Developing an effective User Experience/Usability strategy

19 Mar 2009 - 12:23pm
5 years ago
4 replies
1389 reads
Mario Bourque
2008

Is there any information out there on how to design/write an effective
UX/Usability strategy?

I believe there are no specific generic models out there for study (I am
probably way off on this).

Are there any existing resources OR is this an org specific thing? I would
appreciate any comments, ideas, or experiences you may have had or are
having.

Please email to me directly, unless it is addressed to the group.

Thank you.

--
Mario Bourque
Web: www.mariobourque.com
Email: mario at mariobourque.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/mariobourque

Comments

19 Mar 2009 - 8:44pm
Victor Lombardi
2003

Hi Mario,

It's rare to find examples of particular design strategies for study
outside a university program, probably because organizations consider
them confidential. And so a common understanding of what design
strategy is doesn't seem to exist in our field.

The best analogous field you can look to is product development which
has a long and robust history of studying and documenting its
practices. Jeff Lash has some resources here:
http://www.goodproductmanager.com/resources

In a nutshell, when I create a strategy I think about the kinds of
things one might consider for a company strategy, but at the product
or service level, such as
* The immediate opportunity
* The customer's situation
* The competitive landscape
* Revenue streams and models, with plausible estimates (or benefits
if there's no direct revenue)
* Risks
* Peripheral opportunities
* Intersection with related elements such as brand identity,
marketing channels, sales, customer service, tech support, backend
systems, etc.
* Roadmap, which accounts for all of the above as it shifts over the
next x years

The roadmap, IMHO, is one of the most important pieces and what sets
a strategic plan apart from a tactical plan.

Best,
Victor

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=40185

20 Mar 2009 - 12:17am
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

>
> * The immediate opportunity
> * The customer's situation
> * The competitive landscape
> * Revenue streams and models, with plausible estimates (or benefits
> if there's no direct revenue)
> * Risks
> * Peripheral opportunities
> * Intersection with related elements such as brand identity,
> marketing channels, sales, customer service, tech support, backend
> systems, etc.
> * Roadmap, which accounts for all of the above as it shifts over the
> next x years
>

The most important thing a company can have is a *vision*. And to me, the
strategy comes out of the vision, but many companies fail to communicate any
sort of vision to its staff (or perhaps even define one in the first place),
and any strategy will suffer as a result.

Vision > Strategy > Tactics > Evaluation

Every company has a story. Find out what it is and you can build from it.
What does the company really want? Why? How do the people who run it want
their products and services to fit into peoples' lives? What do they want
their company to *mean*? If this is clear, then a strategy is just an
approach to accomplishing those goals. And then the list above can become
very important.

Note, though, that the list above doesn't compose a "strategy"—rather, it's
a list of things you should consider in order to form an intelligent
strategy. The list is important, yes, but what Mario is asking about, I
think, is what you pull *out* of the list.

A "strategy" is often remarkably uncomplicated. The list above *informs* it.
Lists of short- and long-term tactical plans *support* it. But the strategy
itself is often pretty easy to communicate. It could be a sketch on the back
of a napkin.

-r-

20 Mar 2009 - 1:49am
dszuc
2005

Suggest one of the hardest components of a strategy is
"implementation" and getting people in an organization to embrace
it, live it and play it out across all the channels (especially in
larger organizations)

Maybe its better to start on a"smaller piece" first and let the
strategy blossom from there (as opposed to trying to take on
everything)

Be interested to know and learn where people have seen strategies
play out as planned. Why do they think it worked well?

rgds,
Dan

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=40185

20 Mar 2009 - 8:40am
Victor Lombardi
2003

On Fri, Mar 20, 2009 at 1:17 AM, Robert Hoekman Jr <robert at rhjr.net> wrote:
>
> The most important thing a company can have is a vision. And to me, the
> strategy comes out of the vision, but many companies fail to communicate any
> sort of vision to its staff (or perhaps even define one in the first place),
> and any strategy will suffer as a result.
> Vision > Strategy > Tactics > Evaluation
...

Yes, and this is important when you find the strategy isn't working.
You can see this in the book Founders at Work
(http://www.foundersatwork.com/) which is composed of interviews with
founders of software start-ups. In many cases the original idea didn't
fly, but the companies ultimately succeeded through a willingness to
scrap the original strategy and regroup, guided by their vision as
well as emergent ideas such as new potential for the technology or
customer feedback.

I'm an amateur here, but John Hagel has a compelling prescription that
integrates short-term feedback with the longer-term vision...
http://www.johnhagel.com/view20030520.shtml

Victor

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