Nokia pulls out of Japan without notice, and possibly iPhone ?

4 Jan 2009 - 9:35pm
5 years ago
9 replies
804 reads
Jarod Tang
2007

There's a interesting link
http://www.engadget.com/2008/11/27/nokia-pulls-out-of-japan-nobody-notices/,
the the comment are especially interesting ,

* "Japanese like phones that are fashionable, and aluminum bricks
don't cut it"
* "only recently switched to an iPhone. Talk about culture shock!
I suddenly felt excluded from my friends in terms of email, and I
simply can't access any of the standard cell phone sites."
* "They have robust devices packed with features that double as
fashion accessories. "
* "I believe that the main problem of Nokia is, that Japanese use
only flip phones (clamshell phones) and that's something Nokia is
really bad at."
* "You see, from a European perspective, Japanese phones are crap."
* ". Many Japanese who have an iPhone also carry their "real"
phone to use 1seg - camera calls take video/photos etc .. and .. oh
yeah copy and paste ."

>From the sales news on iPhone, it seems reflect that it's sold not so
good in japan. Could forks from japan give the explanation from
design's perspective?

Regards,
Jarod
--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

Comments

5 Jan 2009 - 3:46am
spaolantonio
2008

From Tokyo perspective things are also not so clear.

In Japan (closed market) there are 12 (14?) handsets manifacturing competing for a 110 milions users market.
Sony, Panasonic, Nec, Hitachi, Casio, Kyocera, Sharp...
One issue is the competition here.

Features are so tailed for this market that is very difficult to have a "mobile" for all!.
Nokia strategy didnt work really well here.

BTW, about Iphone thoughs:
1) In Japan Operators and phones are linked together
2) Softbank (Operator)`s Iphone contract is VERY expensive compared to other phones-contracts.
3) Other phones presents uniques features such as 1seg TV (Usefull for 1.5h daily commuting time on trains)
4) IC card - Paying system integrated in the phone (Digital wallet) you can buy drinks and food everywhere. (shops and vending machines)
5) 1 design fit all doesnt always apply (color / customization)
6) Japanese ladies love VERY LONG Nails :-)
7) 1 size fit all cant work well here... check hands size
7) Cameras lenses and resolutions (here 8mega cameraphones)
8) Movie features
9) Cut n Paste :-)
10) Japanese cute emoticons (Cuteness is deep ruted here)
11) Japanese prediction not as accurate as the japanese handsets (This is what Iev been told about it)
12) Apple care-shop in Tokyo is -by far- lower quality compared to the others makers
13) Previous services offered by the manifacturing company. Es Panasonic offer online servives accesible only via Panasonic handsets....

Regards,
Sergio
Interaction Designer
Panasonic - Japan

4 Jan 2009 - 10:51pm
Jerome Ryckborst
2007

Nokia's low market share in Japan is bound to have compound causes. I wonder
whether "unfamiliar" or "indecipherable" icons were one of the reasons Nokia
didn't do well in Japan?
I remember seeing a research poster at the 2005 UPA conference in
Montreal that compared how well research participants in China, North
America, and Japan performed at predicting or identifying the functions of
over a dozen icons. The icons were from a particular maker of mobile phones
but I don't remember which one. Participants in China and USA performed
well. Japanese participants were "worse" than those in China and USA.
I asked the Japan-based researcher about her findings, and she
said lower recognition in Japan may have been because many phones in Japan
use different icons from the rest of the world -- I think* she said early
Japanese mobile phones used a set of icons unique to Japan. *There were
some language barriers.
I remember the gap between Japan and the other two countries being
about 10%, but remember that this was 3½ years ago. Anyway, that's the power
of first experiences and being first to market. Customers may not understand
10% of the designs from late(r) entrants.

------
Jerome Ryckborst, CUA, UPA member | Tel +1.604.689.1253
------

6 Jan 2009 - 7:38am
Jarod Tang
2007

Hi Jerome,

Thanks for your information.

I study the Japaneses market for some design project reasons. And some
interesting information sticks me very much
1. Nokia has a japan mobile rd office for long time, this means that
they really know this market, if they dont want to change, maybe
because the think the roi (caused by the constant competition ) is not
as good as other market, e.g. u.s market, or china (it's extreme
successful here)
2. for the first 2 months, iphone sold very well in japan, this seems
caused by apple brand and iPod's popular there, but it soon drops very
fast from the third month. this is a interesting phenomenon, that
Japaneses mobile users are open, but they use the mobile phone much
more heavier than other area, if it lacks something, it's really
affect their life, and they'll go back to the more fitted solution
3. Japaneses is hard to input, so they firstly introduce Emoji, then
it evolute as a cute way to express between close friends, this is not
so obvious on other market ( even Chinese market )
4, Japaneses mobile users seems more flexible than other market, cause
they change the keitai by half year base, this is faster than other
area
5, they love clean and cute phones, while they claim for features,
this is a paradox, which may kill the none japaness mobile designs,

More to be found.

Regards,
Jarod

On Mon, Jan 5, 2009 at 11:51 AM, Jerome Ryckborst <j3rom3 at gmail.com> wrote:
> Nokia's low market share in Japan is bound to have compound causes. I wonder
> whether "unfamiliar" or "indecipherable" icons were one of the reasons Nokia
> didn't do well in Japan?
> I remember seeing a research poster at the 2005 UPA conference in
> Montreal that compared how well research participants in China, North
> America, and Japan performed at predicting or identifying the functions of
> over a dozen icons. The icons were from a particular maker of mobile phones
> but I don't remember which one. Participants in China and USA performed
> well. Japanese participants were "worse" than those in China and USA.
> I asked the Japan-based researcher about her findings, and she
> said lower recognition in Japan may have been because many phones in Japan
> use different icons from the rest of the world -- I think* she said early
> Japanese mobile phones used a set of icons unique to Japan. *There were
> some language barriers.
> I remember the gap between Japan and the other two countries being
> about 10%, but remember that this was 3½ years ago. Anyway, that's the power
> of first experiences and being first to market. Customers may not understand
> 10% of the designs from late(r) entrants.
>
> ------
> Jerome Ryckborst, CUA, UPA member | Tel +1.604.689.1253
> ------
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

6 Jan 2009 - 7:45am
SemanticWill
2007

Interesting development,given that Nokia's design ethnographer, Jan
Chipchase, lives in Tokyo:
http://www.janchipchase.com/

He presented a few months back at IxDA NYC.

~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Jan 6, 2009, at 7:38 AM, Jarod Tang wrote:

> Hi Jerome,
>
> Thanks for your information.
>
> I study the Japaneses market for some design project reasons. And some
> interesting information sticks me very much
> 1. Nokia has a japan mobile rd office for long time, this means that
> they really know this market, if they dont want to change, maybe
> because the think the roi (caused by the constant competition ) is not
> as good as other market, e.g. u.s market, or china (it's extreme
> successful here)
> 2. for the first 2 months, iphone sold very well in japan, this seems
> caused by apple brand and iPod's popular there, but it soon drops very
> fast from the third month. this is a interesting phenomenon, that
> Japaneses mobile users are open, but they use the mobile phone much
> more heavier than other area, if it lacks something, it's really
> affect their life, and they'll go back to the more fitted solution
> 3. Japaneses is hard to input, so they firstly introduce Emoji, then
> it evolute as a cute way to express between close friends, this is not
> so obvious on other market ( even Chinese market )
> 4, Japaneses mobile users seems more flexible than other market, cause
> they change the keitai by half year base, this is faster than other
> area
> 5, they love clean and cute phones, while they claim for features,
> this is a paradox, which may kill the none japaness mobile designs,
>
> More to be found.
>
> Regards,
> Jarod
>
> On Mon, Jan 5, 2009 at 11:51 AM, Jerome Ryckborst <j3rom3 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>> Nokia's low market share in Japan is bound to have compound causes.
>> I wonder
>> whether "unfamiliar" or "indecipherable" icons were one of the
>> reasons Nokia
>> didn't do well in Japan?
>> I remember seeing a research poster at the 2005 UPA
>> conference in
>> Montreal that compared how well research participants in China, North
>> America, and Japan performed at predicting or identifying the
>> functions of
>> over a dozen icons. The icons were from a particular maker of
>> mobile phones
>> but I don't remember which one. Participants in China and USA
>> performed
>> well. Japanese participants were "worse" than those in China and USA.
>> I asked the Japan-based researcher about her findings, and
>> she
>> said lower recognition in Japan may have been because many phones
>> in Japan
>> use different icons from the rest of the world -- I think* she said
>> early
>> Japanese mobile phones used a set of icons unique to Japan. *There
>> were
>> some language barriers.
>> I remember the gap between Japan and the other two
>> countries being
>> about 10%, but remember that this was 3½ years ago. Anyway, that's
>> the power
>> of first experiences and being first to market. Customers may not
>> understand
>> 10% of the designs from late(r) entrants.
>>
>> ------
>> Jerome Ryckborst, CUA, UPA member | Tel +1.604.689.1253
>> ------
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
>
>
> --
> http://designforuse.blogspot.com/
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

6 Jan 2009 - 8:03am
Jarod Tang
2007

Hi Will,

Thanks for the link.
I subscribe his blog for sometime, which also makes me more confusing.

Jarod

On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 8:45 PM, Will Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
> Interesting development,given that Nokia's design ethnographer, Jan
> Chipchase, lives in Tokyo:
> http://www.janchipchase.com/
> He presented a few months back at IxDA NYC.
>
> ~ will
> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> and what you innovate are design problems"
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Will Evans | User Experience Architect
> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
> aim: semanticwill
> gtalk: semanticwill
> twitter: semanticwill
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> On Jan 6, 2009, at 7:38 AM, Jarod Tang wrote:
>
> Hi Jerome,
>
> Thanks for your information.
>
> I study the Japaneses market for some design project reasons. And some
> interesting information sticks me very much
> 1. Nokia has a japan mobile rd office for long time, this means that
> they really know this market, if they dont want to change, maybe
> because the think the roi (caused by the constant competition ) is not
> as good as other market, e.g. u.s market, or china (it's extreme
> successful here)
> 2. for the first 2 months, iphone sold very well in japan, this seems
> caused by apple brand and iPod's popular there, but it soon drops very
> fast from the third month. this is a interesting phenomenon, that
> Japaneses mobile users are open, but they use the mobile phone much
> more heavier than other area, if it lacks something, it's really
> affect their life, and they'll go back to the more fitted solution
> 3. Japaneses is hard to input, so they firstly introduce Emoji, then
> it evolute as a cute way to express between close friends, this is not
> so obvious on other market ( even Chinese market )
> 4, Japaneses mobile users seems more flexible than other market, cause
> they change the keitai by half year base, this is faster than other
> area
> 5, they love clean and cute phones, while they claim for features,
> this is a paradox, which may kill the none japaness mobile designs,
>
> More to be found.
>
> Regards,
> Jarod
>
> On Mon, Jan 5, 2009 at 11:51 AM, Jerome Ryckborst <j3rom3 at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Nokia's low market share in Japan is bound to have compound causes. I wonder
>
> whether "unfamiliar" or "indecipherable" icons were one of the reasons Nokia
>
> didn't do well in Japan?
>
> I remember seeing a research poster at the 2005 UPA conference in
>
> Montreal that compared how well research participants in China, North
>
> America, and Japan performed at predicting or identifying the functions of
>
> over a dozen icons. The icons were from a particular maker of mobile phones
>
> but I don't remember which one. Participants in China and USA performed
>
> well. Japanese participants were "worse" than those in China and USA.
>
> I asked the Japan-based researcher about her findings, and she
>
> said lower recognition in Japan may have been because many phones in Japan
>
> use different icons from the rest of the world -- I think* she said early
>
> Japanese mobile phones used a set of icons unique to Japan. *There were
>
> some language barriers.
>
> I remember the gap between Japan and the other two countries being
>
> about 10%, but remember that this was 3½ years ago. Anyway, that's the power
>
> of first experiences and being first to market. Customers may not understand
>
> 10% of the designs from late(r) entrants.
>
> ------
>
> Jerome Ryckborst, CUA, UPA member | Tel +1.604.689.1253
>
> ------
>
> ________________________________________________________________
>
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>
>
>
> --
> http://designforuse.blogspot.com/
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>

--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

6 Jan 2009 - 9:59pm
Jarod Tang
2007

Hi Hitoshi Enjoji,

Great appreciate your information, it DOES help a lot.
On the web, i find some pages, like
http://rion.nu/v5/archive/000920.php, which gives feeling on Keitai in
Japaneses everyday life. Are there some place to locate more
information like this?

Thanks,
Jarod

On Wed, Jan 7, 2009 at 9:20 AM, Hitoshi Enjoji <enjoji at gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi Jarod,
>
> I'm Japanese user experience architect living in Tokyo. My opinion may
> be helpful for you.
>
> In Japan there are lots of original mobile web contents serviced by
> mobile network operators such as NTT docomo, Softbank mobile, and au.
> These mobile web contents are closed only for respective mobile
> operator. Ordinary web browser such as IE and Safari cannot access to
> the mobile contents. Only browsers which follow guideline provided by
> those mobile network operators can access the contents. iPhone and
> some Nokia's phone cannot access these mobile web contents and these
> users have to give up using domestic mobile web contents.
>
> Mobile phone are used in commuter train. Many people enjoy text
> messaging till they arrive the destination. In the situation users
> have to handle the phone by one hand. I'm not iPhone user so this is
> not true, but iPhone requires two hand inputs. I think Japanese more
> frequently use text messaging than mere calling. Phones which is not
> manipulable by one hand are stressful.
>
> Related to text messaging, Emoji (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emoji)
> is really important for Japanese text messaging, especially for
> teenagers. Mere text sentences are not sufficient to communicate their
> feeling. Emoticon sometimes looks techie. Receivers who are not good
> at technology do not care about iPhone and Nokia phone cannot use
> Emoji, so iPhone users may give blunt impression to message receivers.
>
> regards,
> Hitoshi Enjoji
>
>
> On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 10:03 PM, Jarod Tang <jarod.tang at gmail.com> wrote:
>> Hi Will,
>>
>> Thanks for the link.
>> I subscribe his blog for sometime, which also makes me more confusing.
>>
>> Jarod
>>
>> On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 8:45 PM, Will Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Interesting development,given that Nokia's design ethnographer, Jan
>>> Chipchase, lives in Tokyo:
>>> http://www.janchipchase.com/
>>> He presented a few months back at IxDA NYC.
>>>
>>> ~ will
>>> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
>>> and what you innovate are design problems"
>>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>> Will Evans | User Experience Architect
>>> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
>>> http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
>>> aim: semanticwill
>>> gtalk: semanticwill
>>> twitter: semanticwill
>>> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>
>>>
>>> On Jan 6, 2009, at 7:38 AM, Jarod Tang wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Jerome,
>>>
>>> Thanks for your information.
>>>
>>> I study the Japaneses market for some design project reasons. And some
>>> interesting information sticks me very much
>>> 1. Nokia has a japan mobile rd office for long time, this means that
>>> they really know this market, if they dont want to change, maybe
>>> because the think the roi (caused by the constant competition ) is not
>>> as good as other market, e.g. u.s market, or china (it's extreme
>>> successful here)
>>> 2. for the first 2 months, iphone sold very well in japan, this seems
>>> caused by apple brand and iPod's popular there, but it soon drops very
>>> fast from the third month. this is a interesting phenomenon, that
>>> Japaneses mobile users are open, but they use the mobile phone much
>>> more heavier than other area, if it lacks something, it's really
>>> affect their life, and they'll go back to the more fitted solution
>>> 3. Japaneses is hard to input, so they firstly introduce Emoji, then
>>> it evolute as a cute way to express between close friends, this is not
>>> so obvious on other market ( even Chinese market )
>>> 4, Japaneses mobile users seems more flexible than other market, cause
>>> they change the keitai by half year base, this is faster than other
>>> area
>>> 5, they love clean and cute phones, while they claim for features,
>>> this is a paradox, which may kill the none japaness mobile designs,
>>>
>>> More to be found.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Jarod
>>>
>>> On Mon, Jan 5, 2009 at 11:51 AM, Jerome Ryckborst <j3rom3 at gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Nokia's low market share in Japan is bound to have compound causes. I wonder
>>>
>>> whether "unfamiliar" or "indecipherable" icons were one of the reasons Nokia
>>>
>>> didn't do well in Japan?
>>>
>>> I remember seeing a research poster at the 2005 UPA conference in
>>>
>>> Montreal that compared how well research participants in China, North
>>>
>>> America, and Japan performed at predicting or identifying the functions of
>>>
>>> over a dozen icons. The icons were from a particular maker of mobile phones
>>>
>>> but I don't remember which one. Participants in China and USA performed
>>>
>>> well. Japanese participants were "worse" than those in China and USA.
>>>
>>> I asked the Japan-based researcher about her findings, and she
>>>
>>> said lower recognition in Japan may have been because many phones in Japan
>>>
>>> use different icons from the rest of the world -- I think* she said early
>>>
>>> Japanese mobile phones used a set of icons unique to Japan. *There were
>>>
>>> some language barriers.
>>>
>>> I remember the gap between Japan and the other two countries being
>>>
>>> about 10%, but remember that this was 3½ years ago. Anyway, that's the power
>>>
>>> of first experiences and being first to market. Customers may not understand
>>>
>>> 10% of the designs from late(r) entrants.
>>>
>>> ------
>>>
>>> Jerome Ryckborst, CUA, UPA member | Tel +1.604.689.1253
>>>
>>> ------
>>>
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>>
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>>
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>>
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>>>
>>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> http://designforuse.blogspot.com/
>>> ________________________________________________________________
>>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> http://designforuse.blogspot.com/
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>

--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

6 Jan 2009 - 10:18pm
Chan FoongYeen
2008

Hi,

Great information. It is really important for a user behavior and their
culture in using the technology. Nokia has overlook this or too confident on
their product that they can change a culture?

I did a quick survey and found more about the Japanese mobile phone culture.
Attached is a paper explaining more about the development of mobile phone
culture in Japan. You can also click of the links to read more about
Japanese mobile culture and users.

- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_mobile_phone_culture
- *ISEA2004: Japanese mobile phone culture and urban life · 2004-08-19
13:44 --- *
http://antimega.textdriven.com/antimega/2004/08/19/isea2004-japanese-mobile-phone-culture-and-urban-life

For those who are interested in venturing into Japan mobile market might
want to read content
Personal, Portable, Pedestrian: Mobile Phones in Japanese Life (Hardcover)
---
http://www.amazon.com/Personal-Portable-Pedestrian-Mobile-Japanese/dp/0262090392
*An Intensive Survey of 3G Mobile Phone Technologies and Applications in
Japan*
Kazuaki Yamauchi; Wenxi Chen; Daming Wei
Computer and Information Technology, 2006. CIT apos;06. The Sixth IEEE
International Conference on
Volume , Issue , Sept. 2006 Page(s):265 - 265
Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/CIT.2006.49

regards,
Donny CHAN

On Wed, Jan 7, 2009 at 10:59 AM, Jarod Tang <jarod.tang at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi Hitoshi Enjoji,
>
> Great appreciate your information, it DOES help a lot.
> On the web, i find some pages, like
> http://rion.nu/v5/archive/000920.php, which gives feeling on Keitai in
> Japaneses everyday life. Are there some place to locate more
> information like this?
>
> Thanks,
> Jarod
>
> On Wed, Jan 7, 2009 at 9:20 AM, Hitoshi Enjoji <enjoji at gmail.com> wrote:
> > Hi Jarod,
> >
> > I'm Japanese user experience architect living in Tokyo. My opinion may
> > be helpful for you.
> >
> > In Japan there are lots of original mobile web contents serviced by
> > mobile network operators such as NTT docomo, Softbank mobile, and au.
> > These mobile web contents are closed only for respective mobile
> > operator. Ordinary web browser such as IE and Safari cannot access to
> > the mobile contents. Only browsers which follow guideline provided by
> > those mobile network operators can access the contents. iPhone and
> > some Nokia's phone cannot access these mobile web contents and these
> > users have to give up using domestic mobile web contents.
> >
> > Mobile phone are used in commuter train. Many people enjoy text
> > messaging till they arrive the destination. In the situation users
> > have to handle the phone by one hand. I'm not iPhone user so this is
> > not true, but iPhone requires two hand inputs. I think Japanese more
> > frequently use text messaging than mere calling. Phones which is not
> > manipulable by one hand are stressful.
> >
> > Related to text messaging, Emoji (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emoji)
> > is really important for Japanese text messaging, especially for
> > teenagers. Mere text sentences are not sufficient to communicate their
> > feeling. Emoticon sometimes looks techie. Receivers who are not good
> > at technology do not care about iPhone and Nokia phone cannot use
> > Emoji, so iPhone users may give blunt impression to message receivers.
> >
> > regards,
> > Hitoshi Enjoji
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 10:03 PM, Jarod Tang <jarod.tang at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >> Hi Will,
> >>
> >> Thanks for the link.
> >> I subscribe his blog for sometime, which also makes me more confusing.
> >>
> >> Jarod
> >>
> >> On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 8:45 PM, Will Evans <wkevans4 at gmail.com> wrote:
> >>> Interesting development,given that Nokia's design ethnographer, Jan
> >>> Chipchase, lives in Tokyo:
> >>> http://www.janchipchase.com/
> >>> He presented a few months back at IxDA NYC.
> >>>
> >>> ~ will
> >>> "Where you innovate, how you innovate,
> >>> and what you innovate are design problems"
> >>>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>> Will Evans | User Experience Architect
> >>> tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
> >>> http://blog.semanticfoundry.com
> >>> aim: semanticwill
> >>> gtalk: semanticwill
> >>> twitter: semanticwill
> >>>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> On Jan 6, 2009, at 7:38 AM, Jarod Tang wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Hi Jerome,
> >>>
> >>> Thanks for your information.
> >>>
> >>> I study the Japaneses market for some design project reasons. And some
> >>> interesting information sticks me very much
> >>> 1. Nokia has a japan mobile rd office for long time, this means that
> >>> they really know this market, if they dont want to change, maybe
> >>> because the think the roi (caused by the constant competition ) is not
> >>> as good as other market, e.g. u.s market, or china (it's extreme
> >>> successful here)
> >>> 2. for the first 2 months, iphone sold very well in japan, this seems
> >>> caused by apple brand and iPod's popular there, but it soon drops very
> >>> fast from the third month. this is a interesting phenomenon, that
> >>> Japaneses mobile users are open, but they use the mobile phone much
> >>> more heavier than other area, if it lacks something, it's really
> >>> affect their life, and they'll go back to the more fitted solution
> >>> 3. Japaneses is hard to input, so they firstly introduce Emoji, then
> >>> it evolute as a cute way to express between close friends, this is not
> >>> so obvious on other market ( even Chinese market )
> >>> 4, Japaneses mobile users seems more flexible than other market, cause
> >>> they change the keitai by half year base, this is faster than other
> >>> area
> >>> 5, they love clean and cute phones, while they claim for features,
> >>> this is a paradox, which may kill the none japaness mobile designs,
> >>>
> >>> More to be found.
> >>>
> >>> Regards,
> >>> Jarod
> >>>
> >>> On Mon, Jan 5, 2009 at 11:51 AM, Jerome Ryckborst <j3rom3 at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Nokia's low market share in Japan is bound to have compound causes. I
> wonder
> >>>
> >>> whether "unfamiliar" or "indecipherable" icons were one of the reasons
> Nokia
> >>>
> >>> didn't do well in Japan?
> >>>
> >>> I remember seeing a research poster at the 2005 UPA conference
> in
> >>>
> >>> Montreal that compared how well research participants in China, North
> >>>
> >>> America, and Japan performed at predicting or identifying the functions
> of
> >>>
> >>> over a dozen icons. The icons were from a particular maker of mobile
> phones
> >>>
> >>> but I don't remember which one. Participants in China and USA performed
> >>>
> >>> well. Japanese participants were "worse" than those in China and USA.
> >>>
> >>> I asked the Japan-based researcher about her findings, and she
> >>>
> >>> said lower recognition in Japan may have been because many phones in
> Japan
> >>>
> >>> use different icons from the rest of the world -- I think* she said
> early
> >>>
> >>> Japanese mobile phones used a set of icons unique to Japan. *There
> were
> >>>
> >>> some language barriers.
> >>>
> >>> I remember the gap between Japan and the other two countries
> being
> >>>
> >>> about 10%, but remember that this was 3½ years ago. Anyway, that's the
> power
> >>>
> >>> of first experiences and being first to market. Customers may not
> understand
> >>>
> >>> 10% of the designs from late(r) entrants.
> >>>
> >>> ------
> >>>
> >>> Jerome Ryckborst, CUA, UPA member | Tel +1.604.689.1253
> >>>
> >>> ------
> >>>
> >>> ________________________________________________________________
> >>>
> >>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >>>
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> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> http://designforuse.blogspot.com/
> >>> ________________________________________________________________
> >>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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> >>
> >>
> >>
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> >> http://designforuse.blogspot.com/
> >> ________________________________________________________________
> >> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> >> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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> --
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> ________________________________________________________________
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> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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6 Jan 2009 - 11:32pm
Jarod Tang
2007

Hi Chan

Great thanks for the information.

> Attached is a paper explaining more about the development of mobile phone
> culture in Japan. You can also click of the links to read more about
> Japanese mobile culture and users.
Thanks, i'm reading it now.

> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_mobile_phone_culture
> ISEA2004: Japanese mobile phone culture and urban life · 2004-08-19 13:44
Have read it for a while. A informative abstract on Japan
Keitai/Mobile phone culture.

> ---
> http://antimega.textdriven.com/antimega/2004/08/19/isea2004-japanese-mobile-phone-culture-and-urban-life
>
A very interesting link, thanks very much.

> For those who are interested in venturing into Japan mobile market might
> want to read content
>
> Personal, Portable, Pedestrian: Mobile Phones in Japanese Life (Hardcover)
> ---
> http://www.amazon.com/Personal-Portable-Pedestrian-Mobile-Japanese/dp/0262090392
>
Have ordered this for some time, it's on the road, :). And i also
spent some time on the authors related work on japan mobile media
research, it's pretty informative.

> An Intensive Survey of 3G Mobile Phone Technologies and Applications in
> Japan
> Kazuaki Yamauchi; Wenxi Chen; Daming Wei
> Computer and Information Technology, 2006. CIT apos;06. The Sixth IEEE
> International Conference on
> Volume , Issue , Sept. 2006 Page(s):265 - 265
> Digital Object Identifier 10.1109/CIT.2006.49
>
I'll get a copy of this, thanks very much.

Thanks,
Jarod
--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

6 Jan 2009 - 11:46pm
paul neervoort
2009

Apart from the 'obvious' usability and feature driven isues, there
are also other reasons why Japan is a difficult market. The latest
network standards in Japan (since 2G in fact) are different from most
of the US and Europe market where Nokia has no problem whatsoever.
Because there are relativley even spread market shares in Japan (at
least not a >50% Nokia as in most others) they will not sell high
numbers. So it means that can't leverage economy of scale on the
Japan market.
indeed the ROI is in htis case clearly the driving factor as with a
lot of Consumer Products the Market is closed in Japan and fighting
your way in is hard. If you can't make a deal with the providers it
is practically impossible.
Indeed I would not be surpised if Apple will bail out as well.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=36835

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