Guiding successful product development

7 Apr 2009 - 3:24pm
5 years ago
4 replies
536 reads
livlab
2003

Hi all,

I am looking for examples of brand/product/company guidelines or
principles that are/were truly useful to guide and direct
product/service development (not just advertising and marketing messages).

I asked this on the IA Institute members list and got a few:

* Luke W on Microsoft's use of design principles:
http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?796

* Google UX principles
http://www.google.com/corporate/ux.html

* Sony's design philosophy
http://www.sony.net/Fun/design/profile/philosophy.html

Do you have any examples or experiences to share? I'm curious about
a. how they are conveyed (a document, a website, a mantra) and
b. how people use them (checklists, part of project selection criteria,
pin them to their cube walls, etc).

Note: I am particularly interested in artifacts that associate the
overall brand/image to how stuff gets done so I'm not looking for things
that generally lead up to successful products like "have a good product
manager" or "do usability testing early".

Thanks!

Comments

7 Apr 2009 - 3:48pm
Scott Berkun
2008

In studying guidelines and why they work or are ignored in organizations,
it's important to consider who in general management supports them.

Fantastic guidelines without a champion are useless. Whereas even mediocre
guidelines with high profile and proactive champions, are incredibly
effective.

So I'd argue how effective these things are, or are not, has more to do with
how much support they had, than how good the actual guidelines were.

Guidelines, however clever or insightful, are just recommendations. They
don't have any power on their own, unless people are rewarded for following
them by leaders in the organization. It's very very easy to have a fantastic
set of guidelines that get talked about once in awhile, but have no
discernable impact on what goes out the door.

Sometimes in successful groups, the guidelines are created *after* the fact
- they are used to capture the spirit of the organization for those who come
later (I think the first UI guidelines from Apple were released several
years after the first Macintosh - I'm sure someone on the list can confirm
or deny :).

-Scott

Scott Berkun
www.scottberkun.com

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Livia
Labate
Sent: Tuesday, April 07, 2009 1:25 PM
To: list IXDA
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Guiding successful product development

Hi all,

I am looking for examples of brand/product/company guidelines or principles
that are/were truly useful to guide and direct product/service development
(not just advertising and marketing messages).

7 Apr 2009 - 4:55pm
Katie Albers
2005

Actually, the interface standards for the Mac pre-date the release of
the first Mac and were given to the software developers for that first
machine. Those vendors were sought out and actively courted partly
because interface requirements were a new concept. When the standards
became more generally available, I'm not sure.

kt

Katie Albers
Founder & Principal Consultant
FirstThought
User Experience Strategy & Project Management
310 356 7550
katie at firstthought.com

On Apr 7, 2009, at 1:48 PM, Scott Berkun wrote:

>
> In studying guidelines and why they work or are ignored in
> organizations,
> it's important to consider who in general management supports them.
>
> Fantastic guidelines without a champion are useless. Whereas even
> mediocre
> guidelines with high profile and proactive champions, are incredibly
> effective.
>
> So I'd argue how effective these things are, or are not, has more to
> do with
> how much support they had, than how good the actual guidelines were.
>
> Guidelines, however clever or insightful, are just recommendations.
> They
> don't have any power on their own, unless people are rewarded for
> following
> them by leaders in the organization. It's very very easy to have a
> fantastic
> set of guidelines that get talked about once in awhile, but have no
> discernable impact on what goes out the door.
>
> Sometimes in successful groups, the guidelines are created *after*
> the fact
> - they are used to capture the spirit of the organization for those
> who come
> later (I think the first UI guidelines from Apple were released
> several
> years after the first Macintosh - I'm sure someone on the list can
> confirm
> or deny :).
>
> -Scott
>
> Scott Berkun
> www.scottberkun.com
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
> [mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of
> Livia
> Labate
> Sent: Tuesday, April 07, 2009 1:25 PM
> To: list IXDA
> Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Guiding successful product development
>
> Hi all,
>
> I am looking for examples of brand/product/company guidelines or
> principles
> that are/were truly useful to guide and direct product/service
> development
> (not just advertising and marketing messages).
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

7 Apr 2009 - 5:30pm
Angel Marquez
2008

Check out the Standards, Guidelines, and Best Practices from microsoft,
nintendo, & sony for the Xbox, Wii, PS3, DS, PSP, etc. very branding centric
interaction design guides.

8 Apr 2009 - 4:28pm
Jennifer Vignone
2008

Hi:

I have been involved in several branding efforts and the guidelines are
useful only to the degree that they are supported and disseminated. This
was something we (the teams I was a part of) understood from the start,
and so the advertising, selling, evangelizing -- whatever term one cares
to use here, was a part of the guideline effort.

With that understanding in mind, and involving the people who would be
using the guidelines -- business, developers, designers, user experience
(again whatever term for that delicate balance), in the process, we were
able to learn how to approach each group and gain buy in as the guidelines
developed and were launched.

So, the guidelines themselves are one piece. Involving those you want/need
to use them and support them is just as critical to success.

Once in use, I have found the guidelines to be supported and of value. And
I have always taken the approach to break down the levels of adherence so
that converts could used a stepped approach to incorporation into their
environment. This made it seem less like a guideline anvil, taking the
pressure off of incorporating many things at once.

Jennifer
Jennifer Vignone
User Experience Design
CIO Technology
270 Park Avenue, 7 Floor
New York, NY 10167
212-834-9509
jennifer.r.vignone at jpmorgan.com

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Livia
Labate
Sent: Tuesday, April 07, 2009 1:25 PM
To: list IXDA
Subject: [IxDA Discuss] Guiding successful product development

Hi all,

I am looking for examples of brand/product/company guidelines or
principles
that are/were truly useful to guide and direct product/service development
(not just advertising and marketing messages).

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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