Gestural/Multi-touch and dexterity?

21 Feb 2009 - 4:15pm
5 years ago
2 replies
895 reads
Georgette Sulllivan
2009

I’m an interaction graduate student researching gestural/mutli-touch
interactions on handheld devices and problems caused by compromised
dexterity (young, old, injured or disabled). Since these devices are
the new cool thing or have a loyal following I am having a hard time
finding data to support my theory.

Can anyone help me out and point me in the right direction?

Comments

24 Feb 2009 - 6:09pm
Gilbert Guerrero9
2008

Hi,

I think the problems you're looking for aren't cause by gestural/multi-
touch interfaces, they're caused by limited, or possibly poorly,
designed interfaces. I found this article to be interesting:

"A Touch Screen Phone for Those Who Can’t See the Screen"
http://www.healthnews.com/blogs/nicki/natural-health/a-touch-screen-phone-those-who-can-t-see-screen-2466.html

You would think that if you are blind, or perhaps not looking at the
screen for a long period of time (maybe texting while driving?
(illegal in California now!)), then you might want to avoid gestural
or multi-touch devices because you can't feel the hardware. There's
not buttons to run your hand over. But this article points out that
it's not the device, it's the design of the interface that makes these
interactions hard.

Here's an example from the article of a way to design a touch screen
phone to allow someone who can't see the screen to dial:

"Mr. Raman has invented something called a dialer to use with his TG1
mobile. This device determines what he is trying to access relative to
its position on the screen...the first place Mr. Raman touches on the
screen is considered to be a five by the dialer. The dialer then
calculates what number Mr. Raman is dialing relative to the five. For
instance, if he goes up and slightly to the left, he is dialing a 1,
while if he goes down and to the right, he is dialing a nine."

Now that's smart!

I thought of suggesting to you to look for articles about people with
Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), an extremely debilitating disease. I've
done some work designing for this group and we were always hyper aware
of the abilities of the users. However, poking around the web looking
for articles on touch screens and RA, it looks like everything seems
to say that it's better than having to fill out paper forms or type on
keyboards and point and click with a mouse. I'd have to agree, from
everything I've seen.

Well, in any case, good luck to you!

Best,
Gilbert

On Feb 21, 2009, at 2:15 PM, Georgette Sullivan wrote:

> I’m an interaction graduate student researching gestural/mutli-touch
> interactions on handheld devices and problems caused by compromised
> dexterity (young, old, injured or disabled). Since these devices are
> the new cool thing or have a loyal following I am having a hard time
> finding data to support my theory.
>
> Can anyone help me out and point me in the right direction?
>
>
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25 Feb 2009 - 5:53pm
Jarod Tang
2007

Since iphone is out for years, it's possible for you to find the
people who use it in daily life. Especially in u.s. or japan.

Or you can offer it to some tagert group, and let them us it
themselves for sometime(two weeks or even longer). And you can keep
your ethnogrphy on that. Nothing new.
--jarod

On Sat, 21 Feb 2009 14:15:03, Georgette Sullivan
<georgette at georgettesullivan.com> wrote:
> I’m an interaction graduate student researching gestural/mutli-touch
> interactions on handheld devices and problems caused by compromised
> dexterity (young, old, injured or disabled). Since these devices are
> the new cool thing or have a loyal following I am having a hard time
> finding data to support my theory.
>
> Can anyone help me out and point me in the right direction?
>
>

--
Sent from my mobile device

http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

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