What to choose? (technical writer or technical tester)

7 Nov 2008 - 5:05pm
5 years ago
24 replies
1591 reads
Ali Naqvi
2008

Hello members,
I recently graduated in user centered design and have been to a few job
interviews. It is almost impossible to get a job as a user experience
designer, interaction designer or a usability consultant since many of the
corporations here wants to hire someone with several years of experience.
NOKIA has promised me a job as a User Interface Designer since I wrote my
thesis with them, but that position is still not open. Whenever they have
an open position they will contact me, and this can take up to several
months.

I now have the option between choosing a technical writer position or a
technical tester position. Both positions contain cooperating with a user
experience group but does not allow me to be 'creative'. As a technical
writer you are given a document and you need to ensure that the
documentation is user friendly. In the technical tester position you test
a software using a test programme. (usability)

My aim is to work as an interaction designer or user experience analyst in
the future and therefore I would like to know what position of these two
would be wise to choose? As a recent graduate I dont have the real
corporate culture experience. So if any of you experienced veterans could
give me some advice I would be delighted.

Thanks

Ali

Comments

7 Nov 2008 - 6:33pm
david.shaw6@gma...
2004

Hi Ali,
I'll go ahead and bite. :-)

I did a stint as a Technical Writer, and feel that gave me great experience
for where I am now (senior interaction designer). There actually is quite a
bit of creativity in that role, definitely more than a tester position.
While the tester position would give you some insight into where the users
had issues, with where you want to go I would say you're better off going
the writer route. You'll learn much more about the design process.

Either way, get your feet wet and get some experience!

Best,
David

On Fri, Nov 7, 2008 at 2:05 PM, <ali at amroha.dk> wrote:

> Hello members,
> I recently graduated in user centered design and have been to a few job
> interviews. It is almost impossible to get a job as a user experience
> designer, interaction designer or a usability consultant since many of the
> corporations here wants to hire someone with several years of experience.
> NOKIA has promised me a job as a User Interface Designer since I wrote my
> thesis with them, but that position is still not open. Whenever they have
> an open position they will contact me, and this can take up to several
> months.
>
> I now have the option between choosing a technical writer position or a
> technical tester position. Both positions contain cooperating with a user
> experience group but does not allow me to be 'creative'. As a technical
> writer you are given a document and you need to ensure that the
> documentation is user friendly. In the technical tester position you test
> a software using a test programme. (usability)
>
> My aim is to work as an interaction designer or user experience analyst in
> the future and therefore I would like to know what position of these two
> would be wise to choose? As a recent graduate I dont have the real
> corporate culture experience. So if any of you experienced veterans could
> give me some advice I would be delighted.
>
> Thanks
>
> Ali
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
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> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
"Art provokes thinking, design solves problems"

w: http://www.davidshaw.info

7 Nov 2008 - 7:28pm
Elizabeth Bacon
2003

Hi Ali,

I'll second Dave's recommendation. Many IxD's I know & love
started their careers as technical writers. It *is* a role with
creative potential, at least visually if not content-wise. Most
especially, it offers the opportunity to analyze the form & behavior
of systems and ensure that the communication of their functionality,
at least, is as user-centered as possible. You might even find
opportunities to conduct usability testing of communication
materials, adding some of the same positives as in that alternate
role of technical tester.

Cheers,
Liz

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7 Nov 2008 - 7:46pm
Scott Berkun
2008

Hi Ali:

First off your situation is not unusual - lots of new graduates take first
first jobs that aren't in the role they want. It's a very smart move if it
gets you inside the right company, or project, since moving within a
company is always a zillion times easier than working from the outside.
In fact I did the same thing but the other way: I wanted to be a Program
Manager, but was only able to get hired as a usability engineer. I took
the job, and switched to the role I wanted in a year.

Here's my jaded opinion from 15 years of experience:

Test positions are often grueling: Test roles are often high pressure with
disproportionately small rewards (explaining high turnover rates). They
typically get way more blame than credit or power. If you were interested
in becoming an engineer I might say yes, but if you goal is design, stay
away from test. You will not be designing much of anything: as a newbie
you'll be running test plans made by others, verifying bug fixes, and
doing fairly technical things. Every organization is different, and some
test orgs are run well and treated great, but knowing nothing about yours
my opinion reflects the grand average. Unless you were guaranteed an
assignment that was purely testing UI components, don't go this way.

Technical Writing - go this way. No doubt. There is less pressure here,
which should create more opportunity to network and get a sense for how
things work at the company. You are at least creating things (though the
volume can make it hard to create with quality). Most tech writers are too
far downstream to suggest changes that could easily avoid the need for
tons of help/tech writing, which is often extremely frustrating. But on
the whole its a safe place to be. No product recalls or web outages occur
because of something a technical writer did. You will learn the
organization, get some experience out of college, etc.

Other notes:

1. You don't mention if all these jobs are at the same company, or on the
same project. If one job is in an organization/project with a much better
design team, or much stronger design goals, that would change my advice.
I'd be a tester at amazon.com, vs. tech writer at wehateusers.com, as at
the former there is a path in the org to eventually being on a team that
cares about design team, which is probably not true for the later. So if
these two jobs are two different projects/companies, keep that in mind.

2. You don't mention how technical you are. If you are not technical at
all, you might not even be qualified for the test position, which would
make this decision easier.

3. The challenge you didn't mention is how to express all this to your
first boss, and also how to nose around the design team to set yourself up
for a future job without annoying them. But that's another question.

Good luck!

-Scott

Scott Berkun
www.scottberkun.com

> Hello members,
> I recently graduated in user centered design and have been to a few job
> interviews. It is almost impossible to get a job as a user experience
> designer, interaction designer or a usability consultant since many of the
> corporations here wants to hire someone with several years of experience.
> NOKIA has promised me a job as a User Interface Designer since I wrote my
> thesis with them, but that position is still not open. Whenever they have
> an open position they will contact me, and this can take up to several
> months.
>
> I now have the option between choosing a technical writer position or a
> technical tester position. Both positions contain cooperating with a user
> experience group but does not allow me to be 'creative'. As a technical
> writer you are given a document and you need to ensure that the
> documentation is user friendly. In the technical tester position you test
> a software using a test programme. (usability)

8 Nov 2008 - 7:51am
Ali Naqvi
2008

Hello members,
thank you SO much for helping me out here. Your replies were all
indeed very helpful.

These positions are offered by two different companies. The tech
tester job is at the largest pension company here. With alot of
career opportunities. The tech writer job is at a company that is a
world leader in digital hearing aid manufacturing. Their user
experience group is small and they want to expand.

The tech writer job seems very close to my future dream job and the
tech tester job is better paid, BUT money is not an issue.

once again thanks!

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8 Nov 2008 - 1:02pm
erica
2008

Ali,

Lucky you, to have just graduated and both of those opportunities available.
I envy you :)

Here UXD/IA aren't too strong yet, so there are almost no direct
possibilities, and no local university programs that I'm aware of. That
said, I rather serendipitously accepted a Technical Writing job at a company
that doesn't yet have any UXD but can appreciate the value of usability. I
began with editing in one department, moved to writing in another, started
doing video tutorials for them, then began designing icons, graphics, and
the software interface itself. This after chatting with a business analyst
who was developing limited beta software they wanted to test before
revamping their existing giant products. Right place, right time, right
skill-set for me.

What about the other opportunities in the company? I'd be asking about the
departments - what projects are exciting, what they're designing (in my case
they happened to be doing financial hardware/software for check processing -
my 3 years in managing Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable gave me a
background that saved days in training). I'd be making it clear I like
learning and growing, and ask to understand the tasks you'll be expected and
skills/programming languages used. Hopefully you can get an idea of company
environment as well; nothing has helped me so much as having good coworkers
who were happy to use the skills that, although I wasn't hired for directly,
could really benefit in other capacities.

KR,
Erica

7 Nov 2008 - 5:47pm
SteveJBayer
2008

I'm interested in the answer too. A year back I was offered the
chance to apply for a technical writing job after the HR of a tech
firm found out I had a few weeks of experience in wire framing with
Visio for real projects.

I turned down the interview thinking they misunderstood the role I
played in writing out functional specifications in wire frames.

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7 Nov 2008 - 9:25pm
Heather Searl
2008

Hi Ali,

My 2 cents as a hiring manager. . .

Evaluate the positions on a few different things.

Which position jazzes you the most. To transition into the role you
eventually want you need to also show that you are a good employee,
hard worker, fast learner, dedicated etc. An education in UCD isn't
enough for an internal transfer, and it is hard to show off all of
your other skills in a position you hate. If neither position
excites you -- wait for a better one if you can afford to
financially.

Which position do you think you can do a better job at. Showing
competence in one area breeds confidence in a hiring manager that you
can be competent in another. Also there may be opportunities in both
positions to work with the Interaction Design team -- but that will
require the permission of your current manager. You are more likely
to get that permission if you are a valued employee.

Which position will let you learn the most. If you could use a
stronger background in the technical side -- a test position might
help you build those skills. If you could use some work on written
communication skills, tech writing will let you work on that. (Yah, I
realize this could contradict my previous point).

Which position would give you more opportunities to work with the
Interaction Design team? For example, I often use tech writers as
note takers in usability tests -- they tend to be very detail
oriented, they think procedurally AND they tend to take really good
notes because they have had practice interviewing SMEs. I also like
to run design ideas past a few people in the QA team because they
tend to be concerned about edge cases and where things will fail --
some can spot a design flaw or oversight a mile away.

So in short evaluate what you can bring to the positions as well as
what the positions can give to you.

I would hire someone from either position. UCD skills would count in
the decision, but so would work ethic, reputation and the additional
skills the person would bring to the design team.

I do have a bias though -- I started my career as a tech writer.

Heather

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8 Nov 2008 - 2:29pm
Abhay Rautela
2008

(I'd actually posted this earlier but it had gotten lost in the
moderation queue, I%u2019m leaving it unedited, it was supposed to
appear after Scott Berkun%u2019s reply)

It's a little unclear of what you mean by the technical tester
position you're being offered is about because you say technical
tester (usability). Further detail on both the positions and
organization would have been helpful.

If the technical tester position (though I doubt) involves you to
work only in Usability Testing, then I'd say go for it. You'll
(hopefully) get to plan and conduct all types of usability tests on
prototypes and products that are applicable to different phases of
the product development life cycle, learn to analyze test data and
present reports which will include recommendations to issues. And
recommendations is where you'll get to use your interaction design
skills since recommendations can involve presenting mockups,
wireframes and simple prototypes in order to explain what exactly
you're trying to propose.

Do ask HR what exactly will your role entail or even better ask them
if they could get you in touch with somebody within the company who
can explain it to you in detail. Will you get to plan tests,
facilitate them, act as a note taker or do all or any of them as
required? Will you be analyzing data gained from the usability tests?
Will preparing reports be a part of your role or your seniors take
care of that? If not, how long will it take before you can do most of
all of this?

But if you meant QA by Technical tester (and I'm not aware of QA's
handling usability testing), then I'll go with David, Elizabeth and
Scott and say grab the technical writer position. There are also a
lot of pure technical writers who move into usability and do a
fantastic job in it. What%u2019s common is that both revolve around
trying to understand the user and making products/ documents simple
for them to use. In fact, Janice (Ginny) Redish who%u2019s
co-authored %u201CUser and Task Analysis for Interface Design%u201D
(fantastic book) amongst others and also known as the
%u2018mother%u2019 of usability began work in document design and is
a Ph.D. in Linguistics. Technical writing will certainly help you
gain a good understanding of using simple language as effectively as
possible which you can then apply to the products you will work upon
as an interaction designer (sooner or) later in your career.

Best of luck!

Cone

www.conetrees.com
www.twitter.com/conetrees

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8 Nov 2008 - 2:43pm
Paul
2008

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9 Nov 2008 - 9:02am
Ali Naqvi
2008

Hello members,
These positions are offered by two different companies. The technical
tester position is offered by a company that provides alot of
training. I will be able to learn alot about project management,
testing methods and software. They know that I am not technical at
all. I ONLY know PHP and MYSQL. I've been told that technical tester
does not mean that one has to be able to code etc. This position is
about user interfaces and usability. NO user experience and NO
interaction design. Great company and decent salary and excellent
pension package. Bonus and free stuff too.
The technical writer position is at a smaller company and there I
know that my work is very independent. I will get feedback from the
user experience group though. I know that the salary is less and so
are other benefits but here I might be able to do interaction design
and user experience later on... Lets see what happens.

Ali

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9 Nov 2008 - 9:40am
Anonymous

Ali,

It seems like you know that you want to take the second job, but
maybe need to have a reason to turn down a better on-paper offer...?
I think you should go with whatever your gut is telling you.

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9 Nov 2008 - 9:49am
Anonymous

Question for everyone else, though: how can Ali, and others in the
position, continue to build the type of experience that will help him
move into an interaction design position in the future?

While I do understand the advice of everyone above, at the end of a
stint as a techwriter, aren't you still lacking interaction design
experience? How can you build your experience in design if you don't
have any opportunities to build your experience in design?

Both of Ali's positions seem related, but realistically if he wants
to move into a more design-focused position, what can he (or anyone)
do to build their experience/portfolio to the level that hiring
managers want?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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9 Nov 2008 - 10:08am
bminihan
2007

Hello Ali,

Take this as just another opinion, and of course follow your heart to
the right solution, since you really have to live with the result, and
you will make the most of whatever you choose.

But...if I were in your situation (as I was about 15 years ago), I
would go with the position that offered the most opportunities, even
if it didn't seem to be the best fit for what I want to do. If the
tester position is with a bigger company, it's more likely I'll
find a stepping stone there to another position that I like more.

It might help to think of these positions not as the step right
before you find that interaction design role. Rather, it might take
you 2 or 3 roles before you really get to do the design that you
want. I know that may not be what you want to hear, but if you
really want to be an interaction designer badly enough, you may have
to plot a course across 2-3 different roles, and perhaps 2-3
different companies, before you get where you want to be.

Another point (and this may just be me), but since the path you take
will probably lead you through many different roles, you might
eventually find that you prefer testing or writing to interaction
design. I'm not saying one is better than the other, but just
saying that if you find you like the kind of work you're doing at
any given step - stick with it awhile, learn to get really good at
it, and enjoy it. Don't feel like you constantly have to be pushing
toward that interaction design role, as you'll likely miss some other
opportunities that might lead to an even more fulfilling career.

Hope this helps, and best of luck on your decision and future career
(whatever it turns out to be =]).

Bryan

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9 Nov 2008 - 10:45am
Catriona Lohan-...
2007

Ali:

Like I said to you earlier offline, you seem to like the 2nd option
better. On the surface, I think it's got a better career path but
Brian makes a good point about resources and size of the company (and
ability to stay solvent in this economy). You could level with the
company u are leaning toward most and tell them you have another
offer and discuss you career goals and ask them how you can work
together to be mutually beneficial.

I agree with Brian on plotting your moves. People have told me I seem
to calculate my moves in two's - I didn't do it consciously - but on
reflection I see it and it makes sense. Think about what you are
bringing to the company and how might you leave in 2 or so years.
What is the likely exchange of experience.

Catriona
__________________________
Catríona Lohan-Conway
User Experience Architect
917 405 5127
clohanconway at mac.com

P Please consider our environment before printing.

9 Nov 2008 - 10:52am
erica
2008

I know personally my "entry level editing" position easily became one that
required designing compiled help systems and other documentation, and is
hopefully going to move to helping design interfaces for their new software,
as well as designing expansions to their current documentation (ie.
reference cards and other formats for different needs). F'ex, I want to
re-tool their current user assistance CHM's (which I wrote anyway, so, don't
get me wrong, I've just learned since then), and work with the developers to
make a usable interface for software that is packed full of features but
damn hard to use right now.

I don't know if that's possible everywhere, though I imagine in a lot of big
companies there are chances to move laterally? There are also distance
education, professional groups, and volunteer opportunities. Tech
communication still provides a good background and a good place to start in
my experience.

Cheers,
Erica

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of allison
Sent: November 9, 2008 6:50 AM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] What to choose? (technical writer or technical
tester)

Question for everyone else, though: how can Ali, and others in the
position, continue to build the type of experience that will help him
move into an interaction design position in the future?

While I do understand the advice of everyone above, at the end of a
stint as a techwriter, aren't you still lacking interaction design
experience? How can you build your experience in design if you don't
have any opportunities to build your experience in design?

Both of Ali's positions seem related, but realistically if he wants
to move into a more design-focused position, what can he (or anyone)
do to build their experience/portfolio to the level that hiring
managers want?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35392

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
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9 Nov 2008 - 11:05am
Ali Naqvi
2008

Hello members,
thanks again for your replies. You are all right. My dream is to
settle down in Australia or a warm place in the US in about 2 years.
I have a son and want him to be bigger before I leave. My aim has
always to leave this cold and small country.
I have had a conversation with a friend of mine who referred this job
to me. The Technical Tester position includes alot of training and is
not at all THAT technical. User Interface usability is also part of
it and I pretty much will run everything myself. If I believe that
this or that is needed then that is my call. Lets see what happens
tomorrow. I will be heading to the Tech Writer company tomorrow and
have a final conversation and Tuesday its the technical tester
position.
I can always apply for a user experience or an interaction design
position later on at both corporations as you also have told me.
Ali- confused but hopeful

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9 Nov 2008 - 1:19pm
erica
2008

Good luck Ali, I'll be interested to see how it goes!

I understand how you feel conflicted - I'm in the midst of considering
several paths as well. Instructional Design, Interface Design, or Technical
Writing. Ultimately for me any of the three could be really exciting, it
really depends more on the tasks that pan out in the particular company, the
environment, and the opportunities to keep on growing, rather than the
money.

F'ex with one company, I'd be one of many writers in a huge, successful
business that treats its employees well. I might be able to move later on,
but probably would stick with plain technical writing. With another, I'd be
the head user experience designer and manager, and get to work on a project
I am excited about along with managing several of interest, plus I like the
people there. With the last, I don't know the company, but I know the job
will be challenging, force me to grow and learn a lot, and will still be
with a big, stable company too.

It's good to have options. It's also slightly overwhelming :)

Cheers,
Erica

-----Original Message-----
From: discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com
[mailto:discuss-bounces at lists.interactiondesigners.com] On Behalf Of Ali
Naqvi
Sent: November 9, 2008 8:05 AM
To: discuss at ixda.org
Subject: Re: [IxDA Discuss] What to choose? (technical writer or technical
tester)

Hello members,
thanks again for your replies. You are all right. My dream is to
settle down in Australia or a warm place in the US in about 2 years.
I have a son and want him to be bigger before I leave. My aim has
always to leave this cold and small country.
I have had a conversation with a friend of mine who referred this job
to me. The Technical Tester position includes alot of training and is
not at all THAT technical. User Interface usability is also part of
it and I pretty much will run everything myself. If I believe that
this or that is needed then that is my call. Lets see what happens
tomorrow. I will be heading to the Tech Writer company tomorrow and
have a final conversation and Tuesday its the technical tester
position.
I can always apply for a user experience or an interaction design
position later on at both corporations as you also have told me.
Ali- confused but hopeful

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35392

________________________________________________________________
Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
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9 Nov 2008 - 1:30pm
Adrian Howard
2005

On 9 Nov 2008, at 06:49, allison wrote:

>Question for everyone else, though: how can Ali, and others in the
> position, continue to build the type of experience that will help him
> move into an interaction design position in the future?

By looking at either role with an eye to building those skills?

I've noticed that _good_ testers and technical writers (and customer
support folk also) often have excellent insights into the mindset of
the user.

Tech writers, unfortunately, seem to spend a lot of their careers
explaining "bad" interfaces to users. Doing so well involves
understanding the users goals and needs.

The best testers get the most bang from their testing buck by
focussing on the biggest problems that users are likely to encounter.
Again - doing that well involves an understanding of the users goal
and needs.

While a role as a tech writer or a tester isn't going to give you the
vast majority of the skills you need for a career in design - it can
certainly give you a good hard lesson in some of the underlying
problems that good design addresses. That can only help I think :)

Adrian

9 Nov 2008 - 1:53pm
erica
2008

> While a role as a tech writer or a tester isn't going to give you the
> vast majority of the skills you need for a career in design - it can
> certainly give you a good hard lesson in some of the underlying
> problems that good design addresses. That can only help I think :)

Sure. When you're madly trying to document menus and interface designs that
are clumsy or non-intuitive, in some companies you'll be the first person
thinking "my goodness, this would be so much more usable if...". At least
where I worked, the QA testers were simply testing features, and were so
familiar with the software and focused on internal issues that they didn't
seem to notice interface concerns. They were too close to the software and
business goals, not focused out on customers.

Tech writing doesn't give you graphics design, illustration, or drawing
skills, and won't often give you time to work in Photoshop or with CSS and
HTML either. But it certainly can lead you through to designing navigation,
and graphics principles such as those involved with readable typography,
designing layouts, and printing colours effectively. You may need to gain
those skills through after-hours work like courses and volunteering, but
you'll be the best person to see their importance and apply them well.
You'll learn about usability, and you might be the first person in the
company who notices the menus are poorly laid out or the properties are hard
to understand and poorly labeled. Because you're already the one trying to
make up for it. Once you have the in and have proven yourself, it's a good
time to offer suggestions and help developers design it well. After all,
they don't *want* to know how best to lay out menu options, they just want
to code the darn things. And business analysts can understand the metrics
and liaise with customers, but usually see in terms of ROI and "easy to use"
rather than specifics as to how interfaces are not intuitive.

Cheers,
Erica

9 Nov 2008 - 9:57pm
Michael Micheletti
2006

Hi Ali,

If it helps, I actually went from interaction designer to technical writer
(asked by an old friend, out of the blue) and then back again. The technical
writer position was challenging for me. I'm too creative by nature and
needed to dial that back and become more detail-focused and precise. I was
able to do quite a bit of design for print, marketing writing, and all sorts
of other stuff while in that role. My writing improved. It was fun enough
for a while, and then I started missing application design work. Glad to be
back in it again.

I've done a fair amount of casual testing since I've mostly worked in
technology companies. I don't find it much fun, even though I seem to have
"the touch" and can break almost anything given twenty minutes or so. The
real testers always get their schedules compressed by some sort of
development funkiness and have to stay late at night, on the weekend, over a
holiday, etc. There doesn't seem to be a career path from tester to anything
else, except maybe software developer. The one little pleasure testers seem
to have shows up as a small evil grin when they've found a really good bug,
because then the developer gets to stay late working to fix something and
keep them company. Maybe I'm missing out on the joys of testing, having
never done it as a steady diet, but I'd go writer if given the choice. Best
of luck,

Michael Micheletti

10 Nov 2008 - 2:50am
Harry Brignull
2004

Hi Ali,

is there a reason why you must choose from one of those two positions? You may have other options that you are not currently aware of.

One way in to UX is to get a job as a research analyst or research assistant at a specialist UX consultancy. Or you can do an internship (if you can afford to right now).

Do some prospecting, send some emails. You might get lucky.

regards,

Harry

10 Nov 2008 - 7:46am
Ali Naqvi
2008

Hello members,
well the reason why I only can choose from these two job openings is
that I have ben jobless for 3 months now and have been offerede these
lately. I cant wait any longer since I have to pay mortgage and
support my family.
(No more loans granted.)
I had a meeting regarding the tech writer job, and the hiring manager
actually liked my portfolio and said that he MIGHT send me to the
usability or user experience group instead. (though the tech writer
position is a part of their overall user experience group)
He wasnt sure whether I would fit in the tech writer position since
my portfolio was too strong. I might be over qualified for that he
said... BUT lets see what happens. They do EVERYTHING inhouse and he
told me that my skills might be needed in their new created user
experience / usability department.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35392

10 Nov 2008 - 10:17am
david.shaw6@gma...
2004

Ali,
That's very good news. If the manager says that your portfolio is that
strong, you may be well ahead of the curve on your way to landing an IxD
position. Good luck!

David

On Mon, Nov 10, 2008 at 4:46 AM, Ali Naqvi <ali at amroha.dk> wrote:

> Hello members,
> well the reason why I only can choose from these two job openings is
> that I have ben jobless for 3 months now and have been offerede these
> lately. I cant wait any longer since I have to pay mortgage and
> support my family.
> (No more loans granted.)
> I had a meeting regarding the tech writer job, and the hiring manager
> actually liked my portfolio and said that he MIGHT send me to the
> usability or user experience group instead. (though the tech writer
> position is a part of their overall user experience group)
> He wasnt sure whether I would fit in the tech writer position since
> my portfolio was too strong. I might be over qualified for that he
> said... BUT lets see what happens. They do EVERYTHING inhouse and he
> told me that my skills might be needed in their new created user
> experience / usability department.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35392
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
"Art provokes thinking, design solves problems"

w: http://www.davidshaw.info

11 Nov 2008 - 5:53pm
Laura Lemay
2008

Speaking as a long-time technical writer, if you do go that route, make
sure you aggressively market your IxD skills inside the company (and
keep up on the trends outside the company) even as you build tech
writing skills. Tech writers are not high on the development food
chain, and you may find yourself pigeon-holed as "just the writer" if
you're complacent about it.

Laura

Ali Naqvi wrote:
> Hello members,
> well the reason why I only can choose from these two job openings is
> that I have ben jobless for 3 months now and have been offerede these
> lately. I cant wait any longer since I have to pay mortgage and
> support my family.
> (No more loans granted.)
> I had a meeting regarding the tech writer job, and the hiring manager
> actually liked my portfolio and said that he MIGHT send me to the
> usability or user experience group instead. (though the tech writer
> position is a part of their overall user experience group)
> He wasnt sure whether I would fit in the tech writer position since
> my portfolio was too strong. I might be over qualified for that he
> said... BUT lets see what happens. They do EVERYTHING inhouse and he
> told me that my skills might be needed in their new created user
> experience / usability department.
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=35392
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

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