Pie Menus

28 Oct 2008 - 10:53am
5 years ago
11 replies
1189 reads
Mike Cuesta
2008

Hello everyone, I'm new to IxDA, glad to be part of this. I wanted to share
this interesting article:

http://jonoscript.wordpress.com/2008/10/28/pie-in-the-sky/

What are your thoughts?

- Mike

avisena.com
mikecuesta.com

--

It's easier to invent the future than to predict it.

Comments

28 Oct 2008 - 12:06pm
Anonymous

Hi Mike,

Lateral movement is easier, shorter is quicker. The pie chart has a larger area in terms of direction of travel i.e. there is more tolerance. The pie is smaller but its nearer. See Fitt's Law for a mathematical view.

Ivor Tillier
Senior Web Producer

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http://jonoscript.wordpress.com/2008/10/28/pie-in-the-sky/

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28 Oct 2008 - 12:27pm
David Talbot
2008

I'm glad seeing interests for pie menus. They have some limitations
(ie.: screen space and number of elements) but present major
advantages offer linear menus. One I like is the possibility to use
marks for selection instead of pointing. Gordon Kurtembach made a
Ph.D. thesis on the subject, calling it "Marking Menus":

KURTENBACH G. (1993). "The design and evaluation of marking menus",
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, 173 p.

There's another implementation for Firefox that might interest you.
Its called easyGestures: http://easygestures.mozdev.org/

Also, here's a very interresting project called "Circle Dock" to
allow you to select application in windows:
http://circledock.wikidot.com/

For mac, the equivalent would be Trampoline:
http://www.old-jewel.com/trampoline/

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34967

28 Oct 2008 - 1:07pm
Robert Hoekman, Jr.
2005

> For mac, the equivalent would be Trampoline:
> http://www.old-jewel.com/trampoline/

Sweet — I already love it! Thanks for the tip.

I've used QuickSilver for at least a year now, but Trampoline is a
nice alternative for those core apps I open all the time. (Doesn't
work so well for folders, though, because instead of opening the
folder, you get a new radial menu for each level of the hierarchy.)

-r-

29 Oct 2008 - 12:34am
Troy Gardner
2008

I love radial / orbital menus which are related to pie. Especially when
dealing with deeply nested hierarchies as on windows/web, it's SOOO easy to
accidently mouse off a deeply nested menu, and then have to retraverse it,
to miss it again!

Even back in 2005 I had one on my site (still up). It's actually has more
than one depth, and a sort of zooming. It is a mini research project to see
how well motion could be used to convey relationship. This is because my
previous job was doing neural network visualization and we had saturated
color, position for carrying information. There is a button off to the left
side to turn visual hierarchy back on.

The other thing I tried to explore is navigation vrs reading. You can click
on the window to bring it front. Everything is draggable.

http://www.troyworks.com/menu.html

Troy.

On Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 8:53 AM, Mike Cuesta <mikecuesta at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hello everyone, I'm new to IxDA, glad to be part of this. I wanted to share
> this interesting article:
>
> http://jonoscript.wordpress.com/2008/10/28/pie-in-the-sky/
>
> What are your thoughts?
>
>
> - Mike
>
> avisena.com
> mikecuesta.com
>
> --
>
> It's easier to invent the future than to predict it.
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>
>

29 Oct 2008 - 12:52am
Jarod Tang
2007

>
> http://www.troyworks.com/menu.html
>
Sorry, it's a bit hard for me to use it after some trying. there's
maybe some reasons
1. adapt to the normal menu design patterns
2. it's easier to read the in line mode instead of circle mode, which
may have big influnce on daily point/action work

But if it's touchable interface (such as iphone), it maybe different,
while there's two hands hold the device, and it maybe easier for
operation ( but i suspect the old palm's grid interface, such as Palm
Tx, works better on this condition )

Cheers,
-- Jarod

On Wed, Oct 29, 2008 at 1:34 PM, Troy Gardner <troy at troyworks.com> wrote:
> I love radial / orbital menus which are related to pie. Especially when
> dealing with deeply nested hierarchies as on windows/web, it's SOOO easy to
> accidently mouse off a deeply nested menu, and then have to retraverse it,
> to miss it again!
>
> Even back in 2005 I had one on my site (still up). It's actually has more
> than one depth, and a sort of zooming. It is a mini research project to see
> how well motion could be used to convey relationship. This is because my
> previous job was doing neural network visualization and we had saturated
> color, position for carrying information. There is a button off to the left
> side to turn visual hierarchy back on.
>
> The other thing I tried to explore is navigation vrs reading. You can click
> on the window to bring it front. Everything is draggable.
>
> http://www.troyworks.com/menu.html
>
> Troy.
>
> On Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 8:53 AM, Mike Cuesta <mikecuesta at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Hello everyone, I'm new to IxDA, glad to be part of this. I wanted to share
>> this interesting article:
>>
>> http://jonoscript.wordpress.com/2008/10/28/pie-in-the-sky/
>>
>> What are your thoughts?
>>
>>
>> - Mike
>>
>> avisena.com
>> mikecuesta.com
>>
>> --
>>
>> It's easier to invent the future than to predict it.
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

29 Oct 2008 - 12:11pm
Krystal Higgins
2008

Jarod, I think you nailed it with better in touch interface usages
(perhaps large touch-screen real estate, though).

With the mouse or tablet, disconnected from my screen, it's quite
difficult. But I got an opportunity to play with Jeff Han's
invokable circle menu, which worked rather well and felt much more
natural (of course, his screen has a lot of real-estate).

Cheers,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34967

29 Oct 2008 - 12:23pm
Jarod Tang
2007

Hi Krystal,

> difficult. But I got an opportunity to play with Jeff Han's
> invokable circle menu, which worked rather well and felt much more
> natural (of course, his screen has a lot of real-estate).
>
Cool, could you give a pointer ( link ) for the invokable circle menu ?

Cheers,
-- Jarod

--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

29 Oct 2008 - 1:29pm
Krystal Higgins
2008

Sure thing! Youtube video is probably the better demonstration (starts
invoking it a few times around the 10-20 second mark).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfFwgPuEdSk&feature=related

Haven't gotten a chance to use the similar technology in MS Surface,
but I've heard they've implemented the principle (and others)
poorly. But perhaps someone else has some first-hand experience that
can comment.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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29 Oct 2008 - 9:52pm
Jarod Tang
2007

Hi Krystal,

>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfFwgPuEdSk&feature=related
It seems Jeff Han use (popup) list menu as well as pie menu at the
same time, and his method triggering the pie menu looks quite
interesting.

Thanks,
-- Jarod

--
http://designforuse.blogspot.com/

30 Oct 2008 - 7:03am
Kaleem
2008

Dave Talbot discussed Gord Kurtenbach's work at Alias (now Autodesk)
in his earlier post --
http://www.ixda.org/discuss.php?post=34967#34978 -- which led to
Gord's PhD thesis on "The Design and Evaluation of Marking Menus"
:
http://www.dgp.toronto.edu/~gordo/papers/thesis.pdf.

Bill Buxton was Alias Chief Scientist at the time much of that
research was conducted, and under his tenure Alias products began to
integrate the research. The most notable use was in Sketchbook Pro --
which was designed around gestural interaction -- but Maya and Studio
Tools also use these menus, as I recall. You can download trial
versions from Autodesk:

http://area.autodesk.com/sketchbook

Gord is now Director of Autodesk Applied Research Group in Toronto.
Here is a video from the early research conducted with George
Fitzmaurice, Azam Khan and Don Almeida that compares marking menus,
dropdown menus and pie menus:

"Gesture Recognition in Marking Menus"
www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtH9GdFSQaw

-K

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
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31 Oct 2008 - 8:53am
David Talbot
2008

Thanks for the video and references! The video really shows the value
of marking menu. An earlier conparison of pie vs linear menu was
made, that you might know about, Kaleem, and I post it as reference
purposes.

CALLAHAN J., HOPKINS D., WEISER M., SHNEIDERMAN B. (1988). « An
empirical comparison
of pie vs. linear menus », Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on
Human factors in computing
systems, Washington, D. C., p. 95-100.

Note that it's an early study on pie menus and does not yet mention
the fact of using marks for selection. In addition to this, I post
references to other studies involving radial and marking menu:

BORITZ J., BOOTH K. S., COWAN W. B. (1991). « Fitts's law studies of
directional mouse
movement. » Proceedings of Graphics interface '91, Canadian
Information Processing
Society, p. 216-223.

ZHAO S., BALAKRISHNAN R. (2004). « Simple vs. compound mark
hierarchical marking
menus », Proceedings of the 17th annual ACM symposium on User
interface software and
technology, Santa Fe, NM, 10 p.

Regards,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34967

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