Twitter

22 Oct 2008 - 1:03pm
5 years ago
83 replies
1878 reads
Melissa Sherman
2008

Interested in finding out who’s using Twitter and what for –
(Personal updates? Reinforcing/building
communities? Work related announcements?) and if anyone has found novel,
possibly unintended, uses for the product.

Comments

23 Oct 2008 - 9:04am
Mario Bourque
2008

I knew you did!

Computers are not useful; they cause me all sorts of grief!

We see these things as being useful because they complement our own lives in
some way. Those that don't understand, and there are a lot of them, can't
see the value.

A lot of companies are going through this generational shift where a
handshake and phone call is replaced with an IM or txt.

Mario

On Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 9:58 AM, Andy Polaine <apolaine at gmail.com> wrote:

> Just in case it sounded like I couldn't see the point of text messaging, I
> meant that question as a rhetorical one, or at least one to get him thinking
> about needs/function/purpose and design. Plenty of people never thought
> computers would be useful. Or a phone with a touchscreen instead of a
> keypad. The list is long...
>
> On 23 Oct 2008, at 15:44, Mario Bourque wrote:
>
> Text messaging is task-based and less intrusive. You text me, I'll text
>> you back when I can. Not as cumbersome as email, not as annoying as
>> answering the phone.
>>
>> I wouldn't text someone in an emergency though.
>>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
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>

--
Mario Bourque
Web: www.mariobourque.com
Email: mario at mariobourque.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/mariobourque

23 Oct 2008 - 9:47am
.pauric
2006

I'm an on/off twitter.com user.. however.. a colleague in our 35
strong UX team hand-rolled a Twitter 'Clone' for internal use.
Essentially its a hacked WP blog open to the team to make short
status & question posts.

With the team spread across 4 buildings and 80 product sets its
proving extraordinarily useful in eliminating the whitespace among
us.

For anyone working on large distributed teams I highly recommend
building something that's aligned with the principles behind the
twitter.com concept. Keeping it on your intranet maintains any IP
discussed.

/pauric
/@radiorental

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

23 Oct 2008 - 9:59am
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Oct 22, 2008, at 11:23 AM, bekee wrote:

> it makes me feel
> warm inside to follow jared spool's travels

Wow. If only my travels made *me* feel warm inside.

@jmspool

(Sitting in the jury pool room with no wifi, but good twitter access
on my iPhone.)

23 Oct 2008 - 2:01pm
Loren Baxter
2007

On Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 7:59 AM, Jared Spool <jspool at uie.com> wrote:

>
> Wow. If only my travels made *me* feel warm inside.
>
> @jmspool
>

Try the equator somewhere, or Arizona

@lorenbaxter

23 Oct 2008 - 2:08pm
SemanticWill
2007

Riffin' on Bill Maher's New Rules - UX/IA/IxD conferences can no longer be
held north of 30 degrees latitude

On Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 3:01 PM, Loren Baxter <loren.baxter at gmail.com>wrote:

> On Thu, Oct 23, 2008 at 7:59 AM, Jared Spool <jspool at uie.com> wrote:
>
> >
> > Wow. If only my travels made *me* feel warm inside.
> >
> > @jmspool
> >
>
> Try the equator somewhere, or Arizona
>
> @lorenbaxter
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

23 Oct 2008 - 4:06pm
Christian Crumlish
2006

Professionals in our field would also do well to study Twitter's meta-UI:
its open architecture that facilitates so many innovative I/O add-ons.
Also, it's an experience that each user can fine tune to their own benefit.
This is something that can make the benefits hard to discern from the
sidelines.

Plus, you get to meet Whitney Hess! :D

-x-

23 Oct 2008 - 10:41am
Whitney Hess
2008

Melissa, people often ask me why and how I use Twitter, so I wrote
this blog post to help explain: "How Twitter has changed my life"
http://whitneyhess.com/blog/2008/07/how-twitter-has-changed-my-life/

I hope you find it useful. The best way to understand the value that
Twitter can provide is to just start using it, a lot! Looks like
you're getting the hang of it so far.

Hope to chat with you soon,
Whitney
@whitneyhess

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

24 Oct 2008 - 2:24am
Fredrik Matheson
2005

@ William Brail: Twitter is fun when your friends are using it. I was on
Twitter for about a year before my colleagues and friends got in, and it's
gotten a lot more fun after that. I like having a balance of colleagues,
friends and IXDA'ers on my list.
@Niklas: lots of languages are spoken on Twitter. It's really just a matter
of connecting with the people you're interested in. My Norwegian friends
post in a mix of Norwegian and English, depending on the intended audience
for that particular message.

Like many others on this list I use a wide variety of conversation tools to
keep tabs on what's going on, to share what I'm doing/planning and to ask
questions.

Here's my list:

- mailing lists via Gmail for IXDA, etc
- forums for all sorts of other topics
- Flickr for image-driven discussions
- Campfire for discussing loosely work-related things with the others in my
unit at work
- Forums for discussing/sharing/asking the rest of the company stuff
- Wikis for, well, lots of things
- A blog for longer musings on design-ish topics
- Yammer to talk with colleagues about less formal stuff in semi real-time
(more real-time than forums, anyway), but we could be using Twitter for this
if there was some private setting you could add ("work only")
- Facebook for all sorts of casual conversations, especially with people I
don't talk to that often
- my tweets are duplicated as Facebook status messages
- Dopplr for where I'm going
- IM (via various clients, including Facebook) for a variety of discussions

Almost all of my messages are in text form. The variables are length, reach,
display method, a/synchronicity, persistence (attention-wise),
intended audience and to some degree privacy, all of which combine to create
a long list of tools for conversing.

If anyone's sitting on a nice visualization of the different conversation
tools – their contexts and components – I hope they'll share them here.

- Fredrik

(@movito)

24 Oct 2008 - 8:54am
Fred Beecher
2006

To me, Twitter is like sitting down at a big table full of other IxD types
and a few regular friends, doing the work we need to do, and chatting all
the while.

On 10/22/08, Melissa Sherman <melisherman at yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> Interested in finding out who's using Twitter and what for –
> (Personal updates? Reinforcing/building
> communities? Work related announcements?) and if anyone has found novel,
> possibly unintended, uses for the product.
>

24 Oct 2008 - 12:17pm
Carrie Ritch
2003

Love that Fred! As the lone IxD'er where I work it's nice to know
others like me are out there.

I've been following more than chatting but I'm working on balancing that out.

- Carrie

On Fri, Oct 24, 2008 at 9:54 AM, Fred Beecher <fbeecher at gmail.com> wrote:
> To me, Twitter is like sitting down at a big table full of other IxD types
> and a few regular friends, doing the work we need to do, and chatting all
> the while.

24 Oct 2008 - 12:26pm
Ian Chan
2005

Apropo Twitter, I've been studying it and other lifestreaming apps
(swurl, friendfeed, tumblr, dipity, soup, etc) recently and I'm really
curious about how people use it over time.

Of all the social media apps out there, twitter more than most seems
to have hit a certain nerve. A lot of folks just don't take to it at
all. Perhaps because it provides little feedback on who out there is
paying attention. Others I've spoken to feel self-conscious posting to
it. Many think it's a great idea but admit that they never read it.
For some it's virtually an ongoing chat -- and for others it's a self-
marketing tool.

People call it a micro-blogging tool but really I think it's an open
chat -- it strikes me as speech-based not as writing-based. And it
seems to me an example of how social software can "work" even when
from a software perspective they "fail." (Social media work on the
basis of social (use) practices, not operational/functional/feature
efficiency.) To wit, twitter does two things to conversation that are
upside down and in reverse:

--the speaker does not address her audience, but rather is selected by
her audience (the thing with followers)
--the speaker's message appears in a fictional thread: it is shown
alongside posts from those she is following, not those she is
addressing. Sometimes I wonder whether this illusion proves that
social media design is psychological!

I'm looking into how time-based social media set up different design
challenges to those of page-based media and would love to know how
your use has changed over time. Specifically,

--has it tailed off?
--do you read fewer tweets than you did when you started?
--has it meaning for you changed as you have adapted to it?
--do you see using it for a long time, or has it been a curiosity of
social media?

Twitter and other "social presence" apps are fascinating, and seem to
point to a genre of social media based more on the feed than on the
profile or the graph.

What do you all think?

--adrian

twitter.com/gravity7

On Oct 24, 2008, at 6:54 AM, Fred Beecher wrote:

> To me, Twitter is like sitting down at a big table full of other IxD
> types
> and a few regular friends, doing the work we need to do, and
> chatting all
> the while.
>
>
> On 10/22/08, Melissa Sherman <melisherman at yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>> Interested in finding out who's using Twitter and what for –
>> (Personal updates? Reinforcing/building
>> communities? Work related announcements?) and if anyone has found
>> novel,
>> possibly unintended, uses for the product.
>>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

cheers,

adrian chan

415 516 4442
Social Interaction Design (www.gravity7.com)
Sr Fellow, Society for New Communications Research (www.SNCR.org)
LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/adrianchan)

24 Oct 2008 - 12:26pm
Tori Breitling
2007

To follow up on Christian's comment about twitter's open
architecture...here's a post that covers nearly every twitter tool out
there, and the multitude of ways folks are using it. (I came upon the link
via Twitter, naturally. )

http://www.briansolis.com/2008/10/twitter-tools-for-community-and.html

tori
@tori

25 Oct 2008 - 6:11am
Abhay Rautela
2008

Twitter is a fantastic tool for user research. It can be used to
advantage in many cases for both enabling and conducting user
research.

Here's an interesting post:
http://dinamehta.com/blog/2008/02/01/twitter-for-ethnography/

I have begun using Twitter recently. Drop by sometime @
http://www.twitter.com/conetrees :)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

26 Oct 2008 - 4:56am
Andy Polaine
2008

Twitter reminds me a great deal of MOOs in the early days of the
interweb, except without the high-school kids running around barfing
on everyone.

Blogs and personal websites are much like the personal spaces people
used to build for themselves within MOOs too. The open chat is very
much the same and following a certain batch of people is very much
like going to a themed room in a MOO and chatting with people. Even
setting up your Follow stream to be request only reflects some of that
dynamic (some MOO rooms were/are invitation only). A person's Twitter
homepage is much like the 'look' command in MOOs too.

I see a lot of the same timbre of conversation, even though the themes
have moved on and broadened, of course. It's interesting to see so
much come around again and also interesting that it no longer needs
the virtual space metaphor for it to work. Other people are still the
most interesting content online.

Best,

Andy

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
Andy Polaine

Research | Writing | Strategy
Interaction Concept Design
Education Futures

Twitter: apolaine
Skype: apolaine

http://playpen.polaine.com
http://www.designersreviewofbooks.com
http://www.omnium.net.au
http://www.antirom.com

26 Oct 2008 - 6:43am
martinpolley
2007

Other people are still the most interesting content period.

--
Martin Polley
Technical writer, interaction designer
+972 52 3864280
Twitter: martinpolley
<http://capcloud.com/>

26 Oct 2008 - 10:31am
Lucilla
2008

Thanks for the post. This whole Twitter thread has certainly got me
thinking on viewing Twitter as a tool for doing user research among a
particular type of research participants, i.e. ones who are comfortable with
SMS and IM either on the mobile or PC platform. I doubt if Twitter itself
on its own can provide the kinds of deep data that you'll need. If that's
the case, how would you use Twitter in conjunction with other types of
qualitative research methods?

Here's another interesting post: a survey of 3,000 US-based users and their
use of online communities. *The study concludes that Twitter serves
niches:*"Although both Twitter and SecondLife have received enormous
amounts of
press coverage, and are used intensely by some people, they are dwarfed in
membership by the major social sites such as Facebook, MySpace, and even
LinkedIn."

http://mobileopportunity.blogspot.com/2008/10/everything-you-always-wanted-to-know.html

cheers,
Lucilla Madamba

LinkedIn Profile: www.linkedin.com/in/lucilla
Twitter: sailorlass <http://twitter.com/sailorlass>

On Sat, Oct 25, 2008 at 7:11 AM, Cone Trees <hello at conetrees.com> wrote:

> Twitter is a fantastic tool for user research. It can be used to
> advantage in many cases for both enabling and conducting user
> research.
>
> Here's an interesting post:
> http://dinamehta.com/blog/2008/02/01/twitter-for-ethnography/
>
> I have begun using Twitter recently. Drop by sometime @
> http://www.twitter.com/conetrees :)
>
>
> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> Posted from the new ixda.org
> http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

26 Oct 2008 - 5:58pm
SemanticWill
2007

Although some have argued that Twitter may be an effective tool for user
research, I think anyone who thinks it can be the *only* tool is delusional.
It can, at best, provide some data for user research, but I would be
negligent to argue that you could use that and some other similar tools to
develop deliverables like personas.

On Sun, Oct 26, 2008 at 11:31 AM, Lucilla Madamba <lmadamba at gmail.com>wrote:

> Thanks for the post. This whole Twitter thread has certainly got me
> thinking on viewing Twitter as a tool for doing user research among a
> particular type of research participants, i.e. ones who are comfortable
> with
> SMS and IM either on the mobile or PC platform. I doubt if Twitter itself
> on its own can provide the kinds of deep data that you'll need. If that's
> the case, how would you use Twitter in conjunction with other types of
> qualitative research methods?
>
> Here's another interesting post: a survey of 3,000 US-based users and their
> use of online communities. *The study concludes that Twitter serves
> niches:*"Although both Twitter and SecondLife have received enormous
> amounts of
> press coverage, and are used intensely by some people, they are dwarfed in
> membership by the major social sites such as Facebook, MySpace, and even
> LinkedIn."
>
>
> http://mobileopportunity.blogspot.com/2008/10/everything-you-always-wanted-to-know.html
>
>
> cheers,
> Lucilla Madamba
>
> LinkedIn Profile: www.linkedin.com/in/lucilla
> Twitter: sailorlass <http://twitter.com/sailorlass>
>
>
> On Sat, Oct 25, 2008 at 7:11 AM, Cone Trees <hello at conetrees.com> wrote:
>
> > Twitter is a fantastic tool for user research. It can be used to
> > advantage in many cases for both enabling and conducting user
> > research.
> >
> > Here's an interesting post:
> > http://dinamehta.com/blog/2008/02/01/twitter-for-ethnography/
> >
> > I have begun using Twitter recently. Drop by sometime @
> > http://www.twitter.com/conetrees :)
> >
> >
> > . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
> > Posted from the new ixda.org
> > http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682
> >
> >
> > ________________________________________________________________
> > Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> > To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> > Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> > List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> > List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
> >
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
~ will

"Where you innovate, how you innovate,
and what you innovate are design problems"

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Will Evans | User Experience Architect
tel: +1.617.281.1281 | will at semanticfoundry.com
aim: semanticwill
gtalk: semanticwill
twitter: semanticwill
skype: semanticwill
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

27 Oct 2008 - 12:24pm
Erik van de Wiel
2008

Started using Twitter a couple of weeks ago. For example it is nice to
see what people are doing in between their blog posts. Other than that
when given the chance of getting to know some very interesting people
is always something you at least try.

My twitter: www.twitter.com/aapjerockdt

Grtz,
Erik

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

27 Oct 2008 - 3:15pm
Anonymous

Hello all,

I'm arriving at the party a bit late, but I can't help but respond to
William Brall's post, especially the part about about how "The 140 character
limit means you can't say much, which means the value of the tweet is in
immediate impact."

A few months ago, I responded to a fellow UXer's tweet about how, in his
opinion, most tweets were either boring or valueless. A similar complaint
to my mind. This might be true, but until you've experienced twitter over
TIME, you will not see the value (and pleasure) in the on-going narrative
created by twitterers who tweet about a broad range of thoughts, subjects
and, yes, feelings. This, of course, applies only to those who tweet in a
particular way, but I've found that many people I mutually follow tend to
tweet about a range of things that all add up to an interesting personal
narrative.

For example, I've not only gotten to know someone I once met at a conference
better through twitter, but I also learned that he plays the ukulele, likes
grilling merguez sausage, is writing a novel in his spare time and has a
wicked sense of wordplay. (Can anyone recognize this person?) The next
time I saw this person at a conference, not only did I feel like I knew him
a bit better, but there was a lot more I wanted to talk about. The more I
get to know him, the more I want to know about the stupid cat hijinks as
well as his opinions on web apps etc.; because with all this, I get
dimension, something we often lose in other, more mono-message,
communication formats.

As Martin said above, the SUM really is greater than its parts. To me, one
of the greatest pleasures of using twitter, apart from growing new
friendships and discovering great insight, has been in experiencing the
on-going narrative of these same twitterfriends as told through their
running posts.

I would also add, somewhat preemptively, that the brevity of the posts do
not, imho, make for a shallow narrative, but one that is perhaps more
poetic---like a synedoche. (But, then, I'm a sucker for this kind of
thinking.) It's also not the only value I see in twitter, just one that
stands out as fairly unique.

Cheers,
Cindy

(twittering as cchastain)
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>

--
Cindy Chastain
917-848-7995

27 Oct 2008 - 9:47pm
Ian Chan
2005

Cindy,

I'd love your feedback on the msg i posted to twitter Oct 24 --
because you clearly read tweets with attention, and with a sense of
narrative -- and the person you described is interesting in what they
reveal -- my own posts are not nearly as content rich -- in fact are
often ceremonial or part of a conversation, so they're often missing
in content completely but are instead an agreement or approval, etc.
-- some posters do seem to tweet the handling of interaction, some the
content of their activities, some tweet to share/distribute, and so
on. All tweets seem to at least announce presence and simultaneously
declare availability for interaction -- something necessitated on
twitter because there's no "online now" indication....

cheers,
a

On Oct 27, 2008, at 1:15 PM, Cindy Chastain wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> I'm arriving at the party a bit late, but I can't help but respond to
> William Brall's post, especially the part about about how "The 140
> character
> limit means you can't say much, which means the value of the tweet
> is in
> immediate impact."
>
> A few months ago, I responded to a fellow UXer's tweet about how, in
> his
> opinion, most tweets were either boring or valueless. A similar
> complaint
> to my mind. This might be true, but until you've experienced twitter
> over
> TIME, you will not see the value (and pleasure) in the on-going
> narrative
> created by twitterers who tweet about a broad range of thoughts,
> subjects
> and, yes, feelings. This, of course, applies only to those who
> tweet in a
> particular way, but I've found that many people I mutually follow
> tend to
> tweet about a range of things that all add up to an interesting
> personal
> narrative.
>
> For example, I've not only gotten to know someone I once met at a
> conference
> better through twitter, but I also learned that he plays the
> ukulele, likes
> grilling merguez sausage, is writing a novel in his spare time and
> has a
> wicked sense of wordplay. (Can anyone recognize this person?) The
> next
> time I saw this person at a conference, not only did I feel like I
> knew him
> a bit better, but there was a lot more I wanted to talk about. The
> more I
> get to know him, the more I want to know about the stupid cat
> hijinks as
> well as his opinions on web apps etc.; because with all this, I get
> dimension, something we often lose in other, more mono-message,
> communication formats.
>
> As Martin said above, the SUM really is greater than its parts. To
> me, one
> of the greatest pleasures of using twitter, apart from growing new
> friendships and discovering great insight, has been in experiencing
> the
> on-going narrative of these same twitterfriends as told through their
> running posts.
>
> I would also add, somewhat preemptively, that the brevity of the
> posts do
> not, imho, make for a shallow narrative, but one that is perhaps more
> poetic---like a synedoche. (But, then, I'm a sucker for this kind of
> thinking.) It's also not the only value I see in twitter, just one
> that
> stands out as fairly unique.
>
> Cheers,
> Cindy
>
> (twittering as cchastain)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________________________________________
>> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
>> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
>> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
>> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
>> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Cindy Chastain
> 917-848-7995
> ________________________________________________________________
> Welcome to the Interaction Design Association (IxDA)!
> To post to this list ....... discuss at ixda.org
> Unsubscribe ................ http://www.ixda.org/unsubscribe
> List Guidelines ............ http://www.ixda.org/guidelines
> List Help .................. http://www.ixda.org/help

cheers,

adrian chan

415 516 4442
Social Interaction Design (www.gravity7.com)
Sr Fellow, Society for New Communications Research (www.SNCR.org)
LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/adrianchan)

27 Oct 2008 - 10:41pm
Andreas Ringdal
2008

Ernest Hemingway was once challenged to write a story in six words.
The result: "For sale: baby shoes, never used."

Perhaps it is time for the Twitter novel?

andreas

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

27 Oct 2008 - 11:41pm
Ian Chan
2005

"Found: Baby. Needs shoes."

;-)

a

cheers,

adrian chan

415 516 4442
Social Interaction Design (www.gravity7.com)
Sr Fellow, Society for New Communications Research (www.SNCR.org)
LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/adrianchan)

28 Oct 2008 - 12:32am
Sharon Greenfield5
2008

Wicked sense of wordplay? Ukelele?

I guess Bill DeRouchey!

28 Oct 2008 - 1:19am
Steve Baty
2009

You might enjoy this: an example of Tweet-noir -
http://stilgherrian.com/sydney/gonzo-twitter-1-saturday-evening-in-newtown/

2008/10/28 live <human.factor.one at gmail.com>

> Wicked sense of wordplay? Ukelele?
>
> I guess Bill DeRouchey!
>
>
>

28 Oct 2008 - 3:27am
Andy Polaine
2008

The Phone Book project in the UK (http://www.the-phone-book.com) do a
great project on short text writing. The winner one year was titled
"Everything I Had to Say the Day You Died". The rest of story was "...".

On 27 Oct 2008, at 20:41, Andreas Ringdal wrote:

> Ernest Hemingway was once challenged to write a story in six words.
> The result: "For sale: baby shoes, never used."
>
> Perhaps it is time for the Twitter novel?

28 Oct 2008 - 6:40am
Dave Malouf
2005

2 thoughts on the 140char count:
1. It has actually improved my writing and worsened my spelling.
2. Ya know, you can write across multiple tweets.

Cindy, great story. Ambient Intimacy is a great way of shoring up
long distance relationships for sure.

I guess Billy D or Rusty U.

-- dave

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

28 Oct 2008 - 6:39am
Kaleem
2008

I have multiple uses for Twitter. Depending on the context (there's
that word again) one or several of those uses come into play at a
given time.

Stay in touch with friends and colleagues distributed around the
world: Will, Dan and Dave have all discussed ambient intimacy. The
casual contact and conversations that we have with people in our
physical communities is difficult to have or maintain when physically
removed by great distances. Twitter's near real-time / asynchronous
design facilitates that in a convenient manner.

Live-tweet entire conferences (most recently IDEA 2008) and take
questions from a distributed audience: Almost everyone whom I have
seen since returning from IDEA - and who follows me on Twitter - has
thanked me for my conference updates. A few even said they felt like
they had attended the conference even though they weren't there(!).
I received numerous e-mails and Twitter messages from friends,
colleagues and strangers who found it valuable, too. I know that
Whitney has had a similar experience. I could take notes selfishly,
but more people learning encourages better design.

Save time: Because Twitter ties in to e-mail, Web and mobile - and I
may not know which medium is the best way to reach someone at a given
moment in time - a message sent via Twitter is a far more effective
and less time-consuming way to get in touch, especially when time is
a factor.

Learn about and share local, national and international events: News
about local meetups,conferences and social events are often
disseminated via Twitter. At a recent UX Irregulars meetup when Don
Turnbull was in town, one of the newcomers told me he learned of it
15 minutes before the event and showed up. He wouldn't have known
about it otherwise.

Travel information: Twitter is invaluable for travellers. Multiple
people at home and abroad - or others who are in transit - can
send/receive updates on my status, flight delay information, changes
in plans, directions, recommendations, etc no matter which city I am
in or en route to. Some of you have heard one of my best/worst travel
stories in which twitter plays an important role (too long to recount
here). A friend tells me she thinks it is the single best use of
Twitter she has ever seen.

Timely news: Several of us on Twitter documented and shared
information after an industrial accident in August led to a massive
explosion, followed by dozens more, at a propane storage facility. It
caused the evacuation of thousands, shut down public transit and the
city's arterial, 16-lane highway. Because it happened in the middle
of the night on a weekend, it was hours before news organizations
were able to respond. David Armano and I were online as the event
unfolded which inspired his post:
http://darmano.typepad.com/logic_emotion/2008/08/if-you-cant-bea.html

Richer communication: Cindy mentioned the power of narrative
experienced over time and the dialogues that start on Twitter
facilitate in-person introductions and conversation. We can jump
immediately to richer, meaningful conversations already understanding
much of the context that informs our thoughts.

Fun: Expressing one's thoughts in 140 characters can be poetic if
one chooses that approach - in my view, more should. Expressing
complex ideas in a short space is both a challenge and a reward.
Meeting in person is even more enjoyable than a random introduction
due to the shared history.

Contrary to what some say, there is no "correct" way to use Twitter
- though there are irresponsible and disrespectful ways. "What are
you doing?" is a starting point.

The rest is up to you.

-K

@kaleemux
http://twitter.com/kaleemux

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

31 Oct 2008 - 2:24am
Sachendra
2005

Melissa,

I use Twitter primarily for:

Sharing - I'll post links of what I find is interesting and give some commentary
Learning - It's interesting to find out what others are sharing and
talking about

In order to keep the signal to noise ratio down, I choose to follow
people who post content, comments and likes that fit my interests.

I did a little research on why people tweet a while back with some
interesting results, posted it on my blog
http://sachendra.wordpress.com/2008/04/04/why-we-tweet-what-value-does-twitter-bring-on-personal-and-business-front/

I'm available on twitter @sachendra

--
Sachendra Yadav
http://sachendra.wordpress.com

31 Oct 2008 - 7:32am
Benjamin Ho
2007

I use Twitter to stalk my friends.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

31 Oct 2008 - 11:00am
Jared M. Spool
2003

On Oct 31, 2008, at 5:32 AM, Benjamin Ho wrote:

> I use Twitter to stalk my friends.

I use twitter to keep people from guessing my real intentions.

31 Oct 2008 - 2:46pm
Ian Chan
2005

Funny -- I guess there's no way we'll ever know the user's intentions
on social media then!

On Oct 31, 2008, at 9:00 AM, Jared Spool wrote:

>
> On Oct 31, 2008, at 5:32 AM, Benjamin Ho wrote:
>
>> I use Twitter to stalk my friends.
>
> I use twitter to keep people from guessing my real intentions.

1 Nov 2008 - 9:44am
Pieter Jansegers
2008

There are many reasons to twitter. I made mine clear some while ago in this
tumblr posting:

Why twitter is such a great
success...<http://jansegers.tumblr.com/post/32407612/why-twitter-is-such-a-great-success><http://jansegers.tumblr.com/post/32407612/why-twitter-is-such-a-great-success>
http://jansegers.tumblr.com/post/32407612/why-twitter-is-such-a-great-success

But indeed: Twitter can be used in as many ways as language can be used.

The intentions of any speaker or writer can be different from the
acknowledged ones...

Irony, sarcasm, lies, even mythomania, all these are possible on twitter.

Pieter Jansegers
http://twitter.com/jansegers

On Fri, Oct 31, 2008 at 8:46 PM, adrian chan <adrian at gravity7.com> wrote:

> Funny -- I guess there's no way we'll ever know the user's intentions on
> social media then!
>
>
> On Oct 31, 2008, at 9:00 AM, Jared Spool wrote:
>
>
>> On Oct 31, 2008, at 5:32 AM, Benjamin Ho wrote:
>>
>> I use Twitter to stalk my friends.
>>>
>>
>> I use twitter to keep people from guessing my real intentions.
>>
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2 Nov 2008 - 1:59pm
dirtandrust
2008

Twitter is fantastic if you are moving to a new country! I'm moving
to New Zealand 11/12/08 and it's been invaluable connecting with my
fellow web designers and interaction designers.

I've met two recruiters there as well, one of which has gotten me to
the 2nd interview at a company that has a huge focus in Interaction
Design (Alan Cooper style) and I've learned tons preparing for thes
interviews.

Twitter, like the internet, is what you make it. You can find crap,
for sure, but befriend people who interest you and you can open up
new avenues quickly.

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Posted from the new ixda.org
http://www.ixda.org/discuss?post=34682

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