Video autoplay

3 Mar 2009 - 1:35pm
5 years ago
5 replies
1432 reads
Celeste Cefalu
2007

Good Morning Ixda!

Working on a project for a business who relies heavily on video autoplay to
drive up video views and ad inventory. As a UCD practitioner, I wholly
believe in my heart of hearts that more is lost than gained in turning
people away from the site based on the aggravation and annoyance of
autoplay. I'm attempting to build a case that removing autoplay will incease
visits, page views, and time spent metrics in the long run. Additionally,
the business will have a better understanding of content consumed by site
visitors by providing an on demand experience. This is a huge leap of faith,
or is it? Do we have any data that could help??

Comments

3 Mar 2009 - 2:31pm
Andy Edmonds
2004

While perhaps not great ammo for your case, I do have an interesting
conclusion from testing auto-play. We installed videos on product
pages that auto-played for about 45 seconds in a split test
configuration (no video, vs autoplay). The effect was slightly
negative on conversion, but we could isolate segments of traffic for
whom the change seemed to improve conversion.

When we moved over to click to play we found a 35% conversion boost
for products with videos. It turns out the average time on a product
page was well below 45 seconds. I hypothesize that users were wasting
scarce time watching videos for products that they weren't especially
interested in. Letting the user pick when to watch the videos worked
much better in this e-commerce scenario.

(Note: this is also recounted as test #50 in Marketing Sherpa's
"Marketing Wisdom for 2008"
http://www.marketingsherpa.com/store/downloads/Wisdom2008.pdf )

hth, Andy

On Tue, Mar 3, 2009 at 1:35 PM, Celeste Cefalu <celeste.cefalu at gmail.com> wrote:
> Good Morning Ixda!
>
> Working on a project for a business who relies heavily on video autoplay to
> drive up video views and ad inventory. As a UCD practitioner, I wholly
> believe in my heart of hearts that more is lost than gained in turning
> people away from the site based on the aggravation and annoyance of
> autoplay. I'm attempting to build a case that removing autoplay will incease
> visits, page views, and time spent metrics in the long run. Additionally,
> the business will have a better understanding of content consumed by site
> visitors by providing an on demand experience. This is a huge leap of faith,
> or is it? Do we have any data that could help??
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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>

3 Mar 2009 - 3:06pm
robenslin
2008

Hi Celeste,

As a thought I'm wondering if you looked at historical analytical (web
stats) data & ran comparisons you might find, for instance, that
affected pages show an increase in bounce rates - visitors leaving
after only visiting that single page? If that's the case arguing
against metrics is tough.

-- Rob

// Rob Enslin

On 3 Mar 2009, at 18:35, Celeste Cefalu <celeste.cefalu at gmail.com>
wrote:

> Good Morning Ixda!
>
> Working on a project for a business who relies heavily on video
> autoplay to
> drive up video views and ad inventory. As a UCD practitioner, I wholly
> believe in my heart of hearts that more is lost than gained in turning
> people away from the site based on the aggravation and annoyance of
> autoplay. I'm attempting to build a case that removing autoplay will
> incease
> visits, page views, and time spent metrics in the long run.
> Additionally,
> the business will have a better understanding of content consumed by
> site
> visitors by providing an on demand experience. This is a huge leap
> of faith,
> or is it? Do we have any data that could help??
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

3 Mar 2009 - 3:11pm
James Wanless
2009

You also might point to anecdotal evidence that virtually every video site
on the web brings you to a player that puts playback control in the hands of
the user, YouTube, Vimeo - take your pick.

Also, some of the well-worn usability advice around the notion of not taking
control away from your users is also good to highlight. I agree with
backing these heuristics up with some solid metrics on bounces and
engagement time if you've got that information.

James

On Tue, Mar 3, 2009 at 12:06 PM, Rob Enslin <robenslin at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi Celeste,
>
> As a thought I'm wondering if you looked at historical analytical (web
> stats) data & ran comparisons you might find, for instance, that affected
> pages show an increase in bounce rates - visitors leaving after only
> visiting that single page? If that's the case arguing against metrics is
> tough.
>
> -- Rob
> // Rob Enslin
>
>
> On 3 Mar 2009, at 18:35, Celeste Cefalu <celeste.cefalu at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>

4 Mar 2009 - 1:29am
Trip O'Dell
2007

Celeste:

I don't know if quantitative research is the right way to prove your
point in this case. "My numbers are bigger than yours" is typically
the wrong approach with product teams in my experience.

A good resource to look at might be Reevs and Nass: The Media
Equation. Their premise is essentially that we react to media exactly
as we would other people. Autoplay sucks because its just plain rude.
Its like the people who aggressively sell cell phones and credit
cards from kiosks in the shopping mall. They walk up to you,
interrupt what you're doing and just start trying to engage you. Its
a violation of your personal space. We don't expect that from
strangers.

The same logic applies to video/audio that autoplays without user
input. Interacting with software is an example of shared agency
between the user and the system. The user makes requests, and the
user responds. When the system responds without a request from the
user its very off putting. From a design standpoint, its tantamount
to breaking faith with the user.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=39477

4 Mar 2009 - 4:50am
Harry Brignull
2004

Hi,

On youtube, the video starts playing automatically on a video page, e.g.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YevYBsShxNs
This makes sense to me: implicit in the act of going to a youtube video page
is the desire to watch that video. (Though it creates an annoying cacophony
if you open a load of pages in tabs).

However, I think when you embed a video from youtube on another site, it
does not start playing by default, presumably because (a) it's annoying if
videos start playing on pages where you weren't expecting them and (b)
people may embed multiple youtube videos in a page. For example:
http://www.90percentofeverything.com/youtube-test/

If you want, you can append "&autoplay=1" to the end of the URL in the embed
parameters, but that's for special cases.

It strikes me that there's a big difference between having a video autoplay
on a youtube video page, and having a video autoplay on a product detail
page on an ecommerce site.

Celeste, what's your client's business?

Harry

--
http://www.90percentofeverything.com

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