Favorite projects // companies

9 Nov 2004 - 8:15pm
9 years ago
2 replies
290 reads
Daniel Harvey
2004

Often we talk about the nuts and bolts of what we do in a very generalized sense but I'd like to get into some specifics. What are some of your favorite projects that you've worked on recently? What about historically? Why were they so engaging for you? Additionally, what are some of the favorite companies you've worked for and why? Is it client roster that you find appealing? Scale and scope of work?

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Daniel Harvey
http://www.invisiblerabbit.com

Comments

10 Nov 2004 - 10:29am
Josh Seiden
2003

> What are some of your favorite projects that
> you've worked on recently? What about historically?
Why were
> they so engaging for you? Additionally, what are some
of the
> favorite companies you've worked for and why? Is it
client
> roster that you find appealing? Scale and scope of
work?

Well, I was just thinking about this yesterday...

I just started a new engagement in the supply chain
management space. I like SCM, but only get to work in
this space occasionally, every few years or so. This
particular project is with a company building a desktop
application to manage a specific set of sourcing
activities.

Yesterday, during my second day of discovery meetings
with the client, we were discussing a portion of the
business process that they intend to support with the
new system. The complexity was staggering, the
relationships among the parts myriad, the
industry-specific vocabulary was archaic and filled
with odd poetry, and I found my joy nearly boundless. I
was literally laughing and grinning because the problem
space was so delightful.

Now, this may well be the honeymoon. It may be that
despite my delight in the problem space, there may be
insurmountable project obstacles that prevent us from
achieving a satisfying solution. So that's the next
issue: what's the working environment like, and does it
allow me to do good work?

For more on this last thought, I recommend highly
DeMarco and Lister's, "Peopleware," a wonderful book
about what drives software people (and others who think
for a living) and how to manage them.

JS

10 Nov 2004 - 4:48pm
Listera
2004

Joshua Seiden:

> The complexity was staggering, the relationships among the parts myriad, the
> industry-specific vocabulary was archaic and filled with odd poetry, and I
> found my joy nearly boundless. I was literally laughing and grinning because
> the problem space was so delightful.

Most excellent!
This is the sign of a good designer: chomping at the bits to solve a tough
problem.

Ziya
Nullius in Verba

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