BART kiosk
> machines. Would
> you touch them?
>
> -x-
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

7 May 2009 - 5:57am
Scott McDaniel
2007

I'm pretty much compelled to rub my face against touchscreens, which
is why I'm banned from all Apple stores. I can just push a button
with a digit, no problemo.

Scott

On Thu, May 7, 2009 at 1:51 AM, live <human.factor.one at gmail.com> wrote:
> This has nothing to do with hygiene and everything to do with ROI.
> Touchscreen vs simple screens in price are VERY different.
>
> Currently simple screens get spraypainted ALL the time. But at least their
> cheap.
>
> In design, location context matters.
>
>
>
> On May 6, 2009, at 6:02 PM, Christian Crumlish wrote:
>
>> On Wed, May 6, 2009 at 12:18 PM, Angel Marquez
>> <angel.marquez at gmail.com>wrote:
>>
>>> + I wouldn't want a touchscreen in a public space like BART for obvious
>>> reasons.
>>>
>>
>> What about the mechanical buttons on the current BART kiosk machines.
>> Would
>> you touch them?
>>
>> -x---
-----The Key to Joy is Disobedience -----
-there is no guilt and there is no shame-

9 May 2009 - 3:48pm
cfmdesigns
2004

I'm someone who uses BART several times in a weekend, but only one or
two weekends a year. And I'm a software tester by career.

The stops that I routinely use are the two airports, the one near
work, the one near the hotel, and the Caltrain stop.

Some comments I had:

* I don't think of the work stop I use as "24th St. Mission", even if
that's the official name. I think of it as "Mission and 24th" -- that
is, I think of the cross street *first*. And thus when I went through
the alpha list of stations (or the "identify where you are" at the
start), I had a harder time finding what I wanted. In such lists --
which are a form of index -- have more than just the official name.
Have "Mission & 24th" and "Oakland Airport". Be helpful, not limiting.

* Most zones have more stops than there are buttons, and have a More
button. In most of those, the station I wanted was behind the More
wall, and thus required more clicks. Some of the stations are going
to be more popular or more significant destinations -- the airports,
the CalTrain transfers -- and should probably not be hidden a layer
deep.

* The More button was always close the hidden map sections, but More
buttons are (almost) always at the end of a list. I expected it at
item G, not E

* I had to make an effort to map the station names on the zone map to
the large names to the buttons. Maybe adding a button indicator next
to the station on the zone map would help?

* Some times I know what part of the Bay Area I want to go to, but not
which station to use. (I lived in the Bay Area for a decade and can't
tell you just where Balboa Park or El Cerrito are, with respect to
neighboring stations.) A way to show a real map rather than a
stylized route map would help some users.

-- Jim

10 May 2009 - 12:02pm
Eugene Kim
2005

Hi Ljuba and Ben, sounds like a fun project. I took the liberty of
making a couple changes:

http://tinyurl.com/r45gwc

- I brought back the bounding boxes around the selection items... I
thought it might help distinguish between the top and bottom
sections. It's also familiar to existing users.
- Reserved the START OVER button until the user is on the purchase
screen. I think I understand how you wanted to create a consistent
global navigation, but it took up precious space and seemed to add
unnecessary noise. Sometimes the user really just wants to go back
one level and from the zoomed in map it's just 2 levels away from
the beginning menu.
- Circled the letters on the system map in an attempt to better match
the keys with the selections.
- Widened the color tabs on the system map view.
- Removed the RETURN TO MAP button (it was redundant with the BACK
button).
- Included a MORE STATIONS button when there are more available and
placed this at the bottom (H key).
- Changed the placement of items on the purchase screen... at this
point, I feel the START OVER button is warranted.
- Added an area for helpful information on the success page. Perhaps
helpful information would include things like next departure time,
platform, which specific train, etc.

Good luck!

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=41790

10 May 2009 - 1:30pm
Todd Diemer
2009

Good work so far. I am also from out of town, but rely on the Chicago
public transit system to get around.

A couple of comments from the outsider's perspective:

1. When selecting a certain destination, there is an increased
cognitive load when the user moves from a spacial representation of
the entire system down to a straight line for the individual
stations. You all probably made this choice to help keep the
selection of individual stations more standardized. Could you run
some usability tests to see if users are more comfortable with a
zoomed in map instead of the straight line?

2. I am always nervous when traveling in an unfamiliar city. For me
it would be great if on the purchase ticket screen, where you have
the "Origin" station and "Destination" station listed with an
arrow between them, to have a listing of all the stations in between
and color code it for any changes of trains I might have to make.
This would reinforce my understanding of how to get around the city.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=41790

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