Information through sound.

26 Jan 2009 - 6:01pm
5 years ago
26 replies
405 reads
Angel Marquez
2008

Theatre has been doing it for centuries.
On Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 7:06 AM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo <
lparra at uniandes.edu.co> wrote:

>
> Hi All,
>
>
> I just started working with sound as a source of information, among other
> things, and my starting point was Gestalt, and basic design principles to
> study sound pieces, from sound artists to raw pop, it seems to me there's a
> need to put together some sort of document which talks about this, framing
> sound within our design realm. And I'm not talking from the "sound design"
> perspective, since it appears to be a whole different discipline. What I'm
> looking for is, to find a design answer to understand sound as a critical
> piece of a communication/product/interactive/experience piece.
> I've been in touch with the max/msp community, but their approach to sound
> is located further away in the art spectrum. So my questions are quite
> broad, who's working on this, and which docs/books should I look for to find
> further info?
>
> Thank you very much!
>
> Best,
>
> Leonardo Parra.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

Comments

26 Jan 2009 - 7:40pm
Dan Saffer
2003

Good article by Paul Robare and Jodi Forlizzi in the recent issue of
Interactions magazine: "Sound in Computing: A Short History" if you
can track it down.

Dan

26 Jan 2009 - 8:02pm
Angel Marquez
2008

http://www.designingforinteraction.com/toc.html
Page 51.

On Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Dan Saffer <dan at odannyboy.com> wrote:

> Good article by Paul Robare and Jodi Forlizzi in the recent issue of
> Interactions magazine: "Sound in Computing: A Short History" if you can
> track it down.
>
> Dan
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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>

27 Jan 2009 - 9:03am
neilnoakes
2009

i'd recommend reading this book by Michel Chion.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Audio-Vision-Sound-Screen-M-Chion/dp/0231078994

although it is conceived as a response to the use of sound in film
there is strong cross over to interactive media. the critical
discussion touches on innate human factors and perception which will
will give you a decent understanding of the cognitive processes at
play.

hth
n

2009/1/27 Angel Marquez <angel.marquez at gmail.com>:
> http://www.designingforinteraction.com/toc.html
> Page 51.
>
> On Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Dan Saffer <dan at odannyboy.com> wrote:
>
>> Good article by Paul Robare and Jodi Forlizzi in the recent issue of
>> Interactions magazine: "Sound in Computing: A Short History" if you can
>> track it down.
>>
>> Dan
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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>

27 Jan 2009 - 12:43pm
Andy Polaine
2008

The issue of Interactions that Dan mentioned is here (with some
comments by people too): http://interactions.acm.org/content/?p=1214

Paul Robare's site is here - http://www.paulrobare.com/index.html -
might be worth getting in touch with him.

It's an interesting and oft overlooked area of interaction/experience
design (judging by the crappy bleeps that most of my gadgets emit).

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Interaction & Experience Design
Research | Writing | Education

Twitter: apolaine
Skype: apolaine

http://playpen.polaine.com
http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
http://www.omnium.net.au
http://www.antirom.com

27 Jan 2009 - 3:33pm
tstutts
2008

Yes, I recommend the Chion text too! I referred to it often in a course on
sound editing I taught at California Design College a couple years ago. The
terms are helpful, because they are conceptual, and entirely unique to
sound, whereas some theorists will try to adapt language from other
disciplines, that doesn't really work in this space.
Good luck,

Tim Stutts
Interaction Designer / Sound Designer
www.sound-interactions.com

On Tue, Jan 27, 2009 at 6:03 AM, neil noakes <neil at socialfabric.co.uk>wrote:

> i'd recommend reading this book by Michel Chion.
> http://www.amazon.co.uk/Audio-Vision-Sound-Screen-M-Chion/dp/0231078994
>
> although it is conceived as a response to the use of sound in film
> there is strong cross over to interactive media. the critical
> discussion touches on innate human factors and perception which will
> will give you a decent understanding of the cognitive processes at
> play.
>
> hth
> n
>
> 2009/1/27 Angel Marquez <angel.marquez at gmail.com>:
> > http://www.designingforinteraction.com/toc.html
> > Page 51.
> >
> > On Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Dan Saffer <dan at odannyboy.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Good article by Paul Robare and Jodi Forlizzi in the recent issue of
> >> Interactions magazine: "Sound in Computing: A Short History" if you can
> >> track it down.
> >>
> >> Dan
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> ________________________________________________________________
> >> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> >> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> >> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> >> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >>
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
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--
tim stutts
******* sound-interactions.com
******* myspace.com/thenewlordx
******* lordx.tumblr.com
940 Jackson St. #3, San Francisco
mobile: 415 254-8295

27 Jan 2009 - 1:11pm
Anonymous

I am currently exploring the use of sound in auditory menus through my
research at Georgia Tech. A colleague recently compiled a tech report
on this topic, full of recent trends (mostly academic) and publication
references. If anyone on this list is interested in obtaining a copy,
please contact me directly.

I was able to find the article recommended by Dan Saffer, "Sound in
Computing: A Short History". I can send that as well.

Take a look at the icad.org for useful publications on auditory
displays.

This thread has inspired me to bring a cell phone with a few of our
recent audio menu designs on it for people to explore at IxDA next
week. I would love to chat with anyone who is interested in this
area.

Thanks,
Anya

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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28 Jan 2009 - 8:10am
Rob Tannen
2006

Here's a list of postings related to sound in product design - scroll
to the bottom for basic information on acoustics and sound -

http://tinyurl.com/c2r65g

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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28 Jan 2009 - 2:15pm
Anonymous

Well, I'm not thinking of the interface, what I'm trying to do is to
find a way to look at sound from a design perspective, as a non-
musician and non-sound expert, I find extremely complicated to look
at sound, and think of it as a useful medium in design, even though
in some cases sound is critical to an interface. Let me put an
example here, think of processing, a programming environment for
artists and designers without the structural knowledge acquired in
engineering programs. It is certain that to understand and make
things with processing, there's a need for an introduction to
programming, but it's way less painful than digging into C++ from
scratch, if you're not familiar with programming structures. Such a
perspective, put in sound, would be a great resource for interaction
design, and the all design siblings.

: )

-Leonardo.

On Jan 26, 2009, at 6:33 PM, Aaron Harmon wrote:

> What are you looking at with sound? If you're phoenetic utterances
> and language, then linguistics and in particular the subfield of
> discourse analysis are particularly useful.
>
> The book This Is Your Brain On Music is a good primer for how the
> brain processes music. It can be a good gateway to music theory as
> well.
>
> Abstract sound interfaces are also useful, but often less
> informative - telling the user input is required (like dialtone) or
> as a warning (sirens and car horns or the beeping crosswalks in
> Oakland, CA).
>
> What sort of sound interface where you imagining?
>
> -Aaron
>
>
> On Jan 26, 2009 3:20 PM, "Leonardo Parra Agudelo"
> <lparra at uniandes.edu.co> wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
>
> I just started working with sound as a source of information, among
> other things, and my starting point was Gestalt, and basic design
> principles to study sound pieces, from sound artists to raw pop, it
> seems to me there's a need to put together some sort of document
> which talks about this, framing sound within our design realm. And
> I'm not talking from the "sound design" perspective, since it appears
> to be a whole different discipline. What I'm looking for is, to find
> a design answer to understand sound as a critical piece of a
> communication/product/interactive/experience piece.
> I've been in touch with the max/msp community, but their approach to
> sound is located further away in the art spectrum. So my questions
> are quite broad, who's working on this, and which docs/books should I
> look for to find further info?
>
> Thank you very much!
>
> Best,
>
> Leonardo Parra.
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=37669
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

Leonardo Parra Agudelo
lparra at uniandes.edu.co
Full Time Faculty
Design Department
Architecture and Design School
Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá-Colombia [57-1]-3394949 xt 3268

28 Jan 2009 - 2:22pm
Catriona Macaulay
2007

You might want to contact Graeme Coleman ( http://www.computing.dundee.ac.uk/acstaff/gcoleman/
)at the University of Dundee in the UK who recently successfully
defended a PhD thesis on exactly this topic - tools to help designers
understand soundscapes in order to inform the sound elements of UI
design (I am biased as he was a student of mine but it's a really
interesting step forward in solving this problem).

Catriona Macaulay
Course Director, MSc in Design Ethnography
University of Dundee, UK
http://www.computing.dundee.ac.uk/mde/

On 28 Jan 2009, at 19:15, Leonardo Parra Agudelo wrote:

>
> Well, I'm not thinking of the interface, what I'm trying to do is to
> find a way to look at sound from a design perspective, as a non-
> musician and non-sound expert, I find extremely complicated to look
> at sound, and think of it as a useful medium in design, even though
> in some cases sound is critical to an interface. Let me put an
> example here, think of processing, a programming environment for
> artists and designers without the structural knowledge acquired in
> engineering programs. It is certain that to understand and make
> things with processing, there's a need for an introduction to
> programming, but it's way less painful than digging into C++ from
> scratch, if you're not familiar with programming structures. Such a
> perspective, put in sound, would be a great resource for interaction
> design, and the all design siblings.
>
> : )
>
> -Leonardo.
>
>
>
> On Jan 26, 2009, at 6:33 PM, Aaron Harmon wrote:
>
>> What are you looking at with sound? If you're phoenetic utterances
>> and language, then linguistics and in particular the subfield of
>> discourse analysis are particularly useful.
>>
>> The book This Is Your Brain On Music is a good primer for how the
>> brain processes music. It can be a good gateway to music theory as
>> well.
>>
>> Abstract sound interfaces are also useful, but often less
>> informative - telling the user input is required (like dialtone) or
>> as a warning (sirens and car horns or the beeping crosswalks in
>> Oakland, CA).
>>
>> What sort of sound interface where you imagining?
>>
>> -Aaron
>>
>>
>> On Jan 26, 2009 3:20 PM, "Leonardo Parra Agudelo" <lparra at uniandes.edu.co
>> > wrote:
>>
>> Hi All,
>>
>>
>> I just started working with sound as a source of information, among
>> other things, and my starting point was Gestalt, and basic design
>> principles to study sound pieces, from sound artists to raw pop, it
>> seems to me there's a need to put together some sort of document
>> which talks about this, framing sound within our design realm. And
>> I'm not talking from the "sound design" perspective, since it appears
>> to be a whole different discipline. What I'm looking for is, to find
>> a design answer to understand sound as a critical piece of a
>> communication/product/interactive/experience piece.
>> I've been in touch with the max/msp community, but their approach to
>> sound is located further away in the art spectrum. So my questions
>> are quite broad, who's working on this, and which docs/books should I
>> look for to find further info?
>>
>> Thank you very much!
>>
>> Best,
>>
>> Leonardo Parra.
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=37669
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
> Leonardo Parra Agudelo
> lparra at uniandes.edu.co
> Full Time Faculty
> Design Department
> Architecture and Design School
> Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá-Colombia [57-1]-3394949 xt 3268
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

28 Jan 2009 - 2:24pm
Angel Marquez
2008

So, if I said music theory tells me that major chords induce a happy state
and minor chords the opposite. Are you saying that is not a must know in
progressive menu system? I agree with you though. Someone does not have to
know it has been labeled and studied with these traits to convey their
emotion. It''s either going to work or not. No, debate.
Sound is the most often overlooked element with the most valuable impact.

Light and sound are your friends. They reveal the correct path....

On Wed, Jan 28, 2009 at 11:15 AM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo <
lparra at uniandes.edu.co> wrote:

>
> Well, I'm not thinking of the interface, what I'm trying to do is to find a
> way to look at sound from a design perspective, as a non-musician and
> non-sound expert, I find extremely complicated to look at sound, and think
> of it as a useful medium in design, even though in some cases sound is
> critical to an interface. Let me put an example here, think of processing, a
> programming environment for artists and designers without the structural
> knowledge acquired in engineering programs. It is certain that to understand
> and make things with processing, there's a need for an introduction to
> programming, but it's way less painful than digging into C++ from scratch,
> if you're not familiar with programming structures. Such a perspective, put
> in sound, would be a great resource for interaction design, and the all
> design siblings.
>
> : )
>
> -Leonardo.
>
>
>
> On Jan 26, 2009, at 6:33 PM, Aaron Harmon wrote:
>
> What are you looking at with sound? If you're phoenetic utterances and
>> language, then linguistics and in particular the subfield of discourse
>> analysis are particularly useful.
>>
>> The book This Is Your Brain On Music is a good primer for how the brain
>> processes music. It can be a good gateway to music theory as well.
>>
>> Abstract sound interfaces are also useful, but often less informative -
>> telling the user input is required (like dialtone) or as a warning (sirens
>> and car horns or the beeping crosswalks in Oakland, CA).
>>
>> What sort of sound interface where you imagining?
>>
>> -Aaron
>>
>>
>> On Jan 26, 2009 3:20 PM, "Leonardo Parra Agudelo" <lparra at uniandes.edu.co>
>> wrote:
>>
>> Hi All,
>>
>>
>> I just started working with sound as a source of information, among
>> other things, and my starting point was Gestalt, and basic design
>> principles to study sound pieces, from sound artists to raw pop, it
>> seems to me there's a need to put together some sort of document
>> which talks about this, framing sound within our design realm. And
>> I'm not talking from the "sound design" perspective, since it appears
>> to be a whole different discipline. What I'm looking for is, to find
>> a design answer to understand sound as a critical piece of a
>> communication/product/interactive/experience piece.
>> I've been in touch with the max/msp community, but their approach to
>> sound is located further away in the art spectrum. So my questions
>> are quite broad, who's working on this, and which docs/books should I
>> look for to find further info?
>>
>> Thank you very much!
>>
>> Best,
>>
>> Leonardo Parra.
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Reply to this thread at ixda.org
>> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=37669
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>>
> Leonardo Parra Agudelo
> lparra at uniandes.edu.co
> Full Time Faculty
> Design Department
> Architecture and Design School
> Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá-Colombia [57-1]-3394949 xt 3268
>
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

28 Jan 2009 - 5:19pm
Angel Marquez
2008

Hey Leonardo,Do read it, it is very good. It is only one page; but,
everything on that one page is right on.

I could ramble on for days about how I would use sound in exactly the manner
you described.

I will give you this. It should be a subtle embellishment that complements
the design.

I wish I had the email from my last gig. I was attached to this interactive
menu system I had been working on and could hear how it should unfold,
collapse, expand, breathe. When the time came to implement the sound the
ones chosen might as well have been a toilet flushing. It was horrible. I
wrote a long descriptive logical rational on why the elegance and sexiness
of the design required something that was a subtle enhancement and at least
everything in the same key with progression that could be attributed to the
tempo of the animations. No response. When presented the first thing 1
stakeholder said was what's up with the sound? I bit my lip and nodded my
head and said dunno, maybe they're just place holders.

28 Jan 2009 - 12:50pm
Anonymous

What you're asking for doesn't exist -- while there are some basic
principles for 'sound design' in interactive devices, there are no
Grand Principles for a broad-based experience design/utility
design/service design in sound...you're ahead of the curve.

That doesn't mean people aren't doing it. We've done client work
planning and implementing sound as an elastic component of a brand
and its execution across digital products, ATMs and physical spaces,
etc. I may be able to share some of the design-thinking work if
you're interested. Email me at noel.franus at sonicid.com if you'd
like to know more.

You may also be interested in a podcast I hosted earlier this week on
music and sound, featuring three-dimensional soundscape designer
Martyn Ware (Heaven 17, Human League, Illustrious Company and Sonic
ID), and renowned videogame pinball composer/Windows and Xbox
designer Brian Schmidt.

We touched on the topics of creating for phsyical and virtual worlds,
cultural nuance, human perception and the challenges inherent in
designing for dynamic interactions. Podcast available here:
http://www.smallplateradio.com/042/

Noel Franus
noel.franus at sonicid.com
415.577.6016

Sonic ID US UK
Web: http://sonicid.com
Blog: http://intentionalaudio.com/blog

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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28 Jan 2009 - 9:52am
Anonymous

Here is the complete list of publications from my lab.
http://sonify.psych.gatech.edu/publications/index.html

I recommend this tech report, in particular, to get started:
Yalla, P., & Walker, B. N. (2007). Advanced Auditory Menus. Georgia
Institute of Technology GVU Center Technical Report # GIT-GVU-07-12.
October.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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29 Jan 2009 - 10:05am
Anonymous

Not quite familiar with theatre myself, could you point at some
references?

- Leonardo.

On Jan 26, 2009, at 6:01 PM, Angel Marquez wrote:

> Theatre has been doing it for centuries.
>
> On Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 7:06 AM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
>
> I just started working with sound as a source of information, among
> other things, and my starting point was Gestalt, and basic design
> principles to study sound pieces, from sound artists to raw pop, it
> seems to me there's a need to put together some sort of document
> which talks about this, framing sound within our design realm. And
> I'm not talking from the "sound design" perspective, since it
> appears to be a whole different discipline. What I'm looking for
> is, to find a design answer to understand sound as a critical piece
> of a communication/product/interactive/experience piece.
> I've been in touch with the max/msp community, but their approach
> to sound is located further away in the art spectrum. So my
> questions are quite broad, who's working on this, and which docs/
> books should I look for to find further info?
>
> Thank you very much!
>
> Best,
>
> Leonardo Parra.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

29 Jan 2009 - 2:10pm
Angel Marquez
2008

>>could you point at some references?
Not off hand. I would have to do some digging.

I'm not remembering the term;but, their is one for the sound that
accompanies a character and cues the audience of that characters presence.
Think of the movie JAWS or Friday the 13th. The sound sets the stage for
what is to come. Tension, Chase, Sinister, The Villain has Arrived, beckon
someone or something a certain direction. The Sirens in the book the
Odyssey. My brother in law has Darth Vaders death march for my sisters
ringtone. You know something bad is going to happen.

I did notice the ATM song with multiple people using the machines. I did
just work with a woman showed a demo that used puredata , projectors, and
playlist and an image gallery of memories. Somehow your movement in the 3d
space of the presentation caused certain sounds to trigger with different
images.

If your ever in San Jose they have a pretty hip museum of modern art and
their exhibits usually graze the surface of new media meets artificially
intelligent landscapes.

If something pops up I'll be sure to send it your way.

harmony wheel multi dimensional synchronization...

On Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 7:05 AM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo <
lparra at uniandes.edu.co> wrote:

>
> Not quite familiar with theatre myself, could you point at some references?
>
> - Leonardo.
>
> On Jan 26, 2009, at 6:01 PM, Angel Marquez wrote:
>
> Theatre has been doing it for centuries.
> On Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 7:06 AM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo wrote:
>
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>>
>> I just started working with sound as a source of information, among other
>> things, and my starting point was Gestalt, and basic design principles to
>> study sound pieces, from sound artists to raw pop, it seems to me there's a
>> need to put together some sort of document which talks about this, framing
>> sound within our design realm. And I'm not talking from the "sound design"
>> perspective, since it appears to be a whole different discipline. What I'm
>> looking for is, to find a design answer to understand sound as a critical
>> piece of a communication/product/interactive/experience piece.
>> I've been in touch with the max/msp community, but their approach to sound
>> is located further away in the art spectrum. So my questions are quite
>> broad, who's working on this, and which docs/books should I look for to find
>> further info?
>>
>> Thank you very much!
>>
>> Best,
>>
>> Leonardo Parra.
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

29 Jan 2009 - 2:35pm
Angel Marquez
2008

Ask this guy: http://www.bazooie.com/
We used to test video games together. We worked on the first sony online
music game 'frequency'

I distinctly remember laughing walking down the camera lined observation
hallways both in guitar pose saying pretty soon we are going to battle each
other playing guitars (pre-guitar hero).

We later worked with that guy from that band 'the information society',
remember that 80s song 'I want to know, what you're thinking...'. He does
all the sound at Crystal Dynamics.

Bazooie is a pretty sharp cat. He introduced me to
psychoacoustics<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychoacoustics> and
gave me my first copy of Reason.

good luck and have fun!

On Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 11:10 AM, Angel Marquez <angel.marquez at gmail.com>wrote:

> >>could you point at some references?
> Not off hand. I would have to do some digging.
>
> I'm not remembering the term;but, their is one for the sound that
> accompanies a character and cues the audience of that characters presence.
> Think of the movie JAWS or Friday the 13th. The sound sets the stage for
> what is to come. Tension, Chase, Sinister, The Villain has Arrived, beckon
> someone or something a certain direction. The Sirens in the book the
> Odyssey. My brother in law has Darth Vaders death march for my sisters
> ringtone. You know something bad is going to happen.
>
> I did notice the ATM song with multiple people using the machines. I did
> just work with a woman showed a demo that used puredata , projectors, and
> playlist and an image gallery of memories. Somehow your movement in the 3d
> space of the presentation caused certain sounds to trigger with different
> images.
>
> If your ever in San Jose they have a pretty hip museum of modern art and
> their exhibits usually graze the surface of new media meets artificially
> intelligent landscapes.
>
> If something pops up I'll be sure to send it your way.
>
> harmony wheel multi dimensional synchronization...
>
> On Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 7:05 AM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo <
> lparra at uniandes.edu.co> wrote:
>
>>
>> Not quite familiar with theatre myself, could you point at some
>> references?
>>
>> - Leonardo.
>>
>> On Jan 26, 2009, at 6:01 PM, Angel Marquez wrote:
>>
>> Theatre has been doing it for centuries.
>> On Mon, Jan 26, 2009 at 7:06 AM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Hi All,
>>>
>>>
>>> I just started working with sound as a source of information, among other
>>> things, and my starting point was Gestalt, and basic design principles to
>>> study sound pieces, from sound artists to raw pop, it seems to me there's a
>>> need to put together some sort of document which talks about this, framing
>>> sound within our design realm. And I'm not talking from the "sound design"
>>> perspective, since it appears to be a whole different discipline. What I'm
>>> looking for is, to find a design answer to understand sound as a critical
>>> piece of a communication/product/interactive/experience piece.
>>> I've been in touch with the max/msp community, but their approach to
>>> sound is located further away in the art spectrum. So my questions are quite
>>> broad, who's working on this, and which docs/books should I look for to find
>>> further info?
>>>
>>> Thank you very much!
>>>
>>> Best,
>>>
>>> Leonardo Parra.
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

29 Jan 2009 - 11:25pm
Jeremy Yuille
2007

interesting thread..

one of the things that I find most different with sound as an interactive element is the way it is experienced in relation to itself.. its waaay relative
let me explain: because sound is a time based medium and must be listened to over time to be comprehended, it's hard to talk about sounds without using them - see John Cage for a good quote here.

and, its very difficult to assign absolute meaning to a sound, (at least compared to ow it is for vision)

that being said, during an interesting conversation with Danny Stillion last october about designers and he pointed out that their studio had identified that interaction designers tend to use a "large internal sound palette" when describing experiences.. (imagine the zzzzt! of an accordion pane closing)

also - at chi last year there was a sonic interaction design workshop (didn't go sorry) but there seems to be a wiki with papers here

http://www.cost-sid.org/wiki/CHIprogram

and there seems to be a working group looking at the "Perceptual, cognitive, and emotional study of sonic interactions"

"The activity focuses on extending information and valuable resources (including bibliography, guidelines, methods, and workbenches) on experimental scientific findings about human sound reception in interactive contexts. Research on new experimental paradigms such as neurosciences, ergonomical and psycholinguistic studies will be a stimulating challenge. Basic research will be included as well in these activities, promoting paper publication and dissemination."

sounds pretty heavy... but could be fruitful.

ohyeah - @Anya, I'd be super keen to try out the auditory menu in vancouver!

ok - back to the sound of people's feet sticking to the asphalt.

29 Jan 2009 - 11:25pm
Jeremy Yuille
2007

interesting thread..

one of the things that I find most different with sound as an
interactive element is the way it is experienced in relation to
itself.. its waaay relative
let me explain: because sound is a time based medium and must be
listened to over time to be comprehended, it's hard to talk about
sounds without using them - see John Cage for a good quote here.

and, its very difficult to assign absolute meaning to a sound, (at
least compared to ow it is for vision)

that being said, during an interesting conversation with Danny
Stillion last october about designers and he pointed out that their
studio had identified that interaction designers tend to use a
"large internal sound palette" when describing experiences..
(imagine the zzzzt! of an accordion pane closing)

also - at chi last year there was a sonic interaction design
workshop (didn't go sorry) but there seems to be a wiki with papers
here

http://www.cost-sid.org/wiki/CHIprogram

and there seems to be a working group looking at the "Perceptual,
cognitive, and emotional study of sonic interactions"

"The activity focuses on extending information and valuable
resources (including bibliography, guidelines, methods, and
workbenches) on experimental scientific findings about human sound
reception in interactive contexts. Research on new experimental
paradigms such as neurosciences, ergonomical and psycholinguistic
studies will be a stimulating challenge. Basic research will be
included as well in these activities, promoting paper publication and
dissemination."

sounds pretty heavy... but could be fruitful.

ohyeah - @Anya, I'd be super keen to try out the auditory menu in
vancouver!

ok - back to the sound of people's feet sticking to the asphalt.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=37669

30 Jan 2009 - 12:27am
Angel Marquez
2008

doppler effect?

On Thu, Jan 29, 2009 at 8:25 PM, Jeremy Yuille <overlobe at isomorpho.us>wrote:

> interesting thread..
>
> one of the things that I find most different with sound as an
> interactive element is the way it is experienced in relation to
> itself.. its waaay relative
> let me explain: because sound is a time based medium and must be
> listened to over time to be comprehended, it's hard to talk about
> sounds without using them - see John Cage for a good quote here.
>
> and, its very difficult to assign absolute meaning to a sound, (at
> least compared to ow it is for vision)
>
> that being said, during an interesting conversation with Danny
> Stillion last october about designers and he pointed out that their
> studio had identified that interaction designers tend to use a
> "large internal sound palette" when describing experiences..
> (imagine the zzzzt! of an accordion pane closing)
>
> also - at chi last year there was a sonic interaction design
> workshop (didn't go sorry) but there seems to be a wiki with papers
> here
>
> http://www.cost-sid.org/wiki/CHIprogram
>
> and there seems to be a working group looking at the "Perceptual,
> cognitive, and emotional study of sonic interactions"
>
> "The activity focuses on extending information and valuable
> resources (including bibliography, guidelines, methods, and
> workbenches) on experimental scientific findings about human sound
> reception in interactive contexts. Research on new experimental
> paradigms such as neurosciences, ergonomical and psycholinguistic
> studies will be a stimulating challenge. Basic research will be
> included as well in these activities, promoting paper publication and
> dissemination."
>
> sounds pretty heavy... but could be fruitful.
>
> ohyeah - @Anya, I'd be super keen to try out the auditory menu in
> vancouver!
>
> ok - back to the sound of people's feet sticking to the asphalt.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=37669
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

29 Jan 2009 - 12:19pm
Graeme Coleman
2009

It's nice to hear someone else who is interested in this area -
having spent several years of my life doing a PhD thesis on sound, I
have a lot to say on the subject, so I'll keep it brief!

Personally, I don't believe sound design, as a discipline, gets the
recognition it deserves. From my experience, traditional sound
design, particularly within human-computer interaction, is less of a
"design" discipline and more of a technical one, rooted in
perception or task-driven concerns. This means that, at best,
adopting a "sound design" stance in HCI has resulted in
usability-enhancing/interface-centric projects (e.g. "does it take
the user longer to do a particular task using an earcon (abstract
sound) or an auditory icon ("real world" sound, e.g. trashcan
emptying), and why?") or, at worst, the treatment of sound as an
"add-on"; something that can be done by a friend-of-a-friend who
owns a copy of Audacity, the end result being an incongruent mess
where sound and vision don't match (I don't count HCI researchers
within the latter though!).

To me, while I have no objection to the plethora of research
investigating the use of sound within the interface, I believe
"sound designers" could (should?) offer more within interaction
design. To me, it's all about looking at where we are in terms of
technology development. 10 - 20 years ago, when there was more of a
focus on task-driven concerns, the usability model of sound design
made more sense, and I've certainly learned a lot about it. However,
as technology increasingly becomes "new media", where the emphasis
is less on the user completing tasks, this model becomes a little
more outdated. So, we may ask questions such as: can we improve the
"experience" of a particular technology (whether it be on our
desktops, on a mobile device, a particular environment) through
sound, without ignoring the other interactive aspects of the system?
What can we learn from other, more established, fields, such as
films, theatre, or computer games? The latter field is possibly one
of the few examples of interactive media in which sound design is an
artform in itself, and not just as a means of adding a few beeps to
menu items. Do we encourage computer game sound designers to get
involved in interaction design? How can we raise the importance of
"good" sound design? Where is sound design useful within
interaction design? Do we involve users (or other "non-sound
professionals") within the sound design process? If we do, what
methods can we use to get them to think/talk about sound, to evaluate
sound, and so on? How do we encourage a greater understanding of the
links between sound design and design as a whole? Should we
incorporate sound design into academic design courses?

So...I guess what I'm trying to say that (a) sound is
under-represented within interaction design, (b) there are more
questions than answers in terms of how it can be encouraged, and (c)
this makes it a very exciting field to work in. Join me in my
journey...

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=37669

30 Jan 2009 - 4:19pm
Anonymous

I'm game, count me in!

: )

>
> (a) sound is under-represented within interaction design, (b) there
> are more
> questions than answers in terms of how it can be encouraged, and (c)
> this makes it a very exciting field to work in. Join me in my
> journey...
>

Leonardo Parra Agudelo
Full Time Faculty
Design Department
Architecture and Design School
Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá-Colombia [57-1]-3394949 xt 3268

30 Jan 2009 - 4:28pm
Anonymous

A rather frugal website.

On Jan 29, 2009, at 2:35 PM, Angel Marquez wrote:

> http://www.bazooie.com/

Leonardo Parra Agudelo
lparra at uniandes.edu.co
Full Time Faculty
Design Department
Architecture and Design School
Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá-Colombia [57-1]-3394949 xt 3268

30 Jan 2009 - 4:44pm
Angel Marquez
2008

yea, it's been like that since 2003. i think bazo got married.
it's funny you say that though. when people send me some link to a polished
design it really turns me off. i would never buy anything from a site that
had beveled buttons.

A developer just sent me a link for that browser...something -alon. and i
did the title to fave.ico, scroll to bottom scan and asked...what is this?
My only clue was it had something to do with athletics because of the -alon
in the name. He said it's a browser. I'm thinking to myself, why the hell
would I want another browser to comply to AND why did I not think like that
when I willing and excitedly downloaded chrome. I said I will never use this
EVER don't waste my time with this canned grunge. It was another slick
marketing tool I could do without. It did turn out to be the browser for the
olympics, why do we need a browser for the olympics is beyond me. But we
have one and if someone likes using it good for them.

>>A rather frugal website.
I'm not sure what that implies. I was referencing him because of your
interest in sound.

As for the frugalness of sites. I never give just anyone the real deal. I
give them enough to gauge them and see how they respond to not getting
exactly what they think they want or need because I know that is what our
time spent together is really going to be all about.

Cheers : )

On Fri, Jan 30, 2009 at 1:28 PM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo <
lparra at uniandes.edu.co> wrote:

>
> A rather frugal website.
>
>
>
> On Jan 29, 2009, at 2:35 PM, Angel Marquez wrote:
>
> http://www.bazooie.com/
>
>
> Leonardo Parra Agudelo
> lparra at uniandes.edu.co
> Full Time Faculty
> Design Department
> Architecture and Design School
> Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá-Colombia [57-1]-3394949 xt 3268
>
>
>
>
>

30 Jan 2009 - 4:48pm
Anonymous

I was thinking that maybe "sound design" might not be the right way
to call it, since it can be directly associated with film, if I'm not
mistaken, it was Ben Burtt and Walter Murch who came up with the
"sound design" term. And they work within the film industry.
I know looking for terms can get yourself in a painful loop, but
still, the question remains; question which also needs to be
addressed within the realms where sound could/should be meaningful,
making it even harder to find an adequate word (or combination of
words) for it.

> traditional sound design, particularly within human-computer
> interaction, is less of a
> "design" discipline and more of a technical one, rooted in
> perception or task-driven concerns. This means that, at best,
> adopting a "sound design" stance in HCI has resulted in
> usability-enhancing/interface-centric projects (e.g. "does it take
> the user longer to do a particular task using an earcon (abstract
> sound) or an auditory icon ("real world" sound, e.g. trashcan
> emptying), and why?") or, at worst, the treatment of sound as an
> "add-on"; something that can be done by a friend-of-a-friend who
> owns a copy of Audacity, the end result being an incongruent mess
> where sound and vision don't match (I don't count HCI researchers
> within the latter though!).
>

Leonardo Parra Agudelo
Full Time Faculty
Design Department
Architecture and Design School
Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá-Colombia [57-1]-3394949 xt 3268

30 Jan 2009 - 4:58pm
Angel Marquez
2008

Silence is golden. Leave it without a name. I've had plenty of people in
other languages not know how to convey their feeling in English (My one and
only tongue). They always get that look in their eyes and say what I want to
tell you I don't know the English equivalent for the word or phrase or their
is none. I think I like not knowing the English word rather than if they
said you make me feel R.E.D...
You know what I mean?

No pain, no gain.

I think I'm not struggling with it because I know the answer and find when
the need to explain something exceeds a certain limit it's worth to me is
minimal. I want you to find your answer though and would even enjoy hearing
what you agreed is the proper name. I might never call it that or give it
different name!

Good luck!

On Fri, Jan 30, 2009 at 1:48 PM, Leonardo Parra Agudelo <
lparra at uniandes.edu.co> wrote:

>
> I was thinking that maybe "sound design" might not be the right way to call
> it, since it can be directly associated with film, if I'm not mistaken, it
> was Ben Burtt and Walter Murch who came up with the "sound design" term.
> And they work within the film industry.
> I know looking for terms can get yourself in a painful loop, but still, the
> question remains; question which also needs to be addressed within the
> realms where sound could/should be meaningful, making it even harder to find
> an adequate word (or combination of words) for it.
>
>
> traditional sound design, particularly within human-computer interaction,
>> is less of a
>> "design" discipline and more of a technical one, rooted in
>> perception or task-driven concerns. This means that, at best,
>> adopting a "sound design" stance in HCI has resulted in
>> usability-enhancing/interface-centric projects (e.g. "does it take
>> the user longer to do a particular task using an earcon (abstract
>> sound) or an auditory icon ("real world" sound, e.g. trashcan
>> emptying), and why?") or, at worst, the treatment of sound as an
>> "add-on"; something that can be done by a friend-of-a-friend who
>> owns a copy of Audacity, the end result being an incongruent mess
>> where sound and vision don't match (I don't count HCI researchers
>> within the latter though!).
>>
>>
> Leonardo Parra Agudelo
> Full Time Faculty
> Design Department
> Architecture and Design School
> Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá-Colombia [57-1]-3394949 xt 3268
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

30 Jan 2009 - 4:58pm
Jim Leftwich
2004

David Malouf writes:

Q:
Like Jonas I have another question regarding education. When you
speak of "junior designers" have these designers been through at
least a formal bachelor design education like yourself? Are there
things that designers should look for in that formal education, such
as strong foundation skills.

A:
Some, but not all. One was educated as a traditional architect and
picked things up brilliantly. Some have come from writing and film
back grounds and have similarly been adept at learning how to design
and document interactive products and software. Where these
individuals are likely to differ from someone with a more formal
design education might be their ability to pursue or address issues
beyond simply the interactional aspects. Such as (for example)
branding and graphic design, or development of physical models (for
physical user interfaces), or other design skills and knowledge that
could be introduced in a formal design education.

I think that the kind of solid design education that you are talking
about is incredibly valuable.

Q:
Lastly, when you review portfolios to understand the potential of a
junior designer (future apprentice) what are the clues in that
portfolio that highlight their potential.

A:
I'd look for several things, including what they might have done
previously (documented work, particulary in the area of documented
interaction). I'd interview them about roles they might have played
on teams, and ideas they might've wanted to try but were not allowed
to or unsuccessful in pursuing.

A candidate's deeper background is also very helpful in
understanding why they may be seeking to work in particular ways.
Some designers I've met will show an enormous range and number of
things they've done, all in creative areas. Those designers are
proving that they have broadly applicable creative and thinking
skills, so that's a plus.

A knowledge and familiarity with the field, and larger development
history is also valuable. And a lot of time with a new candidate or
teammember is simply discussion, rather than a Q and A grilling
session. The kinds of people we look for to work with aren't being
sought to fill a formally-described slot. We're looking for a
flexible associate with potential to contribute in a variety of ways
and grow as we also continue to learn and grow ourselves.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=37669

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