EULA checkbox variations

17 Dec 2008 - 6:53pm
6 years ago
1 reply
1092 reads
Tori Breitling
2007

Anybody done any testing, or have anecdotal evidence of the best way to
handle the EULA agreement on sign up?
Here are the options that I see:

1) Generally seen version, with checkbox that can produce errors.

| | I agree to the EULA

< Create My Account >

2) No checkbox, but longer button label.

By clicking the button below, I agree to the EULA.

< I Agree. Create My Account.>

3) No check box, with inferred agreement via prior text. Shorter button
label.

By clicking "Create My Account" below, I agree to the EULA.

< Create My Account>

I've been told by "someone who knows" that the 3rd option won't pass legal
muster. Assuming that's true, do you think version 1 or version 2 causes the
least friction?

Thanks,
Tori

Comments

17 Dec 2008 - 7:14pm
Christian Crumlish
2006

Depends on your legal musterers, I suppose. We got Yahoo lawyers to approve
option three for our terms of service agreements, and hope to publish the
pattern fairly soon. Here's the nut of our guidelines:

- Consent to the agreement is expressed in the call-to-action button
('Agree and Continue').
- The form offers an option to exit without agreeing ('Cancel' or 'Don't
Agree / Cancel Order').
- A statement makes clear that submitting the form constitutes agreement
to the terms ('By clicking you agree...').
- The terms of service (TOS) text is available via a clearly labeled
hypertext link (Terms of Service).
- The TOS copy is supplied in a printable format.

Here's the draft rationale (but don't treat it as an authoritative Yahoo
recommendation till we publish it):

The goal of this pattern is to make the experience of completing the form
better for the user and to avoid interrupting the user or making them feel
as though they have made an error.

Combining the agreement with the call-to-action button, and clearly labeling
the option offers a streamlined experience in the natural flow of filling
out the form. The experience is somewhat analogous to signing a document.

It is important to offer an option to exit (cancel) the form without making
the agreement, giving the user an escape hatch and making their consent to
the terms meaningful, given that they had an alternate choice available.

Linking to the TOS provides direct access to the legal copy but avoids
cluttering the page with either a large amount of verbiage or an embedded
texts box or iframe.

The language preceding the buttons clearly explains that clicking means
agreeing, so the legal force of the agreement is clear.

Offering a printable TOS is a best practice that enables the user to keep a
copy of what they agreed to (or show it to a legal expert before agreeing).

These five elements of the pattern work in tandem. Removing any one defeats
the purpose of the pattern.

Finally, this pattern represents a best practice in the industry, seen in
use by companies for whom check-out flows are core experiences (such as
PayPal).

On Wed, Dec 17, 2008 at 4:53 PM, Tori Breitling <tori.breitling at gmail.com>wrote:

> Anybody done any testing, or have anecdotal evidence of the best way to
> handle the EULA agreement on sign up?
> Here are the options that I see:
>
> 1) Generally seen version, with checkbox that can produce errors.
>
> | | I agree to the EULA
>
> < Create My Account >
>
> 2) No checkbox, but longer button label.
>
> By clicking the button below, I agree to the EULA.
>
> < I Agree. Create My Account.>
>
> 3) No check box, with inferred agreement via prior text. Shorter button
> label.
>
> By clicking "Create My Account" below, I agree to the EULA.
>
> < Create My Account>
>
>
> I've been told by "someone who knows" that the 3rd option won't pass legal
> muster. Assuming that's true, do you think version 1 or version 2 causes
> the
> least friction?
>
> Thanks,
> Tori
> ________________________________________________________________
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--
Christian Crumlish http://xianlandia.com
Designing Social Interfaces
http://designingsocialinterfaces.com/patterns.wiki
Yahoo! pattern detective http://design.yahoo.com
Yahoo! Developer Network evangelist http://open.yahoo.com
IA Institute treasurer http://iainstitute.org

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