iPhone Custom Application Standards andemulators for testing - reference

4 Feb 2009 - 12:43pm
5 years ago
5 replies
792 reads
Evan K. Stone
2008

> Can anyone point to iPhone custom application design standards. And
> the emulators available for testing the application in our local
machine.

It depends what you want to do. It sounds like you want to develop
native iPhone applications, not web applications, so that rules out
iPhoney and Safari in developer mode.

For developing native iPhone applications, the guidelines, resources,
and tools you need are available on the Apple iPhone Developer website:

http://developer.apple.com/iphone/

All you have to do is sign up for their free developer program
(http://developer.apple.com/iphone/program/develop.html) and download
the SDK, which includes an iPhone simulator. One thing to keep in mind
is that the tools not only require a Mac, they require OS X 10.5
(Leopard). So you might want to make sure you have a Mac that is running
Leopard first.

Additionally, if you don't have access to an iPhone, don't overlook the
possibility of using an iPod Touch for testing. It's an awesome device
in its own right, perfect as a testing device (except for testing cell
network bandwidth since it only does wi-fi), and can be had for around
$150 on eBay. My iPod touch enabled me to do just about everything an
iPhone could do (except call people), and I used it for over a year
until I finally took the iPhone plunge. No regrets. Highly recommended.
And no monthly fee! ;)

Hope this helps!

evan k. stone | ux | dragnet solutions, inc.

Comments

5 Feb 2009 - 1:36pm
Andre Charland
2008

I'm not sure what type of app you're trying to build, but you could also
consider www.phonegap.com. It's open source development framework that lets
you build native iPhone and Android apps with plain old HTML and JavaScript
so you can design and test right in the browser. Also I seem to remember
somebody build an iPhone simulator in Adobe AIR that you could use for
design and testing. I can't seem to find it now though, even with the power
of the Google.

2009/2/4 Evan K. Stone <evan.stone at dragnetsolutions.com>

> > Can anyone point to iPhone custom application design standards. And
> > the emulators available for testing the application in our local
> machine.
>
> It depends what you want to do. It sounds like you want to develop
> native iPhone applications, not web applications, so that rules out
> iPhoney and Safari in developer mode.
>
> For developing native iPhone applications, the guidelines, resources,
> and tools you need are available on the Apple iPhone Developer website:
>
> http://developer.apple.com/iphone/
>
> All you have to do is sign up for their free developer program
> (http://developer.apple.com/iphone/program/develop.html) and download
> the SDK, which includes an iPhone simulator. One thing to keep in mind
> is that the tools not only require a Mac, they require OS X 10.5
> (Leopard). So you might want to make sure you have a Mac that is running
> Leopard first.
>
> Additionally, if you don't have access to an iPhone, don't overlook the
> possibility of using an iPod Touch for testing. It's an awesome device
> in its own right, perfect as a testing device (except for testing cell
> network bandwidth since it only does wi-fi), and can be had for around
> $150 on eBay. My iPod touch enabled me to do just about everything an
> iPhone could do (except call people), and I used it for over a year
> until I finally took the iPhone plunge. No regrets. Highly recommended.
> And no monthly fee! ;)
>
> Hope this helps!
>
> evan k. stone | ux | dragnet solutions, inc.
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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--
André Charland
President and Co-Founder, Nitobi
e. andre.charland at gmail.com
skype. ebadre
b. http://blogs.nitobi.com/andre
w. http://www.nitobi.com

6 Feb 2009 - 3:27am
Pietro Desiato
2008

what kind of iPhone development are you looking for? I suggest you to clear
your ideas on that. You can develop an iPhone app in two different
ways\style: web development and native app. Both have pros and cons. Which
one you should go for depends on what your app(s) are going to be like.
Native apps mean objective-c and depth (and harder) programming: you can
control the iPhone as you prefer (memory, services, gps, camera and so on).
Web dev is easier to deploy and you don't have to pass through the Apple
quality control...

6 Feb 2009 - 6:43pm
Gavin Burke
2008

We have just finished an iPhone application. Its hard to beat
designing on the device itself as there are a lot of things that only
become
apparent when its running on the phone. The simulator is good, but its
only that, a simulator. Opening dummy interfaces as images and testing
things that way on the device can be a compromise if your not up to
placing actual controls in objective c.

On 5 Feb 2009, at 19:36, Andre Charland wrote:

> I'm not sure what type of app you're trying to build, but you could
> also
> consider www.phonegap.com. It's open source development framework
> that lets
> you build native iPhone and Android apps with plain old HTML and
> JavaScript
> so you can design and test right in the browser. Also I seem to
> remember
> somebody build an iPhone simulator in Adobe AIR that you could use for
> design and testing. I can't seem to find it now though, even with
> the power
> of the Google.

6 Feb 2009 - 8:47pm
Angel Marquez
2008

>> objective cDo the interaction designers at Apple just use Interface
Builder nibs to create their wireframes?

6 Feb 2009 - 9:20pm
Gavin Burke
2008

We used standard cocoa controls and workflows for most of the
application and so had a good idea of how things would work.
It was easy to draw a background image for a screen in photoshop and
then position the real controls in code over the top, filling in the
parts and testing how it felt as we went along.

Maybe apple did something like this, having established the basic
navigation workflows/controls/rules and they then started designing
the applications with what was available, maybe adding new ones when
they hit special case brick walls.

On interface builder, it has some way to go yet before you could build
a complete application interface in it. You can see this from the
iPhone application examples, they tend to use it just to setup the
basic pages/frames. But on paper you should be able to build a
complete working wire frame.

On 7 Feb 2009, at 02:47, Angel Marquez wrote:

> >> objective c
> Do the interaction designers at Apple just use Interface Builder
> nibs to create their wireframes?
>
>

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