Country from or to in Travel

23 Oct 2008 - 4:45am
5 years ago
11 replies
361 reads
AJ Kock
2007

I am in the Travel industry and we have found that people completing
an online form has problems understanding when a field means "their
country of origin" or the "country they want to travel too."

We have the country field under the "personal details" section, but
some people still tend to complete it with their country of
destination.

Does anybody here have a suggestion on how to solve this? Should we
change the wording for country to something like "Home Country", Your
Country" or Country of Origin" or is there another way?

Comments

23 Oct 2008 - 5:38am
Caroline Jarrett
2007

From: AJKock

> I am in the Travel industry and we have found that people completing
> an online form has problems understanding when a field means "their
> country of origin" or the "country they want to travel too."
>
> We have the country field under the "personal details" section, but
> some people still tend to complete it with their country of
> destination.
>
> Does anybody here have a suggestion on how to solve this? Should we
> change the wording for country to something like "Home Country", Your
> Country" or Country of Origin" or is there another way?

Changing the question can work.

A strategy that is more likely to work is to ask for country in a more
natural way, which is as a component of their address (if it is appropriate
to ask for their address as part of their personal details).

Note that the country of origin may not be the same as the place that the
live.

You might do better with "Where does your journey start?" and "Where are you
travelling to?"

Best
Caroline Jarrett
----------------------
"Forms that work: Designing web forms for usability" available from 17th
November 2008
http://www.amazon.com/Forms-that-Work-Interactive-Technologies/dp/1558607102
/ref=pd_bbs_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1224758232&sr=8-1

23 Oct 2008 - 5:56am
AJ Kock
2007

> A strategy that is more likely to work is to ask for country in a more
> natural way, which is as a component of their address (if it is appropriate
> to ask for their address as part of their personal details).

We are using the "Jakob N loves us" Wufoo form and unfortunately they
only have an address field, when if you make it compulsory, people
have to complete their whole adress and country. We are really only
interested in the country and don't want to create too much effort for
the user in completing the form. I had to create a drop down box from
scracth for the countries. I can now add the address fields above it
to give it more relevance, but that would just increase the size of
the form with 4-5 lines (of information we don't actually need).

> Note that the country of origin may not be the same as the place that the
> live.

Very good point. Tx

> You might do better with "Where does your journey start?" and "Where are you
> travelling to?"
>

We only want to to know where they are from. We know from our product
which country is the destination. Journeys can also unfortunately
start in country of travel, so some people might still get confused.

23 Oct 2008 - 6:16am
darlenepike
2007

In what country do you live?

In what country is your permanent residence?

Where is your home base?

What country do you call home?

Place a help icon or link for more info. Next to the question, emgm,
"what's this"

On 10/23/08, AJKock <ajkock at gmail.com> wrote:
> I am in the Travel industry and we have found that people completing
> an online form has problems understanding when a field means "their
> country of origin" or the "country they want to travel too."
>
> We have the country field under the "personal details" section, but
> some people still tend to complete it with their country of
> destination.
>
> Does anybody here have a suggestion on how to solve this? Should we
> change the wording for country to something like "Home Country", Your
> Country" or Country of Origin" or is there another way?
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

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ph: 973-600-7113

23 Oct 2008 - 8:46am
Andy Polaine
2008

Then just use "In which country do you live?"

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Research | Writing | Strategy
Interaction Concept Design
Education Futures

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23 Oct 2008 - 5:16pm
cfmdesigns
2004

"Country of Origin" is ambiguous. Does it mean where you were born,
where you live, or where you are travelling from?

(I get that confusion when some asks where I am from. What does that
mean? Where were you born, they ask. We moved cross-country two weeks
later, and back two years after that. Where's your hometown? What's
that? I've never lived in the same city for more than 8 years, and
that's where I am now.)

-- Jim
Via my iPhone

On Oct 23, 2008, at 2:45 AM, AJKock <ajkock at gmail.com> wrote:

> I am in the Travel industry and we have found that people completing
> an online form has problems understanding when a field means "their
> country of origin" or the "country they want to travel too."
>
> We have the country field under the "personal details" section, but
> some people still tend to complete it with their country of
> destination.
>
> Does anybody here have a suggestion on how to solve this? Should we
> change the wording for country to something like "Home Country", Your
> Country" or Country of Origin" or is there another way?
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

23 Oct 2008 - 6:00pm
Mitchell Joe
2007

Can I see the form?

best,
Mitch

On Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 3:16 PM, Jim Drew <cfmdesigns at earthlink.net> wrote:

> "Country of Origin" is ambiguous. Does it mean where you were born, where
> you live, or where you are travelling from?
>
> (I get that confusion when some asks where I am from. What does that mean?
> Where were you born, they ask. We moved cross-country two weeks later, and
> back two years after that. Where's your hometown? What's that? I've never
> lived in the same city for more than 8 years, and that's where I am now.)
>
> -- Jim
> Via my iPhone
>
>
> On Oct 23, 2008, at 2:45 AM, AJKock <ajkock at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I am in the Travel industry and we have found that people completing
>> an online form has problems understanding when a field means "their
>> country of origin" or the "country they want to travel too."
>>
>> We have the country field under the "personal details" section, but
>> some people still tend to complete it with their country of
>> destination.
>>
>> Does anybody here have a suggestion on how to solve this? Should we
>> change the wording for country to something like "Home Country", Your
>> Country" or Country of Origin" or is there another way?
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

23 Oct 2008 - 4:59am
Mike Brown
2007

AJKock wrote:
> I am in the Travel industry and we have found that people completing
> an online form has problems understanding when a field means "their
> country of origin" or the "country they want to travel too."
>
> We have the country field under the "personal details" section, but
> some people still tend to complete it with their country of
> destination.
>
> Does anybody here have a suggestion on how to solve this? Should we
> change the wording for country to something like "Home Country", Your
> Country" or Country of Origin" or is there another way?

There's always another way!

Just call the field "Zip code" and make it mandatory.

;)

Mike
- happily living in 90210

24 Oct 2008 - 3:10am
Andy Polaine
2008

> Just call the field "Zip code" and make it mandatory.

No! Don't do that. Most of the world doesn't call it a Zip code and
every country has different formats. I hate it when I get funnelled
into a form using one country's terminology only. It's a Postcode in
the UK and Australia (both different formats) and a PLZ here in
Germany, for example.

"Which country do you live in?" seems to be easiest (I think "In which
country..." is the grammatically correct version, but the former feels
more clear).

Best,

Andy

28 Oct 2008 - 6:28am
AJ Kock
2007

@ Andy. I am currently experiencing exactly this terminology problem
from a previous form someone made for our Newsletter management and
the system also by default used "ZipCode" for "Country" and that led
to problems, when you want to sort data and the list only allows
"equal", "greater than", etc. for ZipCode, because it assumes the
field is numerical.

28 Oct 2008 - 1:47pm
Ali Naqvi
2008

you could write 'country of depature' instead of country of origin.
Depature and origin means two different things.

Ali

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Posted from the new ixda.org
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28 Oct 2008 - 1:52pm
Ali Naqvi
2008

Andy wrote'No! Don't do that. Most of the world doesn't call it a
Zip code and every country has different formats. I hate it when I
get funnelled into a form using one country's terminology only.'
Exactly! And what do you do if you live in Karachi, Pakistan??
Karachi does not have a zipcode or postal code!

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34743

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